Saturday 11 January 1667/68

Lay some time, talking with my wife in bed about Pall’s business, and she do conclude to have her married here, and to be merry at it; and to have W. Hewer, and Batelier, and Mercer, and Willet bridemen and bridemaids, and to be very merry; and so I am glad of it, and do resolve to let it be done as soon as I can. So up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and thence home to dinner, and from dinner with Mercer, who dined with us, and wife and Deb. to the King’s house, there to see “The Wild-goose Chase,” which I never saw, but have long longed to see it, being a famous play, but as it was yesterday I do find that where I expect most I find least satisfaction, for in this play I met with nothing extraordinary at all, but very dull inventions and designs. Knepp come and sat by us, and her talk pleased me a little, she telling me how Mis Davis is for certain going away from the Duke’s house, the King being in love with her; and a house is taken for her, and furnishing; and she hath a ring given her already worth 600l.: that the King did send several times for Nelly, and she was with him, but what he did she knows not; this was a good while ago, and she says that the King first spoiled Mrs. Weaver, which is very mean, methinks, in a prince, and I am sorry for it, and can hope for no good to the State from having a Prince so devoted to his pleasure. She told me also of a play shortly coming upon the stage, of Sir Charles Sidly’s, which, she thinks, will be called “The Wandering Ladys,” a comedy that, she thinks, will be most pleasant; and also another play, called “The Duke of Lerma;” besides “Catelin,” which she thinks, for want of the clothes which the King promised them, will not be acted for a good while. Thence home, and there to the office and did some business, and so with my wife for half an hour walking in the moonlight, and it being cold, frosty weather, walking in the garden, and then home to supper, and so by the fireside to have my head combed, as I do now often do, by Deb., whom I love should be fiddling about me, and so to bed.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ossory to [his father] Ormond
Written from: [London]
Date: 11 January 1668

Lord Arlington has conversed with the King upon the subject of the Duke[of Ormond]'s letter. The King makes no difficulty as to the appointment of a Deputy to govern in the Duke's absence, and will, the writer believes, do his part to prevent any mischance to the Duke's injury, as far as he may have the power.

Sir Robert Howard [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/10619/ ] complains of the Duke for having given to Sir Allan Broderick a Commissionership [under the Act of Settlement for Ireland] which, at first, had been intended for Howard himself, according to his own account.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Margaret   Link to this

...“Catelin,” which she thinks, for want of the clothes which the King promised them, will not be acted for a good while."

I assume from this that players (or perhaps the company) had to buy hand-me-down clothes from the nobility. I remember reading that in Elizabethan England, actors were actually forbidden to wear their aristocratic costumes on the street--does anyone know if this was still the case in the 1660s?

Lady's maids and valets gained a good part of their earnings by selling old clothes to the actors.

These days, when clothes are so cheap, it's hard to remember what a huge expense even one suit of clothes could be.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"I do find that where I expect most I find least satisfaction"
Right. When I watch a movie that's been hyped to the skies I'm often disappointed.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a play shortly coming upon the stage, of Sir Charles Sidly’s, which, she thinks, will be called “The Wandering Ladys,”...

evidently not: L&M say it was probably the play Sedley called "The Mulberry-Garden".

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and so by the fireside to have my head combed, as I do now often do, by Deb., whom I love should be fiddling about me..."

Uh oh.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Definite uh-oh.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Lay some time, talking with my wife in bed about Pall’s business, and she do conclude to have her married here, and to be merry at it; and to have W. Hewer, and Batelier, and Mercer, and Willet bridemen and bridemaids, and to be very merry; and so I am glad of it, and do resolve to let it be done as soon as I can."

Considering Bess' own wedding was but a mean thing relatively speaking, a generous impulse...Though I imagine Pall would prefer to do her own wedding planning and choose her own attendants.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Addison De Witt Pepys shoots down one of Fletcher's best...Ouch.

Rather sweet how Sam's and Elizabeth Knipp's relationship has progressed...Much as he has to watch it given Bess' jealousy, there seems a sincere shared love of the theater between them developing into a friendship, despite sexual overtones, which have faded surprisingly on Sam's part at least. She seems to honestly enjoy his company and sharing the backstage gossip with a true lover of the stage and he clearly relishes it.

How poor Bess feels at having him pay so much attention to another woman who can offer such fascinating info to him, we can guess at.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"she says that the King first spoiled Mrs. Weaver, which is very mean, methinks, in a prince,"
I'm intrigued by the definition of "spoiled" here. Does this mean that Mrs Weaver was a respectable married woman (before being ruined)as opposed to Moll and Nell who were just actresses and no better than they ought to be (to quote my late grandmother).

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Bess, take that comb away and do it yourself.

On the other hand, poor Betty Michell gets a break.

David Vaeth   Link to this

Completely off topic, but if you don't mind, Phil, i'd like to tout another daily blog called "Disunion", sponsored by the NYTimes. It began this past October and is, like this diary blog, a day-by-day parallel to events past, in this case the American Civil War -- for this purpose, October 2010 was October 1860. So, today's entry is about January 12th, 1861. Various contributors throughout the week and always, in my opinion, fascinating.
website ==> http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/category/d...

Christopher Squire   Link to this

DV: the excellent 'Disunion' site has been mentioned here already: http://www.pepysdiary.com/archive/1667/11/01

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Spoiled
Tony, I read this to mean he took her virginity. I don't know whether that's right or not.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

Paul and Terry, thanks for your comments and the annotation on Mrs Weaver. I had made the old mistake of assuming that 'Mrs' implied a married woman.

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