Thursday 10 January 1666/67

Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon home and, there being business to do in the afternoon, took my Lord Bruncker home with me, who dined with me. His discourse and mine about the bad performances of the Controller’s and Surveyor’s places by the hands they are now in, and the shame to the service and loss the King suffers by it. Then after dinner to the office, where we and some of the chief of the Trinity House met to examine the occasion of the loss of The Prince Royall, the master and mates being examined, which I took and keep, and so broke up, and I to my letters by the post, and so home and to supper with my mind at pretty good ease, being entered upon minding my business, and so to bed. This noon Mrs. Burroughs come to me about business, whom I did baiser …

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“… maister and Mates being examined-which I took and keep. And so broke up, and I to my letters by the post; and so home and to supper with my mind at pretty good ease, being entered upon minding my business; and so to bed. This noon Mrs. Burroughs came to me about busi[ness], whom I did besar and haza ella tocar mi chose.>”

http://www.pepys.info/bits5.html

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the bad performances of the Controller’s and Surveyor’s places by the hands they are now in"

namely, the hands of Sir John Mennes http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2463/
and Sir William Batten http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/852/

A. Hamilton   Link to this

"His discourse and mine about the bad performances of the Controller’s and Surveyor’s places by the hands they are now in, and the shame to the service and loss the King suffers by it."

The plot thickens. But does Sam realize the risk he is running by doing his bit to close the "mistress gap"?

Meeting of Mennes, Batten, Burroughs. Take it away, R. Gertz.

CGS   Link to this

"the master and mates" such a modern term, not Captain and his Lieutenants,
Aped from the Captain Smith Seamans Grammar and Dictionary . page 42 [orig 34].

The Captains Charge is to command all, and tell Maf[s]ter to what port he will go, or to what Height. In a Fight he is to give Direction for managing thereof, and the Master is to f[s]ee the cunning of the Ship, and , trimming of the Sails

Master and mates:
are to direct the course, command all the Sailors, for Steering , Trimming and Sailing the Ship;his mates are only hid [sic] Seconds, allowed f[s]omtimes for the two Mid-Ships-Men, that ought to take charge of the fir[s]ft prize.
The Pilot when they make Land doth take charge of the Ship till he bring her to Harbour.

Lieutenant [last entry in the list sailing jobs] was a separate rank and was sent up to the forcastle .

PS>
The long S was very similar to the f in that the long S had half a cross while the f had a full cross tick.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Nice to know Mrs. Burroughs goes the extra mile for a good customer.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Shudder! Shudder. Bleeugh! Yuck!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

What's especially charming is that Sam might not recommend the poor woman now to some potential husband.

"Cooper...I know the widow Burroughs is a handsome girl in her way and her husband was a fine man but..."

"Argh...Mr. Pepys, what be ye sayin'? Is it me one-eye?"

"Cooper...You're an educated man, an old friend, and former mentor before my rise to the heights of adminstrative heaven carried me far above such mere mortals as you... You deserve a good and virtuous wife. So I feel I must warn you..."

"Argh...Damaged goods, Mr. P?"

"I have heard...Talk, Cooper."

"I cannot believe it, sir. Burroughs spoke of the woman so highly always."

"Ah, Cooper...Naive Cooper...In this vile world, even a good woman may be forced to...Well..." sigh.

"Tis the fault of evil men, sir. She's not to be blamed..."

"Noble, Cooper. Noble. But...If the woman is willing to allow herself to be...Lowered in such fashion. Hardly a fitting wife for a man like you, Cooper. An old friend whom I would never wish to see hurt."

"On the other hand..." Sam beams. "My sister Pall..."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Now of course, to be fair, it's very likely the Bagwells, or at least William, set out to use Sam by throwing Mrs. Bagwell at him after noting his interest. Mrs. Burroughs was at least primed (if her campaign was not planned out) by her friend Betty Martin who knows Sam and his desires quite well. But...

(feel free to take over here...)

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