Annotations and comments

john has posted 307 annotations/comments since 14 March 2013.

Comments

About Wednesday 1 January 1667/68

john  •  Link

And so I dusted off the last volume of our wonderful journey. It weighs in at 565 pp. May the coming year bring us all hope, health, and happiness.

About Saturday 28 December 1667

john  •  Link

"the child crying, she by force got upon the stage, and took up her child"
Centuries later, W.C. Fields would warn to never share the stage with children or animals.

About Sunday 15 December 1667

john  •  Link

@SDS, Picard's book "Restoration London" has a section on dentistry in chapter 6, wherein she wrote: "Instead of implantation, the tooth might be anchored to its neighbours by silver wire, or silk thread." Her reference is to Smith, "A short history of dentistry". Implants were either human teeth (with an abundance available after the plague) or other material. She also refers to Woodford, "The strange story of false teeth".

Your root-canal story surprises me. Was gutta-percha not used?

About Tuesday 3 December 1667

john  •  Link

ONeville, I take objection to your comment. It is your opinion whether you perceive your civil service to be "economical with the truth". Here, Parliament is out for blood and will latch onto anything. Coventry is advising Pepys not to write down anything that may appear to be a target.

About Friday 29 November 1667

john  •  Link

Thank you for the link, SDS, on the horrors of child sweeps at that time. In happy contrast, our chimneys are lined and our sweep uses a wire brush on rople.

About Friday 8 November 1667

john  •  Link

Down goes the wall but is it structural? Will anything else come down? I understand that builders then would overbuild by today's codes but I would love to have a reference on 17th century practices.

About Friday 1 November 1667

john  •  Link

"[...] all this envy and design to ruin Sir W. Coventry — did arise from Sir W. Coventry’s unfortunate mistake the other day, in producing of a letter from the Duke of Albemarle, touching the good condition of all things at Chatham just before the Dutch come up [...]; for upon this they are resolved to undo him [...]"

If I read this correctly, because Albemarle is the House's golden boy and can do no wrong, Coventry has raised their enmity by showing them otherwise.

About Tuesday 29 October 1667

john  •  Link

L&M footnote on the ticket defence:
"[The report] argued the necessity of payment by tickets, even of whole ships, in order to avoid the necessity of carrying large sums of cash on board."

About Tuesday 22 October 1667

john  •  Link

"None of my brethren said anything but me there" -- It appears that Pepys was the correct choice as spokesman, as Robert observed, assuming no "back blows".

About Thursday 10 October 1667

john  •  Link

I wonder if Pepys ever saw the humour of this. Certainly, I can understand his consternation at the time. It is also surprising that the bags were not dug up by a dog or somesuch.

About Friday 27 September 1667

john  •  Link

"my wife sends for me to come home" -- summons obeyed; their marriage was more egalitarian than some would believe.

About Thursday 26 September 1667

john  •  Link

L&M offer the following: "Pepys's 'varnished things' were papers marked out with arithmetic tables"

About Monday 23 September 1667

john  •  Link

I confess to being unclear why drinking to the Duke of York's health was to be kept quiet. The brothers drank and made up. Why was the king bothered afterwards?

About Thursday 19 September 1667

john  •  Link

I think that L.K. inadvertantly proves Paul Chapin's point. Pepys is an excellent administrator who has reached his standing by hard and diligent work. Yet L.K. denigrates him by calling him an "upstart". For all his naval knowledge and administrative skill, he is employed at pleasure and being seen with the "wrong" people would jeopardise that.

About Monday 16 September 1667

john  •  Link

A belated note to the "painted lady". L&M note that "Mrs Pearse was described in 1678 as having a complexion 'florid and pure red without paint'." Whether a birthmark of a bad case of rosacea is unknown but seems to explain the heavy make-up.

About Monday 16 September 1667

john  •  Link

"sluttish dinner"
Meanings change over time, Nicolas.

From the OED:
sluttish, a.
2. Of things: Unclean, dirty, grimy; untidy.
   1549 Coverdale, etc. Erasm. Par. 2 Tim. 23 In sluttishe clothes, with a countrefaicte grauitie of countenaunce,‥they conueye them selues in to other mens houses.    1553 Respublica iii. vi. 853 Suche hongrye doggs will slabbe vp sluttishe puddinges.    1599 Davies Immort. Soul Introd. xxxiii. (1714) 9 The Man loves least at Home to be, That hath a sluttish House.    1617 Moryson Itin. iii. 180 Their wives‥are attired in a sluttish gowne.    1665 Sir T. Herbert Trav. (1677) 311 Some boil the cream in a raw skin, so as it is commonly very sluttish, full of hairs and unsalted. [...]