Saturday 4 August 1666

Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and, at noon to dinner, and Mr. Cooke dined with us, who is lately come from Hinchingbroke, [Lord Hinchingbrooke] who is also come to town: The family all well. Then I to the office, where very busy to state to Mr. Coventry the account of the victuals of the fleete, and late at it, and then home to supper and to bed. This evening, Sir W. Pen come into the garden, and walked with me, and told me that he had certain notice that at Flushing they are in great distraction. De Ruyter dares not come on shore for fear of the people; nor any body open their houses or shops for fear of the tumult: which is a every good hearing.

5 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"De Ruyter dares not come on shore for fear of the people; nor any body open their houses or shops for fear of the tumult:"

L&M say this was a canard, and that Tromp would be blamed for the Dutch fleet's failure in the St. James Day Battle [Tweedaagse Zeeslag].

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Interesting to see Penn and Sam drawing together at this time...Circling the wagons, perhaps? They are after all the two most effective members of the Navy Office.

cgs   Link to this

Supper : it be a summer thing for this summer, I failed to find previous years that Samuell enjoyed late snacking calling his nightly repas supper. and then retiring on a full tumtum.

cgs   Link to this

'twas ducky

'L&M say this was a canard, and that Tromp would be blamed for the Dutch fleet’s failure in the St. James Day Battle"
Samuell did use the word canard so missed OED>
OED
Littré says Canard for a silly story comes from the old expression ‘vendre un canard à moitié’ (to half-sell a duck), in which à moitié was subsequently suppressed. It is clear that to half-sell a duck is not to sell it at all; hence the sense ‘to take in, make a fool of’. In proof of this he cites bailleur de canards, deliverer of ducks, utterer of canards, of date 1612: Cotgr., 1611, has the fuller vendeur de canards a moitié ‘a cousener, guller, cogger; foister, lyer’. Others have referred the word to an absurd fabricated story purporting to illustrate the voracity of ducks, said to have gone the round of the newspapers, and to have been credited by many. As this account has been widely circulated, it is possible that it has contributed to render the word more familiar, and thus more used, in English.
[I saw the word in print before 1850 (J.A.H.M.).]
1864

1. intr. To fly abroad as a false report.
1862

Nix   Link to this

L&M say this was a canard --

"In time of war, the first casualty is truth."

(Attrib. variously to Aeschlus, Dr. Johnson, U.S. Sen. Hiram Johnson, and anonymous)

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