Annotations and comments

JayW has posted 116 annotations/comments since 7 August 2015.

The most recent first…

Comments

About Friday 10 April 1668

JayW  •  Link

A couple of mentions above of ‘weighing’ the ships in the Medway. I assume this meaning is the same as ‘weighing the anchor’ ie lifting it and that these would have been the ships that are currently blocking the river.

About Saturday 28 March 1668

JayW  •  Link

James Morgan - Here in the U.K. the week between Palm Sunday and Easter is known as Holy Week hence Sam’s reference to ‘this holyday week’. This year, 2021, Palm Sunday was yesterday, so Holy Week started yesterday.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - I think you are correct about the quartet of players. Towards the end of the entry it says -
‘I paid the fiddlers 3l. among the four‘

About Wednesday 5 February 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

‘my Lord had fifty pieces of gold taken out of his pocket that night, after he was in bed’
Would this be wedding gifts slipped into my Lord’s pocket during the celebrations in the same way that modern Greek brides have notes pinned to their dress? Theft as suggested by Australian Susan seems unlikely.

About Sunday 19 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - today’s entry is dated 18 January, 2 days after the request for tickets. That suggests to me that the crew were being paid off, and maybe that is why Sam has decided the ship has to go too.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

Above posted too quickly. I should also have said that ‘in our entry’ means somewhere close to the house or office, perhaps by a gate or path leading to it rather than actually inside. Mrs Bagwell was spotted but had gone before Sam could get to her.

About Monday 6 January 1667/68

JayW  •  Link

SDS - Sed = but. Sam’s cryptic note re Mrs Bagwell translates more or less as ‘I wanted to try it on but she was gone’. Nothing happened at home or abroad as he couldn’t find her later on.

About Tuesday 24 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Sam had an office lunch and was crushed in a crowd of people at the Midnight Mass. This morning my husband and I will be masked in a socially distanced church with no more than 60 in the congregation then home to spend the day together instead of the house party with all of the family. What a difference. Still, Merry Christmas 2020 everyone! Keep safe.

About Monday 16 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Extract from Daily Telegraph (2):

Because Pepys designed a library of 3,000 books, with none added and none taken away (under pain of its transfer to Trinity), Luckett could not make suitable additions as he found them, even if they were books Pepys was known once to have read.

However, he intended parts of his own collection to form an annexe of suitable materials, including, for instance, his dozens of 17th-century musical scores and a contemporary manuscript of Purcell’s 1692 Ode to St Cecilia.

For years, Luckett helped the art dealer Neil Clayton to identify the subjects of portraits. One day Clayton invited him to look at a large canvas of a well-satisfied, profusely wigged gentleman leaning on his desk.

The view behind him of the Naval Yard at Harwich, where Pepys was MP, and a book from Pepys’s Library confirmed the resemblance. Luckett promptly acquired the picture for a fraction of its value and hung it in the Library. And so it remains – an addition, but not a book and so, he declared, not in breach of the rules.

About Monday 16 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Extract from Daily Telegraph (1):

Richard Luckett,who has died aged 75, was for 30 years Samuel Pepys’s Librarian at Magdalene College, Cambridge.

The diarist and eyewitness to the Great Fire of London is famous for chronicling the life of a young man all about town between 1660 and 1669. Less well-known is the Mr Pepys, MP, of later years, who served as Secretary to the Admiralty and President of the Royal Society, and who as a collector assembled 3,000 volumes of printed books and manuscripts, intended as a conspectus of human knowledge.
Before he died in 1703, Pepys directed that his Library, including the six shorthand volumes of diary, go to Magdalene College, Cambridge. Arranged by height in his 12 glass-fronted bookcases, it was to live in a building to be renamed the Bibliotheca Pepysiana, and was to be a time-capsule. And so it remains.
Luckett was the ideal Pepys Librarian (1982-2012). No one could better have matched Pepys’s interests in the Royal Navy (Drake’s personal almanac and an illustrated survey of his fleet are in the Library), music, street ballads, scientific history (Newton’s own copy of Principia Mathematica), architecture, mechanical trades, engravings … More than a curator, Luckett came to embody the Library.
His passing claim to have “read it” – all – was disingenuous (surely not the bilingual dictionaries?), but he will never have a rival.

He oversaw the completion of the multi-volume published catalogue (1978-94) and contributed hundreds of pages to the Companion volume of the great Latham-Matthews edition of Pepys’s Diary (1970-83). His essay on music was later boiled down for Radio 4 under the improbable rubric “What would have been on Samuel Pepys’s iPod?”

About Monday 16 December 1667

JayW  •  Link

Off topic for today’s entry but the Daily Telegraph of 17 December 2020 has the obituary of Richard Luckett, for 30 years Samuel Pepys’s Librarian at Magdalene College, Cambridge. It has some details of Samuel ‘s bequest.

About Thursday 14 November 1667

JayW  •  Link

Thanks Terry. That wasn’t the one I meant though - it was a TV programme, part of a series called ‘Britain’s Most Historic Towns’.

About Thursday 14 November 1667

JayW  •  Link

There was an interesting programme on Channel 4 about Restoration London last night (14-11-2020) in which Professor Alice Roberts mentioned Samuel Pepys several times. One comment made to her was that it was the introduction of coffee (which led to minds being stimulated rather than suffering the effects of the morning draught of beer) which boosted the scientific discoveries at the Royal Society.

About Monday 28 October 1667

JayW  •  Link

It’s possible to look at 79 Pall Mall on Google Maps, with its blue plaque referring to Nell Gwynn.

About Thursday 12 September 1667

JayW  •  Link

If Pepys was on a horse he could still have had his boy with him who could have been on foot. It’s unlikely he would have gone faster than a walk through the streets so a boy could have kept up. Said boy would then have been available to hold the horse, carry the tallies, maybe return it if Pepys no longer needed it. Or there would have been an urchin ready to hold it in exchange for a ha’penny or farthing, guv!

About Sunday 16 June 1667

JayW  •  Link

A bit off-topic to comment on the comments but the OED quote from CGS above includes the word ‘bigly‘. An Old English word still in use by Donald Trump!

About Wednesday 5 June 1667

JayW  •  Link

‘law french’ as referred to in Terry’s first comment above was still being used in 1969 when I started working for the Inland Revenue. A married woman’s income had to be included on her husband’s tax return unless they were separated, when she could send in her own return and was referred to as a ‘feme sole’ in our internal instruction books.