Saturday 22 April 1665

Up, and Mr. Caesar, my boy’s lute-master, being come betimes to teach him, I did speak with him seriously about the boy, what my mind was, if he did not look after his lute and singing that I would turn him away; which I hope will do some good upon the boy. All the morning busy at the office. At noon dined at home, and then to the office again very busy till very late, and so home to supper and to bed. My wife making great preparation to go to Court to Chappell to-morrow. This day I have newes from Mr. Coventry that the fleete is sailed yesterday from Harwich to the coast of Holland to see what the Dutch will do. God go along with them!

12 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"My wife making great preparation to go to Court to Chappell to-morrow."

Since Sam does not mention an invite from friends...Though he sometimes fails to record such...I assume this is his treat for Bess.

parvomagnus   Link to this

Didn't the fleet sail yesterday yesterday?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Didn’t the fleet sail yesterday yesterday?"

Yo, parvomagnus, Mr. Coventry is a day behind, or his mail is.

CGS   Link to this

Court Chappell , a special service?, all the bonnets out in force, best bib and tucker and all that?

Mary   Link to this

Indeed a special day.

April 23rd is both St. George's Day and also the anniversary of Charles II's coronation. In Restoration England, save for the wished-for birth of a male heir to the throne, days wouldn't come much more special than that.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

Yay Mary, for telling us betimes, and in time.
Happy St George's Day, and the joyous day of Restoration, to all with best wishes for the slaying of dragons and begetting of heirs.

Rex Gordon   Link to this

St. George's Day

Happy SGD, everybody! I happened to watch Question Time for the Prime Minister this morning, and noticed that the Tories all wore red roses in their lapels, the Lib Dems and Labour did not. Has St. George's Day become some sort of political issue?

jeannine   Link to this

"Up, and Mr. Caesar, my boy’s lute-master, being come betimes to teach him, I did speak with him seriously about the boy, what my mind was, if he did not look after his lute and singing that I would turn him away; which I hope will do some good upon the boy."

Ok, just so I am clear here --if Tom doesn't practice his lute -does Sam stop having Mr. Caesar come or does Sam "fire" Tom?

Having been in the Sam position, I've held firm that I won't pay for music lessons, etc. if practice isn't done. Perhaps now, Sam has a better 'tough love' approach where if the kid who won't practice then they are turned out? If so, in today's world, if everyone adopted the Sam model, I can only imagine the influx on social services for those little 'tweens' who won't do their lessons and get the boot from home! But then again, with Sam's love of music I suppose it is only fair to cast off anyone who can't carry a tune or at least strum a lute!

CGS   Link to this

Sam will find a new willing Lutist and this one can go and find another palliass or go be a lamp holder singing bass on a damp evening, be my take. Fresh face youths be a farthing a dozen.

Mary   Link to this

Agreed, it's the boy who will be under notice of dismissal if he doesn't do his practice. There's no point in Sam paying for the lessons if the pupil won't follow through. Mr. Caesar is given a little more authority by being made the instrument of Sam's displeasure.

Michael L   Link to this

Having had children taking music lessons, I suspect that practice time, not instruction, is indeed the problem here. I would bet that the practical result of Sam's threat to Caesar will be that Sam is effectively delegating to Caesar the task of basting the boy for not doing his practice.

Pedro   Link to this

"if he did not look after his lute and singing that I would turn him away;"

Not another for Barbados I hope.

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