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StanB has posted 102 annotations/comments since 17 January 2016.

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About Tuesday 20 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

Methinks Terry doth have Ye Worlde Cup on his mind, Sasha...
"Saha"
Louis Saha is a French former professional footballer and a good one at that

About Sunday 11 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

^^^ woohoo^^^
That was my 100th Annotation since joining this wonderful site

About Sunday 11 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

Thank's for that Sarah,
I suppose sometimes we forget to look at this diary and Sams life through the values and mindset of the 17th-century perspective..............

About Wednesday 14 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

Of the four distinguished men who died after the late action with the Dutch and were buried in Westminster Abbey, the Earl of Marlborough was interred on June 14th, Viscount Muskerry on the 19th, the Earl of Falmouth on the 22nd, and Sir Edward Broughton on the 26th

Interesting to note the dates above and below

Today we remember Professor Stephen Hawking who's Ashes will be interred at Westminister Abbey today 15th June lying alongside Sir Isaac Newton who was 23 at the time of this diary entry 2 great men immortalised forever RIP

About Sunday 11 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

Thanks for that Sarah, I only ask because given most of the time Sams world occupied a very small space and within living memory of 1665 just 30 years previous in 1636 there was a large plague outbreak up in Newcastle that wiped out thousands.
Also, of course, London had a plague outbreak in 1603 and obviously The black death that ravaged Europe, Asia, and North Africa 1346–1350 that accounted for 75–200 million
So it occurs to me that while the majority of the common uneducated people were probably unaware historically of previous outbreaks how aware were the people of Sams elevation/status of just how devasting these outbreaks were did they have the numbers at that time were they known facts

About Sunday 11 June 1665

StanB  •  Link

Harman, his wife being ill
Interesting I would have thought any sign of any type of illness close by would have them scampering for the hills or Oxford as Charles did.
I wonder how common ailments were viewed at that time given the heightened tension with Plague being present were they merely dealt with as they would normally be, or at the slightest sniff or a cough did panic ensue.
It reminds me of the Spanish flu pandemic which killed nearly 100 million people in 1918 and 1919 and to a lesser extent the recent Ebola breakouts in Africa and previous to that the Aids epidemic of the early eighties and the amount of scaremongering that went on I would imagine given Sams small world at that time the panic was quite high

About Monday 17 April 1665

StanB  •  Link

So, Sam recognised by Charles, mmm is that a good thing or a bad thing it must be good for Sam's self esteem but it could be a double edged sword, Incognito V Scrutiny

About Wednesday 29 March 1665

StanB  •  Link

So to my office, where late about drawing up a proposal for Captain Taylor, for him to deliver to the City about his building the new ship, (HMS Loyal London)
History of name "London" within the Royal Navy
Thirteen ships of the Royal Navy have been named London, after the city of London. Another was named HMS Loyal London (1666):
English ship London (1636) was a 40-gun East Indiaman purchased in 1636 and listed until 1653.
The London (1656) was a 64-gun second-rate ship launched in 1656 and blown up in an accident in 1665.
HMS Loyal London (1666) was a 96-gun second-rate ship launched in 1666. She was partly destroyed by fire by the Dutch in the Medway in 1667, but the remains were rebuilt becoming the next HMS London.
HMS London (1670) was a 96-gun first-rate ship launched in 1670 to replace the previous ship of the same name. She was rebuilt in 1706 and 1721, and was broken up in 1747.
HMS London (1756) was a 16-gun brigantine launched in 1756 on Lake Ontario and captured by the French the same year.
HMS London (1756) was a 6-gun busse, formerly the civilian fisheries vessel Holden. She was purchased in 1756 from the Society for the Free British Fishery and burnt to avoid capture in 1758.
HMS London (1759) was a 6-gun busse purchased in 1759 and in the records until 1764.
HMS London (1766) was a 90-gun second rate launched in 1766 and broken up in 1811.
HMS London was to have been a 104-gun first rate. She was renamed HMS Royal Adelaide in 1827, and launched in 1828. She was sold in 1905.
HMS London (1840) was a 92-gun second rate launched in 1840. She was converted to screw propulsion in 1858 and rearmed to 72 guns. She became a harbour storeship in 1874 and was sold in 1884.
HMS London (1899) was a Formidable-class battleship launched in 1899. She was converted to a minelayer in 1918 and was sold in 1920.
HMS London was a County-class heavy cruiser launched in 1927 and sold in 1950.
HMS London was a County-class guided missile destroyer launched in 1961 and transferred to Pakistan in 1982, where she was renamed Babur.
HMS London was a Type 22 frigate launched in 1984 and sold to Romania in 2002. They renamed her Regina Maria.