1893 text

The first edition of Butler’s “Hudibras” is dated 1663, and it probably had only been published a few days when Pepys bought it and sold it at a loss. He subsequently endeavoured to appreciate the work, but was not successful. The edition in the Pepysian Library is dated 1689.

8 Annotations

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this


Samuel Butler. (1612–1680)
two of 71 quotables;
Beside, ’t is known he could speak Greek
As naturally as pigs squeak; [1]
That Latin was no more difficile
Than to a blackbird ’t is to whistle. Hudibras. Part i. Canto i. Line 51.
and then this
68
For those that fly may fight again,
Which he can never do that ’s slain. [21]
Hudibras. Part iii. Canto iii. Line 243.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Hudibras
You can read it online here:
http://www.exclassics.com/hudibras/hbintro.htm

Nix   Link to this

18th century "Hudibrastic verse" (iambic tetrameter) was at the center of John Barth's satirical novel "The Sot Weed Factor" in the 1960s.

http://www.nytimes.com/books/98/06/21/specials/...

Pedro   Link to this

Hudibras (Brewers)

Said to be a caricature of Sir Samuel Luke, a patron of Samuel Butler. The Grub Street Journal (1731) maintains it was Colonel Rolle, of Devonshire, with whom the poet lodged for some time, and adds that the name is derived from Hugh de Bras, the patron saint of the county. He represents the Presbyterian Party, and his squire the Independants.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

ref: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/12/26/
NOTE SPELLINGS:

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

poet FROM Oxford Dictionary of QUOTATIONS; Which one upset our Samuell
He'd run in debt by disputation,
And pay with ratiocination.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 77
2
For rhetoric he could not ope
His mouth, but out there flew a trope.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 81

3
A Babylonish dialect
Which learned pedants much affect.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 935
 

He knew what's what, and that's as high
As metaphysic wit can fly.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 149

6
Such as take lodgings in a head
That's to be let unfurnished.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 159

7
And still be doing, never done:
As if Religion were intended
For nothing else but to be mended.
Hudibras  pt. 1 (1663), canto 1, l. 202

Michael Robinson   Link to this

The edition in the Pepysian Library is:-

Hudibras. The first part. Written in the time of the late wars. Edition Corrected and amended, with several additions and annotations
London: printed for Henry Herringman, [R. Chiswell, T. Sawbridge, R. Bentley, Thomas Horne, and G. Wells] and are to be sold by Tho. Sawbridge at the Three Flower-de-Luces in Little Britain [and Richard Parker],1689.
[2], 221, [3], 223-412, [2], 254 p. ; 8⁰
Wing B6304
Anonymous. By Samuel Butler. In verse. In three parts. Parts 2 and 3 (the latter separately listed as Wing B6317A) each have separate title page. Imprint to part 2 reads: London, printed for R. Chiswell, T. Sawbridge, R. Bentley, and G. Wells, 1689"; imprint to part 3 reads "London: printed for Thomas Horne, at the south entrance to the Royal Exchange. MDCLXXXIX. Part 3 has separate pagination and register and may also have been issued separately. There was another issue in the same year, Wing B6320.

Pedro   Link to this

Hudibras: The reaction of the King

Brodrick to Ormond
Written from: [London]
Date: 28 November 1663
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 33, fol(s). 229

..."The King is strangely delighted with this 2nd part of Hudibras, and Sir Paul Neill, whom he [so in MS., but the writer means to say "the author"] hath ridiculously charactered in 'Sydrophel', as strangely ashamed. The author threatens a third part, which I will, if he proceed, bring either in print or in MS.".

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References

  • 1662
  • 1663
  • 1664
  • 1665
  • 1668