Friday 16 February 1665/66

Up betimes, and by appointment to the Exchange, where I met Messrs. Houblons, and took them up in my coach and carried them to Charing Crosse, where they to Colonell Norwood to see how they can settle matters with him, I having informed them by the way with advice to be easy with him, for he may hereafter do us service, and they and I are like to understand one another to very good purpose. I to my Lord Sandwich, and there alone with him to talke of his affairs, and particularly of his prize goods, wherein I find he is wearied with being troubled, and gives over the care of it to let it come to what it will, having the King’s release for the dividend made, and for the rest he thinks himself safe from being proved to have anything more. Thence to the Exchequer, and so by coach to the ‘Change, Mr. Moore with me, who tells me very odde passages of the indiscretion of my Lord in the management of his family, of his carelessnesse, &c., which troubles me, but makes me rejoice with all my heart of my being rid of the bond of 1000l., for that would have been a cruel blow to me. With Moore to the Coffee-House, the first time I have been there, where very full, and company it seems hath been there all the plague time. So to the ‘Change, and then home to dinner, and after dinner to settle accounts with him for my Lord, and so evened with him to this day. Then to the office, and out with Sir W. Warren for discourse by coach to White Hall, thinking to have spoke with Sir W. Coventry, but did not, and to see the Queene, but she comes but to Hampton Court to-night. Back to my office and there late, and so home to supper and bed. I walked a good while to-night with Mr. Hater in the garden, talking about a husband for my sister, and reckoning up all our clerks about us, none of which he thinks fit for her and her portion. At last I thought of young Gawden, and will thinke of it again.

17 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the King's release for the dividend made"

28 January, Lord Sandwich "hath got over his business of the prizes, so far as to have a privy seale passed for all that was in his distribution to the officers, which I am heartily glad of; and, for the rest, he must be answerable for what he is proved to have." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/01/28/

"Mr. Moore with me, who tells me very odde passages of the indiscretion of my Lord in the management of his family, of his carelessnesse, &c., which troubles me, but makes me rejoice with all my heart of my being rid of the bond of L1000, for that would have been a cruel blow to me."

Mr. Moore was agent in the clearing of the bond on 31 January. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/01/31/

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"I walked a good while ... and will thinke of it again."

L&M indicate this is an addition crowded between the daily entries.

Jesse   Link to this

"...of his carelessnesse, &c"

I'm somewhat surprised that Pepys wasn't more aware of this despite the reduced intercourse w/his Lordship.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the reduced intercourse w/his Lordship."

He may not have seen him so much, but the Diary references have held up.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/112/#ref...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

I guess it's a question of quality-time, and access to what Mr. Moore has long been in a better position to know.

cape henry   Link to this

"With Moore to the Coffee-House, the first time I have been there, where very full, and company it seems hath been there all the plague time." This is one of those maddening details Pepys constantly supplies that one wishes he had described more fully. Given the plague angle, what an interesting place that must have been.
Also Pepys doesn't make clear whether it is the First Time he has been there or his first return following the plague period.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"talking about a husband for my sister, and reckoning up all our clerks about us, none of which he thinks fit for her and her portion"

I thought Samuel was setting up Pall with Philip Harman, upholsterer, of Cornhill. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/01/25/

Ruben   Link to this

Coffe House
In 1665 there were many Coffee-Houses in London, and for that reason we do not know where Pepys went in this day.
Samuel had been exposed to cafeine for all of the Diary Period and had it a lot of times.
There was Will's Coffee House (see Michael Robinson's annotation of 4 feb 2007). Sam went there already the 1 January 1659 and 3 days later he went twice in a day to have a coffee (in one of them with Cheshire cheese!).
- Friday 23 January 1662/63: "Thence to Mr. Grant... and he and I to a coffee-house, where Sir J. Cutler was...". Note he writes "A coffee-house" and not "THE coffee-house", as they were many already.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

“With Moore to the Coffee-House, the first time I have been there"

L&M believe Pepys means this is his first visit since he went down to Greenwich (as Ruben argues), that "the Coffee-House" (his regular) is one near the Royal Exchange; that he was last there on 24 May 1665. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/05/24/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...to the Exchange, where I met Messrs. Houblons, and took them up in my coach and carried them to Charing Crosse, where they to Colonell Norwood to see how they can settle matters with him, I having informed them by the way with advice to be easy with him, for he may hereafter do us service, and they and I are like to understand one another to very good purpose."

What has Sam been reading lately? "The Godfather" via a time hole? Or perhaps "The Prince"?

"James, you and your brothers Houblon are men I Respect. The Colonel too is a man of Respect who understands the value of...Friendship. Favor is freely rendered when Friendship is sealed by... Respect. When such men of respect meet together, mutual understanding is assured...As we understand each other." Knowing nod.

"What was Pepys saying, James?" "I haven't the foggiest, though I am sure it will cost us something."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

A clerk for Pall?

I dunno, Hewer doesn't want to marry anyone (but Bess), and Taylor's married I think as is Hayter but Mr. Gibson seems like a sturdy, dependable fellow.

"Mr. P., have you not a sister, called Paulina, fair and virtuous?"

"I have a sister, Gibson, called Paulina."

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...to the Coffee-House, the first time I have been there, where very full, and company it seems hath been there all the plague time...."

sounds like a scene from a zombie movie.......

Robert Gertz   Link to this

So...Does coffee ward off plague? Caffeine chase off fleas? Or does coffee attract Pepysian flea-repellent types?

Or perhaps...The zombie movie explanation...

"To the armpits, sir, chest and stomach..." Patron hastily reveals clear torso, bulbo-free, no signs of fever or cough. "In you out, sir."

You...The house guard eyes feverish-looking young man... "Coffee, grrr...No bulbo..." waves arms.

"Sorry, sir..." clubs young man back.

Another patron dodges plague victim, submits to exam... "In you go, my lord."

Er...Sigh to pretty lady following...

"No ladies, me lord."

Hmmn...Nobleman eyes now rather frantic lady as horde of plague victims mills about.

Chivalry has its place...Still, one can not dispense with some essentials of life.

"Have a wait in the coach, my dear." Points to coach where driver is fighting off horde of long-decaffeinated and therefore, angry, plague-victims.

language hat   Link to this

I drink coffee three times a day and have not gotten the plague. QED.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Thank you RG! Thought you might respond in your usual wonderful style!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"my coach"

I assume this is a rental?

cgs   Link to this

Just a hire for the day from one Avis Hurts, under the sign of Hurt Byrd.

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