Sunday 25 August 1667

(Lord’s day). Up, and to church, and thence home; and Pelling comes by invitation to dine with me, and much pleasant discourse with him. After dinner, away by water to White Hall, where I landed Pelling, who is going to his wife, where she is in the country, at Parson’s Greene: and myself to Westminster, and there at the Swan I did baiser Frank, and to the parish church, thinking to see Betty Michell; and did stay an hour in the crowd, thinking, by the end of a nose that I saw, that it had been her; but at last the head turned towards me, and it was her mother, which vexed me, and so I back to my boat, which had broke one of her oars in rowing, and had now fastened it again; and so I up to Putney, and there stepped into the church, to look upon the fine people there, whereof there is great store, and the young ladies; and so walked to Barne-Elmes, whither I sent Russel, reading of Boyle’s Hydrostatickes, which are of infinite delight. I walked in the Elmes a good while, and then to my boat, and leisurely home, with great pleasure to myself; and there supped, and W. Hewer with us, with whom a great deal of good talk touching the Office, and so to bed.

13 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

25th August, 1667. After evening service, I went to visit Mr. Vaughan, who lay at Greenwich, a very wise and learned person, one of Mr. Selden's executors and intimate friends.

http://bit.ly/9x1fLY

tg   Link to this

A more benign Sunday than last week's dramatic hatpin incident but still Sam is on the prowl, stopping in at two churches to check out the pretty ladies. And poor Sam to pursue Betty Michell only to find out it was her mother. Time and strategy wasted.

Michael L   Link to this

Why would Sam see only the end of her nose for a long time, and not her whole face? Would women have been wearing a large bonnet or something like that?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

In an Anglican church a woman might well wear a head-covering, e.g.:

http://www.kipar.org/baroque-costumes/images/co...

language hat   Link to this

"to the parish church, thinking to see Betty Michell; and did stay an hour in the crowd, thinking, by the end of a nose that I saw, that it had been her; but at last the head turned towards me, and it was her mother, which vexed me"

Ha! If he weren't so driven/addicted, that might teach him a lesson.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

After kissing Frances Udall Sam must certainly have been vexed with the misrecognising of noses. I think it hilarious.

cum salis grano   Link to this

Head covering was very important in the nave as it kept man from thinking of his own enjoyment and think of more important ideas, but a practical vicar would allow good grooming to be on display as it kept the pews full and the churches income flowing.
Man loves to see beauty, 'tis always better than hearing a dull sermon or homily.

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...which had broke one of her oars in rowing..."
her --- boat or rower?

Michael L   Link to this

"Boyle’s Hydrostatickes, which are of infinite delight"

Well, I'm sure it has its interesting bits. But does anyone else really find fluid dynamics to be a rollicking good time?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"so I back to my boat, which had broke one of her oars in rowing, and had now fastened it again; "

Sounds as if the oars are secured to a single thole pin, perhaps tied with rope, rather than in a rowlock formed by a pair of pins.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

walked to Barne-Elmes, ... , reading of Boyle’s Hydrostatickes, ..."

Am intrigued by SP's ability to read a complex text while walking, and what is more over a surface that would not be completely smooth but would require peripheral attention at a minimum if he were not to stumble.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“Boyle’s Hydrostatickes, which are of infinite delight”

Pepys is interested in water-pumps used both onboard and in raising ships and seems interested in elementary physics (as we'd call it).

Robert Gertz   Link to this

That unmistakable Howlett nose...

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