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has posted 126 annotations/comments since 7 August 2015.

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About Saturday 10 October 1668

JayW  •  Link

From the entry for Monday 11 October:
to the King’s playhouse, and I afterwards by water with them, and there we did hear the Eunuch (who, it seems, is a Frenchman, but long bred in Italy) sing, which I seemed to take as new to me, though I saw him on Saturday last, but said nothing of it;

A glimpse into today? A visit to the theatre which Bess knew nothing about? Or maybe Saturday 3rd?

About Wednesday 30 September 1668

JayW  •  Link

Milford and Pembroke.
Milford Haven is in Pembrokeshire. I suspect that might be the explanation for John Howell apparently sending letters from different addresses.

About Wednesday 23 September 1668

JayW  •  Link

SDS - you wanted ideas. Here are mine.
Blount is in prison in Bruges. He is willing to betray Granger and says he (Blount) is the only one who knows where to find him and the false names he uses.
There is only a civil action against Blount so the Bruges magistrates won’t deport him.
The author of the letter is willing to help arrange the deal so long as it’s kept secret.
Granger says he can corrupt all the postmasters. He is planning to invest £1,000 in a bill of exchange which he will use to make a counterfeit for £5,000 or £6,000 and has already sent an agent off to get it.
Granger will soon go somewhere away from London for the winter and that’s when he could be arrested most easily.

About Thursday 2 July 1668

JayW  •  Link

Yes please carry on with the correspondence Sarah. It does give an insight into the work of the Navy Office. Thanks!

About Tuesday 26 May 1668

JayW  •  Link

Hodsden and Tibalds. Both local to me, and the road would probably have been what is now the A1010 which runs through Hoddesdon, Cheshunt, Waltham Cross and on through North London to Bishopsgate. What little remains of Tibalds (Theobalds Palace) is in what is now Cedars Park, where I used to walk in my lunch hour occasionally when I was working. Theobalds Park is on the other side of the dual carriageway of the A10, cut off from the site of the old palace. Until a few years ago, the original Temple Bar was in Theobalds Park, but it has now been returned to the City and is close to St Paul’s Cathedral.

About Theobalds Palace (nr Cheshunt, Herts)

JayW  •  Link

The Palace of Theobalds was situated in what is now Cedars Park, which is now separated from Theobalds Park by the A10 dual carriageway. There are still a few ruined walls remaining at Cedars Park

About Daily diary emails update

JayW  •  Link

My thanks too Phil. Always enjoy my daily trip to the past, especially as a Londoner now living out in the country - and as it’s now over a year since I travelled in to the City it reminds me of familiar places from my own past.

About Monday 27 April 1668

JayW  •  Link

I agree with Dorothy. I also thought the ‘boy’ referred to was Mr John Parkhurst. A touch of ‘where did that time go?’

About Tuesday 14 April 1668

JayW  •  Link

Sam Ursu- the orange girl who became the mistress of Charles II was Nell Gwynn

About Friday 10 April 1668

JayW  •  Link

A couple of mentions above of ‘weighing’ the ships in the Medway. I assume this meaning is the same as ‘weighing the anchor’ ie lifting it and that these would have been the ships that are currently blocking the river.

About Saturday 28 March 1668

JayW  •  Link

James Morgan - Here in the U.K. the week between Palm Sunday and Easter is known as Holy Week hence Sam’s reference to ‘this holyday week’. This year, 2021, Palm Sunday was yesterday, so Holy Week started yesterday.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - I think you are correct about the quartet of players. Towards the end of the entry it says -
‘I paid the fiddlers 3l. among the four‘

About Wednesday 5 February 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

‘my Lord had fifty pieces of gold taken out of his pocket that night, after he was in bed’
Would this be wedding gifts slipped into my Lord’s pocket during the celebrations in the same way that modern Greek brides have notes pinned to their dress? Theft as suggested by Australian Susan seems unlikely.

About Sunday 19 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - today’s entry is dated 18 January, 2 days after the request for tickets. That suggests to me that the crew were being paid off, and maybe that is why Sam has decided the ship has to go too.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

Above posted too quickly. I should also have said that ‘in our entry’ means somewhere close to the house or office, perhaps by a gate or path leading to it rather than actually inside. Mrs Bagwell was spotted but had gone before Sam could get to her.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - Sed = but. Sam’s cryptic note re Mrs Bagwell translates more or less as ‘I wanted to try it on but she was gone’. Nothing happened at home or abroad as he couldn’t find her later on.

About Tuesday 24 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Sam had an office lunch and was crushed in a crowd of people at the Midnight Mass. This morning my husband and I will be masked in a socially distanced church with no more than 60 in the congregation then home to spend the day together instead of the house party with all of the family. What a difference. Still, Merry Christmas 2020 everyone! Keep safe.

About Monday 16 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Extract from Daily Telegraph (2):

Because Pepys designed a library of 3,000 books, with none added and none taken away (under pain of its transfer to Trinity), Luckett could not make suitable additions as he found them, even if they were books Pepys was known once to have read.

However, he intended parts of his own collection to form an annexe of suitable materials, including, for instance, his dozens of 17th-century musical scores and a contemporary manuscript of Purcell’s 1692 Ode to St Cecilia.

For years, Luckett helped the art dealer Neil Clayton to identify the subjects of portraits. One day Clayton invited him to look at a large canvas of a well-satisfied, profusely wigged gentleman leaning on his desk.

The view behind him of the Naval Yard at Harwich, where Pepys was MP, and a book from Pepys’s Library confirmed the resemblance. Luckett promptly acquired the picture for a fraction of its value and hung it in the Library. And so it remains – an addition, but not a book and so, he declared, not in breach of the rules.