Friday 26 August 1664

Up by 5 o’clock, which I have not been many a day, and down by water to Deptford, and there took in Mr. Pumpfield the rope-maker, and down with him to Woolwich to view Clothier’s cordage, which I found bad and stopped the receipt of it. Thence to the ropeyard, and there among other things discoursed with Mrs. Falconer, who tells me that she has found the writing, and Sir W. Pen’s daughter is not put into the lease for her life as he expected, and I am glad of it. Thence to the Dockyarde, and there saw the new ship in very great forwardness, and so by water to Deptford a little, and so home and shifting myself, to the ‘Change, and there did business, and thence down by water to White Hall, by the way, at the Three Cranes, putting into an alehouse and eat a bit of bread and cheese. There I could not get into the Parke, and so was fain to stay in the gallery over the gate to look to the passage into the Parke, into which the King hath forbid of late anybody’s coming, to watch his coming that had appointed me to come, which he did by and by with his lady and went to Guardener’s Lane, and there instead of meeting with one that was handsome and could play well, as they told me, she is the ugliest beast and plays so basely as I never heard anybody, so that I should loathe her being in my house. However, she took us by and by and showed us indeed some pictures at one Hiseman’s, a picture drawer, a Dutchman, which is said to exceed Lilly, and indeed there is both of the Queenes and Mayds of Honour (particularly Mrs. Stewart’s in a buff doublet like a soldier) as good pictures, I think, as ever I saw. The Queene is drawn in one like a shepherdess, in the other like St. Katharin, most like and most admirably. I was mightily pleased with this sight indeed, and so back again to their lodgings, where I left them, but before I went this mare that carried me, whose name I know not but that they call him Sir John, a pitiful fellow, whose face I have long known but upon what score I know not, but he could have the confidence to ask me to lay down money for him to renew the lease of his house, which I did give eare to there because I was there receiving a civility from him, but shall not part with my money. There I left them, and I by water home, where at my office busy late, then home to supper, and so to bed. This day my wife tells me Mr. Pen,1 Sir William’s son, is come back from France, and come to visit her. A most modish person, grown, she says, a fine gentleman.

  1. William Penn, afterwards the famous Quaker. P. Gibson, writing to him in March, 1711-12, says: “I remember your honour very well, when you newly came out of France and wore pantaloon breeches.”

25 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

Hiseman's, a picture drawer, a Dutchman.

For his pictures see...

http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/person.asp?Li...

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Pedro, thanks for the link, which I've replicated under Huysman's own space in the Encyclopedia.

One of Huysman's portraits is of the three daughters of Thomas Crew, who were John Crew's grandchildren and Edward and Jemima Montagu's nieces.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

We finally have a resolution to a question discussed in the pronoun parsing party for the 3 August 1664 entry. Those who selected Penn's daughter rather than Falconer's as the potential would-be heir to some of Falconer's estate win the pool (I lost).
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/08/03/

Australian Susan   Link to this

Whilst looking at Huysmans'portraits, I came across this - Lady Castlemaine's child from 1661:
http://www.royprecious.co.uk/
And here is a lovely collection of 17thc portraiture.
http://www.philipmould.com/InternalMain.asp
Here is the Francis Stuart "like a soldier"
http://oil-paintings.com.au/htmlimg/image-24260...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Wild young Will Penn back from France with his modish ways...Visiting our Bess?

"Young Penn? Here?"

"Oh, yes and quite the modish one...A throughly polished gentleman."

"Indeed..." slightly narrow look from Hewer as well as Sam.

"It was such a pleasure to talk to him. He's so well acquainted with all the latest fashions in Paris."

Hewer eyes Sam, Sam, Hewer.

"And all the latest dances..." slight gleam in Bess' eye.

That got him...she notes to herself happily.

"No. Oh, no. No more dance lessons!" Sam hastily notes, waving.

"Sam'l. They'd be free. And William would only come over when you're not here. So as we wouldn't...Bother you."

Hmmn, he catches her faint smile.

Methinks me fair one be enjoying this...As would... Pictures young Penn regaling Penn Sr. with tales of neighbor Pepys' jealousy. Hmmn...

William?

Still, best to avoid giving ammunition.

"If the young Mr. Penn is so kindly inclined, by all means enjoy yourself, dear."

Clearly this 'fashionable' son of my sworn enemy shall bear careful watching...Grim and narrow stare Pennward.

Hewer beside Sam giving equally grim and narrow look toward the lair of his new enemy.

"Thank you, dear. It will be so nice to talk with a such a fascinating young man in a language the maids can't understand." Bess, innocent look.

***

jeannine   Link to this

Portrait of Frances Stuart

"...pictures at one Hiseman's, a picture drawer, a Dutchman, which is said to exceed Lilly, and indeed there is both of the Queenes and Mayds of Honour (particularly Mrs. Stewart's in a buff doublet like a soldier) as good pictures, I think, as ever I saw. The Queen is drawn in one like a shepherdess, in the other like St. Katherin, most like and most admirably.'

I've broken this into two entries due to length -this will cover the references to Frances Stuart's portrait by Jacob Huysman referred to today and those pertaining to Catherine will follow.

Susan has provided a web link to the painting of Mrs. Stewart. The portrait appears in Hartmann's bio of her "La Belle Stuart". At the time of the book's printing, 1924, Hartmann states that the portrait was in the collection of H.M. the King at Buckingham Palace. I do not know where that portrait is today, but here are a few description notes and a description.

Hartman's biography discusses the authenticity of the portrait (as so many portraits of the time were poorly labeled and then believed to be of famous people. "The authenticity of the portrait on His Majesty's collection at Buckingham Palace is incontrovertible. The picture was seen by Pepys in Jacob Huysman's house on August 26th, 1654: 'Mrs Stewart in a buff doublet like a soldier'. In James II's Catalogue it is mentioned as: 'no. 465. By Houseman, Dutchess of Richmond in man's apparel, half-length. It has been engraved as a frontispiece for the "Iconographia Scotica,' Johnson sel, Rivers scupl, 1796."

Hartmann also explains that "this curious and fascinating portrait is now in the Royal Collection at Buckingham Palace. Frances is habited as a man, with golden periwig and gold-hilted sword. He buff doublet is adorned with bows of blue ribbons, and the outer sleeves are decorated with strips of dull golden braid." He goes on to explain that "Masquerading in male attire seems not to have been uncommon among the ladies at Court in this region.". Quite honestly when compared to the exquisitely beautiful and feminine Lely portrait that Sam saw on July 15th , linked to here http://www.kipar.org/period-galleries/paintings... the Huysman portrait is 180 degrees different, totally nonsexual, with Frances appearing as a young man.

jeannine   Link to this

"Journal of the Earl of Sandwich" edited by R.C. Anderson

26th Friday. Calm, easterly wind. At sunset we took the sun's magnetical amplitude which was 11 [degree] 00' from W. towards the north, which calculated the true amplitude of the sun was 10[degree] 30', so that the needle seems to vary eastwardly 00[degree] 30'.

jeannine   Link to this

Huysman's portraits of Catherine

Huysman, a Dutchman, was the Queen's favorite painter, which some believe was due to his Catholicism. The beautiful portrait of Catherine as St. Catherine is provided here
http://www.vmfa.museum/rule/huysmans_catherine.... with an interesting commentary on that portrait here http://www.vmfa.museum/rule/rule_commentaries.h...

I have not been able to find a web link to the actual portrait of Catherine as a Shepherdess, although it is beautifully reprinted in Manuel Sousa's biography "Catherine of Braganza: Princess of Portugal, Wife of Charles II", which is a most lovely illustrated biography of Catherine with an exquisite collection of portraits and art concerning her.

An accurate and thoughtful description of the Shepherdess portrait follows (link reference is below): "The ... very beautiful portrait of the Queen as a shepherdess can be seen today in the King's dining room at Windsor Castle in an elaborate Grinling Gibbon's frame. The mood of the painting would appear recreational; the ducks at her feet might reflect her interest in birds - she kept her own aviary, importing parrots and cockatoos from India. She wears silvery white, rose and blue, and a broad - brimmed hat pinned with a butterfly brooch. Her hair hangs long and loose. It was de rigueur at the time to be painted in this 'timeless' pastoral gear to avoid being quickly dated by changing fashions. But 17th century paintings often have hidden symbolism. She also holds a crook and her left hand rests on a lamb with a fair-haired boy tipping flowers over its back. The lamb is associated with innocence, gentleness, patience and humility. It is also symbolic of Christ the shepherd, and with his sacrifice for mankind. Catherine had all the foregoing qualities, and she may have identified particularly with the Good Shepherd in her duties as leader of the Catholic faith in England. Why else is the boy showering the lamb with flowers, rather than herself?" The link from where this quoted also shows some other lovely works of Catherine. http://www.queensroyalsurreys.org.uk/queen_of_r...
Both of the Huysman portraits referenced today and this one by Huysman at the NPG http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/portrait.asp?... catch a softness and sense of serenity from Catherine and magnificently capture her gently devoted spirit. During a time of more "looseness" in Court paintings and oft times a formal 'royal' rigidity in others, these painting of Huysman's, and one other from the Sousa book located in Lisbon (sorry no link), present her in a consistent soft, gentle style. Perhaps his style and representations of her in this highly flattering manner, along with his Catholicism, were good cause for the Queen to favor him.
(Note: Any additional information about other Huysman's portraits or links are always appreciated and I'd gladly include them in the portrait listings on her editorial page with thanks to the finder! http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2381/

jeannine   Link to this

Catherine's portrait

Tried to post info on Catherine's portrait but it got held up in annotation limbo-hopefully Phil will put it through!

Cum Grano Salis   Link to this

RE:Edward and Jemima Montagu nieces painting, it be after the style, actual brush be used by one William Vincent I believe?

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Could someone help with a few things?

1) "There I could not get into the Parke, and so was fain to stay in the gallery over the gate to look to the passage into the Parke, into which the King hath forbid of late anybody's coming, to watch his coming that had appointed me to come, which he did by and by with his lady and went to Guardener's Lane"

Okay, so I followed this well enough to figure out that he's not talking about the King, but about meeting someone else ... whom he never mentions by name! Could someone please remind me who is helping Sam look for a companion for Elizabeth?

and...

2) "I was mightily pleased with this sight indeed, and so back again to their lodgings, where I left them, but before I went this mare that carried me, whose name I know not but that they call him Sir John, a pitiful fellow, whose face I have long known"

Is this transcribed accurately? It seems as if there are words missing. Could someone with access to L&M help?

Thanks!

Terry F   Link to this

Mr. Penn, Sir William's son, modish today at 20; in two years a Quaker convert. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Penn

Cum Grano Salis   Link to this

My take, the king closed the gates to that little park that Samuell likes to see some unmentionables by the sun dial. Thus he went by circuitous route to the rooms of his Lordship to obtain his french maid but got fobbed off with a second string from the caste off french court.
As for Sinjon, it be an old nag that has known many better days.

Terry F   Link to this

"There I could not get into the park; and so was fain to stay in the gallery over the gate to look to the passage into the park (into which the King hath forbid of late anybody's coming) to watch his [of him the] coming that had appointed me to come; which he did by and by with his lady. And we went to Guardener's Lane &c."

So L&M clarify it, Todd -- since punctuation is mostly editorial.

Terry F   Link to this

"But before I went, this man that carried me, whose name I know not but they call him Sir John, a pitiful fellow, whose face I have long known but upon what score I know not --"

Here, Todd, methinks L&M fixed errors of more than one kind.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... some pictures at one Hiseman's,..."

"Mrs. Stewart's in a buff doublet like a soldier"
Millar 'Tudor, Stuart and Early Georgian Pictures in Collection of H. M. Queen (1963) #291

[A miniature portrait by Samuel Cooper of Francis Stewart In Male attire, circa 1664, half length, shows the identical costume and hair -- now Royal Collection, Windsor. Its one of Cooper's most refined works; strongly modeled, exquisitely colored and with a softness and delicacy about the features, Miss Stewart is entirely feminine and thoroughly alluring --the defect Jeannine notes above are those of Huysmans and not the sitter's attire or the genre. Alas there is no reproduction I can locate on the web.]

"The Queene is drawn in one like a shepherdess,..."
Recorded in the Mss inventory of Charles II pictures in the 'Queen's Gallery' at Hampton Court & now at Windsor. (Exhibited, Virginia Museum, Richmond, "Rule Britannia" April 28 - Aug 12 2007) Millar, (1963) # 289.

"...This elaborate confection is the fullest epitome of Huysmans' style, which is more nearly allied to what one may call Continental Catholic Baroque than Lely's Protestant idiom. It is full of allegorical reference. The Paschal Lamb was the Queen's emblem and the Cupid is probably an allusion to the child of whom she was, in 1664, hopefully expecting to become the mother. In the background other Cupids disport themselves and one , who is flying recurs in other Huysmans ... the color also with its metallic lustre and the sharp, tortured folds, is wholly unlike Lely. With a view to annoying the Queen, the Duchess of Cleveland had Lely paint her in a very similar pose, in a picture now only known from Sherwin's engraving ... " Ellis Waterhouse 'Painting in Britain 1530-1790' (1978) 4th ed. p. 104, reprod. (B&W) pl. 87

"... like St. Katharin,"
Recorded as being in store at Whitehall in Charles II inventory, another version now at St. James Palace. Millar (1963) #290.

Reproduced: mezzotint, published 1678/9 by Richard Tompson, after Jacob Huysmans (1664)
http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/portrait.asp?...

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Thanks, Terry! The second one was definitely a typo, then. But do we know whom Sam actually met and went to Guardener's Lane with?

Bradford   Link to this

Superb rendering of silk in Huysman's Catherine as Catherine. Tangential, but not uninteresting: cherubs in art are also known as putto/putti. Is there a technical name for these wingèd cherub heads sans bodies?

Terry F   Link to this

"But do we know whom Sam actually met and went to Guardener's Lane with?" Alas, no, Todd. L&M note (complain?) that Pepys has not told us about *this* appointment to find a musical companion for Elizabeth.

Pedro   Link to this

What's in a picture.

Thanks to Jeannine and Michael for the information, however I don't think that there is any Dan Brown type hidden symbolism, as the Queen's Regiment site mention, in this particular picture.

The picture was painted in 1664, and at this time Catherine has shown no inclination that "she may have identified particularly with the Good Shepherd in her duties as leader of the Catholic faith in England." In fact I don't think she ever considered herself in such a role.

She had caused the raising of eyebrows by sending representations for certain persons to the Pope, but the letters were sent with the blessing of the King. I believe that the content of the picture would also be approved by the King. (She also sent one to the Pope asking for recognition of her country as an independent state, to no avail.) It is true that her mother had reminded in a letter of her duties as a Catholic in England, but had warned her not to upset the English Protestants.

Catherine and the Paschal Lamb

The Old Tangier Regiment was renamed the Queen's Regiment in her honour on return from 22 years duty in Tangier,

"The Regiment was generally known as "Kirke's Lambs" after 1685, but whether this is an ironical tribute to the atrocities with which they are credited after the defeat of the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion or because of their regimental crest of a Paschal [Passover] lamb, or because of a remark by Col. Kirke where he referred to his men as his 'Lambs' shortly after the Battle of Sedgemoor, is unclear. The Paschal Lamb was confirmed as the Ancient Badge (in other words, it had previously been displayed) of the Regiment in 1751 but it's origins are uncertain. It was a common religious symbol of St. John the Baptist, and one of the two churches on Tangier was dedicated to this saint, and Queen Catherine also had a personal devotion to St. John. It may be that the lamb became the unofficial symbol of the regiment whilst in Tangier. Although some historians have claimed that it derived from the Arms of the house of Braganza, and that it was displayed by 1684, there is absolutely no evidence of this. The earliest instance of the Lamb on display is on the Grenadiers' caps of 1715 (and here it is a plain lamb, not a paschal one). However, one source says that during its battles against the Moors in Tangier the Earl of Peterborough made his troops wave large flags to indicate they were Christians, and he supposedly chose the Paschal Lamb for this purpose. There is only one reference to the regiment being called the 'Lambs' before 1686 - in the Dictionary of National Biographies, which is usually taken as an accurate record, the entry for Colonel Kirke refers to the Regiment as Kirke's Lambs whilst stationed in Tangier."

http://www.kipar.org/military-history/kirkes_re...

Terry F   Link to this

Pepys on Kirke (further down the page Pedro's link provides)

"Kirke was reputedly a drunken brute who commanded a drunken regiment, but this reputation might be somewhat exaggerated. Samuel Pepys was on Tangiers at this time, and although he was no prude the deepest impression he leaves on the reader of his Journal is disgust at the gross indecency and lurching loutishness of Kirke and his men. The endless dirty stories of the Governor's table-talk passed from the distasteful to the unendurable. In Pepys's view Kirke's manners and morals were reflected in the cruelty and corruption of his administration. There were ugly stories of soldiers beaten to death with no pretence of legality: of Jewish refugees returned to the tortures of the Spanish Inquisition because they could not raise the bribes that Kirke demanded: of rape and robbery and bullying of the citizens and their wives. Kirke personified what Pepys called 'the bestiality of this place'.

"During the truce which followed the siege of Tangier in 1680, Kirke made friends with the Emperor of Morocco, Ismail, who would rule his country for 55 years. 'He would excel all mankind in barbarity and murder, inventing every day a new pastime of cruelty' wrote an Embassy official. He would kill a slave to test the edge of a new weapon, spear a dozen negroes or strangle a woman or two from his harem as a divertissement, and even the lives of his sons were not safe from his cruelty. Despite his hatred of all foreigners, Ismail took a liking to Kirke and swore "there never would be Bullet shot against Tangier, so long as Kirke was in it". They exchanged gifts, the Emperor sending Kirke 12 cows and a Christian woman in return for some Irish greyhounds. Ismail confirmed his vow that if none but Kirke and his wife (Lady Mary Howard, daughter of the fourth Earl of Suffolk) should be left alone in Tangier, he would not betray Kirke.

"Pepys, who disliked Kirke intensely, recorded in colourful, if exaggerated, detail all the gossip and scandal associated with him. He thought he was the most foul mouthed man he had ever met, as he and his officers publicly boasted of their amorous affairs and how they defamed every woman who yielded to their invitations:

*The Governor, Kirke, is said to have got his wife's sister with child and, while he is with his whores at his bathing house, his wife, whom he keeps in by awe, sends for her gallants and plays the jade by herself at home.*

"According to Bishop Ken, the chaplain of Lord Dartmouth's fleet, Kirke caused a scandal by seeking to obtain the post of garrison chaplain at Tangier for a Mr Roberts, the brother of his current mistress. Kirke's morals may have been appalling, but probably no worse than those of many of his contemporaries (Pepys himself demanded sexual favours from women in return for better postings for their male relatives in the Navy!)...."

I'm shocked, shocked! And Kirke's poor little lambs, who had gobe astray, damned from Tangier to eternity.

Pedro   Link to this

The Lamb and the Tiger.

Little lamb, who made thee?
...We are called by His Name.
Little lamb, God bless thee!

Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the lamb make thee?

Pedro   Link to this

Kirke's poor little lambs.

Shocking indeed Terry!

We should make the distinction here, as in many instances, between the ordinary soldiers and the officers. The foot soldier endured a torrid time in Tangier being let down by their officers and suppliers.

Another case of Lions (or Tigers) being led by donkeys!


Glyn   Link to this

When Elizabeth Pepys has her portrait made a few years from now, she will also be depicted as St Catherine. I don't know if there's any significance to that.

St Katherine's dock is right by the Tower of London, so maybe there was a church of that name nearby.

pepf   Link to this

"“But do we know whom Sam actually met and went to Guardener’s Lane with?” Alas, no, Todd. L&M note (complain?) that Pepys has not told us about *this* appointment to find a musical companion for Elizabeth."

Let's call him Sir John L'Inconnu, the pitiful mare-man (A mythical merman)

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