Wednesday 12 August 1668

Up, and all the morning busy at my office. Thence to the Excise Office, and so to the Temple to take counsel about Major Nicholls’s business for the King. So to several places about business, and among others to Drumbleby’s about the mouths for my paper tubes, and so to the ‘Change and home. Met Captain Cocke, who tells me that he hears for certain the Duke of York will lose the authority of an Admiral, and be governed by a Committee: and all our Office changed; only they are in dispute whether I shall continue or no, which puts new thoughts in me, but I know not whether to be glad or sorry. Home to dinner, where Pelling dines with us, and brings some partridges, which is very good meat; and, after dinner, I, and wife, and Mercer, and Deb., to the Duke of York’s house, and saw “Mackbeth,” to our great content, and then home, where the women went to the making of my tubes, and I to the office, and then come Mrs. Turner and her husband to advise about their son, the Chaplain, who is turned out of his ship, a sorrow to them, which I am troubled for, and do give them the best advice I can, and so they gone we to bed.

11 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Captain Cocke...tells me that he hears for certain the Duke of York will lose the authority of an Admiral, and be governed by a Committee:"

Captain Cocke may for certain have heard this, but it did not happen, L&M note, until the Test Act http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Test_Act#1673_Act forced his resignation in 1672.

Katherine   Link to this

Please, what is a tube?

Mary   Link to this

the making of my tubes.

According to "The Big Brown Eyes of Samuel Pepys" ( cited earlier in the journal Archives of Ophthalmology) these tubes were 3 inches in length with small orifices at the lower end. They worked by eliminating binocular vision and glare. At first they seemed to offer Pepys some relief and hope and they became his favoured visual aid for some time.

Jenny   Link to this

Restructuring the office. Perennial issue.

Bryan M   Link to this

"these tubes were 3 inches in length with small orifices at the lower end ... they became his favoured visual aid for some time"

Oh, to to be privy to the comments of Tom Hayter and the other Navy clerks down at the Dolphin over the coming weeks. Staff can be sooo cruel.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the making of my tubes"

These contraptions were supported by scientific testimony -- such as it was --: “An easy help for decayed sight,” *The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society*, No. 37” http://goo.gl/k1S72

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Of course, their support in a publication of the Royal Society -- who were known to try, with great solemnity, to weigh air! -- might very well have rendered the "spectacular tubes" even more risible in the office!

JWB   Link to this

Pinhole glasses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinhole_glasses

Can be purchased @ Amazon.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and all our Office changed; only they are in dispute whether I shall continue or no, which puts new thoughts in me, but I know not whether to be glad or sorry."

As Jenny points out, reorgs are a perennial issue, as is the ambivalence of the "survivor" that Sam is feeling...

Adrianne   Link to this

Hmm... the mouseover for Thomas Turner, right next to a mention of his son Thomas Jr., says "... they had one son, Moses." Wiped Tommy Jr. from history, did they?

pepfie   Link to this

"Major Nicholls’s business" was to dispose of the wrecks sunk in the Medway River in 1667. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/06/13/

Copy of an agreement between the Admiralty and Henry Nichols of Kilmeaden, Co. Waterford, concerning the clearing of the Medway River, 1668.
http://sources.nli.ie/Record/MS_UR_004264/Holdi...

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