Sunday 16 February 1667/68

(Lord’s day). Up, and to my chamber, where all the morning making a catalogue of my books, which did find me work, but with great pleasure, my chamber and books being now set in very good order, and my chamber washed and cleaned, which it had not been in some months before, my business and trouble having been so much. At noon Mr. Holliard put in, and dined with my wife and me, who was a little better to-day. His company very good. His story of his love and fortune, which hath been very good and very bad in the world, well worth hearing. Much discourse also about the bad state of the Church, and how the Clergy are come to be men of no worth in the world; and, as the world do now generally discourse, they must be reformed; and I believe the Hierarchy will in a little time be shaken, whether they will or no; the King being offended with them, and set upon it, as I hear.

He gone, after dinner to have my head combed, and then to my chamber and read most of the evening till pretty late, when, my wife not being well, I did lie below stairs in our great chamber, where I slept well.


6 Annotations

Australian Susan  •  Link

"...where I slept well..." - the implication being that poor Bess didn't?

Have to say that as a Librarian, I *like* this entry!

Michael L  •  Link

"the bad state of the Church, arid how the Clergy" ... surely "arid" is a scan error for "and"?

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"the bad state of the Church, arid how the Clergy" ... surely "arid" is a scan error for "and"?

L&M read "and".

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"... my wife not being well, I did lie below stairs in our great chamber, where I slept well."

So he and Elizabeth usually sleep in the second-best chamber? Maybe the room is warmer? Below stairs usually means the servants' quarters, which were usually warmer, by why would their 'great chamber' be there? We need a floor plan again.

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

Today John Tinker advises Sam that he's contracted for 40 pairs of oars, "not to be delivered till there be money to pay for them" (State Papers No. 187, https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=gCk5AQAAM…). Maybe a workable compromise, if it's OK with the oar-makers.

And, still tracking M. de la Roche: He's in Cowes. His English soldiers (now of dubious legality) include a son of Sir John Skelton. He's there to "prevent the Ostend privateers", and apparently didn't slaughter them all when he caught some. So, a gentleman on a mission for Good, with quality people aboard and good manners. Really nothing to worry about (State Papers No. 190).

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