Monday 18 November 1667

Up, and all the morning at my office till 3 after noon with Mr. Hater about perfecting my little pocket market book of the office, till my eyes were ready to fall out of my head, and then home to dinner, glad that I had done so much, and so abroad to White Hall, to the Commissioners of the Treasury, and there did a little business with them, and so home, leaving multitudes of solicitors at their door, of one sort or other, complaining for want of such despatch as they had in my Lord Treasurer’s time, when I believe more business was despatched, but it was in his manner to the King’s wrong. Among others here was Gresham College coming about getting a grant of Chelsey College for their Society, which the King, it seems, hath given them his right in; but they met with some other pretences, I think; to it, besides the King’s. Thence took up my wife, whom I had left at her tailor’s, and home, and there, to save my eyes, got my wife at home to read again, as last night, in the same book, till W. Batelier come and spent the evening talking with us, and supped with us, and so to bed.

9 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"here was Gresham College coming about getting a grant of Chelsey College for their Society, which the King, it seems, hath given them his right in"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelsea_College_(1...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“here was Gresham College coming about getting a grant of Chelsey College for their Society, which the King, it seems, hath given them his right in”

Interesting that Samuel Pepys, FRS, writes like an outsider.

MILD SPOILER. In 1669 a third Charter was given [the Royal Society], granting to the Society lands in Chelsea in which were situated Chelsea College. The site could have provided a permanent home for the Society, but no funds were forthcoming for the necessary building, and the college remained vacant. In 1681, under Wren's presidency, the lands were sold back to the King as a site for his Royal Hospital. http://royalsociety.org/about-us/history/royal-...

andy   Link to this

perfecting my little pocket market book of the office

Is this the book with varnished paper - that we felt was some sort of "ready reckoner" book of tables? Could be useful for mast heights * weights, or prices for rope per furlong, or something similar?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Bess?"

"Yeah?"

"Are you sure you're reading 'Fuller's History'?"

Holds up book...

Hmmn...

"It really says 'Raoul, his manly chest bare, stealhily approached the chamber where the sleeping Miranda lay, exposed to the night under a thin blanket, her ample bosum heaving with her disconsolate sorrow...'?"

"Uh... 'Cardinal Raoul...'."

"Ah...That explains it." nod. "Carry on, dear."

Bess pulls open to hidden copy of favorite French novel tucked inside Fuller volume.

djc   Link to this

"“here was Gresham College coming about getting a grant of Chelsey College for their Society, which the King, it seems, hath given them his right in”

Interesting that Samuel Pepys, FRS, writes like an outsider."

Greasham College ('their Society') is not the same institution as the Royal Society.

Mary   Link to this

the little pocket market book.

An L&M footnote suggests that this may have been the notebook containing prices for victualling provisions 1660-1661 and 1664-1667 (listed in Rawl. D 794).

Mary   Link to this

more expense at the tailor's

A delightful note in L&M shows that the purchase of two yards of pure, fine, black cloth and five yards of cloth was made by Pepys (or his wife?) on this day. This is recorded in the ledgers of the draper, Sir William Turner. The cost came to £6 and the bill was settled on 29th December. (Pepys clearing his debts before the end of the year, we presume).

nix   Link to this

"but they met with some other pretences" --

in this time and context, "pretences" probably meant no more than "claims", without a connotation of spuriousness.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

djc, I find and concede that Pepys was an outsider and misunderstood a plan by the Royal Society to secure Chelsea College and its grounds for permanent quarters (it wasn't Gresham College where Robert Hooke still lived).

"On the 27th September, 1667, the Society took possession of Chelsea College45 [ 45 The College was delivered up to the Society by Evelyn, who writes in his Diary, Sept. 24, 1667, " I had orders to deliver the possession of Chelsea College (used as my prison during the war with Holland, for such as were sent from the Fleete to London) to our Society, as a gift of His Majesty, our Founder." ], which was in a most dilapidated condition; but, as the grant of the building and land had not passed the great seal, it was resolved, "that all repairs should be deferred until the Society obtained legal possession of the premises." This appears to have been regarded as extremely doubtful; and although Dr. Sprat speaks, in his history, of the College as intended to serve for the Society's meetings, laboratory, repository, and library, yet the Council resolved, that subscriptions should be set on foot for the purpose of building a College, " as the most probable way of the Society's establishment." With this view [ a ] subscription was drawn up [ but failed to be fulfilled ]."

*A history of the Royal society, with memoris of the presidents* By Charles Richard Weld, pp. 204ff. http://is.gd/hqT2r

Cp. *The History of the Royal Society of London*, By Thomas Birch, Vol. II, pp. 205f. et ad rem.

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