Friday 16 April 1669

Up, and to my chamber, where with Mr. Gibson all the morning, and there by noon did almost finish what I had to write about the Administration of the Office to present to the Duke of York, and my wife being gone abroad with W. Hewer, to see the new play to-day, at the Duke of York’s house, “Guzman,” I dined alone with my people, and in the afternoon away by coach to White Hall; and there the Office attended the Duke of York; and being despatched pretty soon, and told that we should not wait on the King, as intended, till Sunday, I thence presently to the Duke of York’s playhouse, and there, in the 18d. seat, did get room to see almost three acts of the play; but it seemed to me but very ordinary. After the play done, I into the pit, and there find my wife and W. Hewer; and Sheres got to them, which, so jealous is my nature, did trouble me, though my judgment tells me there is no hurt in it, on neither side; but here I did meet with Shadwell, the poet, who, to my great wonder, do tell me that my Lord of [Orrery] did write this play, trying what he could do in comedy, since his heroique plays could do no more wonders. This do trouble me; for it is as mean a thing, and so he says, as hath been upon the stage a great while; and Harris, who hath no part in it, did come to me, and told me in discourse that he was glad of it, it being a play that will not take. Thence home, and to my business at the office, to finish it, but was in great pain about yesterday still, lest my wife should have sent her porter to enquire anything, though for my heart I cannot see it possible how anything could be discovered of it, but yet such is fear as to render me full of doubt and disgust. At night to supper and to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the 18d. seat"

L&M say this was in the middle gallery, between the boxes and the upper gallery.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

When you dine alone with your people...You go to Whitehall. When you go to Whitehall, you attend the Duke of York. When you attend the Duke of York, you go to the Duke's playhouse and sit in the 18d seats. When you sit in the 18d seats you go to the pit. When you go to the pit you meet your wife with Henry Sheeres. When you meet your wife with Henry Sheeres you get jealous. When you get jealous you meet the poet Shadwell. When you meet the poet Shadwell, you help him write comedy. Don't help Shadwell the poet write comedy.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Seems Will is no longer deligated to follow about with Sam everywhere...I wonder if Tom has been assigned the watchdog role or if Bess is giving Sam a little freedom on trust?

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

A most uneasy trip to bed, "full of doubt and disgust." A la R. Gertz I see an angel perched on Sam's right shoulder worried that he is losing the argument to the devil perched on his left one.

Maurie Beck   Link to this

I see an angel perched on Sam’s right shoulder worried that he is losing the argument to the devil perched on his left one.

I think the devil's perched elsewhere past the argument stage.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I guess the question now is will Deb succumb or will she choose to break free of him. It will take a lot to drive Sam away and I'd guess he's been not only her first love, in some way, to some extent...But a father figure to a lonely girl. A little shock, say Will spying something and getting upset, wouldn't hurt right now to jolt Sam out of this bad behavior pattern. With Sam, fear is a great inducer of virtue. Still, with all its terrifying selfishness, Sam's affair has its pathetic side...Especially in that in his calmer moments he's fully aware he's behaving idiotically and badly and does experience remorse for Bess and Deb. His honesty, at least to himself, can't be denied.

Mary   Link to this

I'm betting on Deb failing to show up on Monday in Westminster Hall. Could be wrong, of course, but I'm not at all sure that even 20s is going to be enough to entice her back into Sam's clutches.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I’m betting on Deb failing to show up on Monday in Westminster Hall. Could be wrong, of course, but I’m not at all sure that even 20s is going to be enough to entice her back into Sam’s clutches."

In that case...He'll have to use...

Charm...

"Charm, Mr. Pepys?..." "That's right, Mr. Howe...Charm."

"Oh, Charm..."

Uhhhh...

"Mr. Pepys has a little job for you."

Uhhhhh....

"He won't...Break her, will he?"

"No...He'll do a nice, quiet job."

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