Saturday 7 November 1668

Up, and at the office all the morning, and so to it again after dinner, and there busy late, choosing to employ myself rather than go home to trouble with my wife, whom, however, I am forced to comply with, and indeed I do pity her as having cause enough for her grief. So to bed, and there slept ill because of my wife. This afternoon I did go out towards Sir D. Gawden’s, thinking to have bespoke a place for my coach and horses, when I have them, at the Victualling Office; but find the way so bad and long that I returned, and looked up and down for places elsewhere, in an inne, which I hope to get with more convenience than there.

6 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Samuel Pepys admitting to himself that he made the bed of nails he must lie on -- and that Elizabeth is entitled to every bit of her (perhaps infinite) anger.

John   Link to this

Sam recording his feelings with that great honesty we have come to love and respect.
And then that so familiar trudge round London streets looking 'up and down'for parking that he can afford, and which is not miles from the office.

Katherine   Link to this

If we get to the end of the diary without a coach and horse and a place to stable them, I'm going to have a complete fit of frustration.

jeannine   Link to this

If we get to the end of the diary without a coach and horse and a place to stable them, I’m going to have a complete fit of frustration.

At the rate Sam is going he's probably going to need to build a doghouse first as that might be where he ends up sleeping.....

Dorothy   Link to this

IMO the doghouse would be an improvement! I do feel sorry for him. He has tried to be fashionable and chase women like the men at court, but his wife is not interested in being fashionable in that way and won't play along. Poor Sam just doesn't have the personality to be a Real Restoration Rake.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Still at least this may end the affair before it gets irrepairable...Sam's been foolish but not all the way foolish, with Deb.

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