Sunday 7 August 1664

(Lord’s day). Lay long caressing my wife and talking, she telling me sad stories of the ill, improvident, disquiett, and sluttish manner that my father and mother and Pall live in the country, which troubles me mightily, and I must seek to remedy it. So up and ready, and my wife also, and then down and I showed my wife, to her great admiration and joy, Mr. Gauden’s present of plate, the two flaggons, which indeed are so noble that I hardly can think that they are yet mine. So blessing God for it, we down to dinner mighty pleasant, and so up after dinner for a while, and I then to White Hall, walked thither, having at home met with a letter of Captain Cooke’s, with which he had sent a boy for me to see, whom he did intend to recommend to me. I therefore went and there met and spoke with him. He gives me great hopes of the boy, which pleases me, and at Chappell I there met Mr. Blagrave, who gives a report of the boy, and he showed me him, and I spoke to him, and the boy seems a good willing boy to come to me, and I hope will do well. I am to speak to Mr. Townsend to hasten his clothes for him, and then he is to come. So I walked homeward and met with Mr. Spong, and he with me as far as the Old Exchange talking of many ingenuous things, musique, and at last of glasses, and I find him still the same ingenuous man that ever he was, and do among other fine things tell me that by his microscope of his owne making he do discover that the wings of a moth is made just as the feathers of the wing of a bird, and that most plainly and certainly. While we were talking came by several poor creatures carried by, by constables, for being at a conventicle. They go like lambs, without any resistance. I would to God they would either conform, or be more wise, and not be catched! Thence parted with him, mightily pleased with his company, and away homeward, calling at Dan Rawlinson, and supped there with my uncle Wight, and then home and eat again for form sake with her, and then to prayers and to bed.

32 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

When did Pepys see the new boy? Pepys "having at home met with a letter of Captain Cooke's, with which [1] he had sent a boy for me to see, whom he did intend to recommend to me. I therefore went and there met and spoke with him [Cooke]. He gives me great hopes of the boy, which pleases me, and at Chappell I there met Mr. Blagrave, who gives a report of the boy, and [2] he showed me him" -- not that it matters.

Pedro   Link to this

"I showed my wife, to her great admiration and joy, Mr. Gauden's present of plate, the two flaggons, which indeed are so noble that I hardly can think that they are yet mine. So blessing God for it, we down to dinner mighty pleasant,"

It is hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven...

Terry F   Link to this

"I would to God they would either conform, or be more wise, and not be catched!"

I assume he has his man Thomas Hayter, chronic conventicler, in mind.

djc   Link to this

When did Pepys see the new boy?

Pepys goes home to find a letter from Capt. Cooke. Then, as Pepys was not at home when the boy arrived with the letter, Pepys goes to see Cooke. Then at Chappel he meets with Blagrave, who also commends him, and either there or thereafter he is shown the boy by Balgrave.

Terry F   Link to this

Thanks, djc -- very clear now.

cape henry   Link to this

"...manner that my father and mother and Pall live in the country, which troubles me mightily, and I must seek to remedy it." Saddled with the maintenance of two difficult women, it sounds like John Pepys is overwhelmed. What Sam can actually do about this remains to be seen, but I wonder if it makes him more or less likely to bring Pall into his personal family circle?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...then home and eat again for form sake with her, and then to prayers and to bed."

Yeah...It's not hard to see where... "No, thanks. Had some fast food supper with good ole lecherous Uncle Wight your first full day home." ...might not quite work out well.

***

"...sad stories of the ill, improvident, disquiett, and sluttish manner that my father and mother and Pall live in the country, which troubles me mightily, and I must seek to remedy it."

Our Lady Bess lack her comquots and daily racy new novel from France?...or...

"Ppphitutt..." John Sr. in britches and no shirt applauds his perfect shot into the bucket as our Lady Bess and maid make their way into the...urgh...entrance of Brampton Cottage.

"Welcome, daughter. Have a pull on the jug?" John offers jug, settle down whittling.

"Uh...No, thank you father-in-law. Is mother-in-law?..."

"Meg! Pall!! The fancy French city 'hore wife of our boy is here. Hey, there, missie." he nods to maid, giving wide, gap-toothed smile.

Nahhhnn! Bess rearing in horror at the sight of Meg and Paulina in filthy shawls, some odd version of trousers, and badly decomposing straw hats.

"Landsakes. If it ain't little Bessie. C'mere and give ole Meg Pepys a hug, child."

Must I? Bess trembles at the filthy arms extended in greeting...Well slathered in what appears to be pig fat. Newly killed by the look of it, the maid hisses.

"Yo, Bessie. Who be you?" Pall in her rags eyes the maid suspiciously.

"I am Madame Pepys' maid, miss."

"'I am Medamie Pepys' maid.'" Pall mimics, chortling to Meg who joins in.

"Well, well...We are the fancy ones." Meg, laughing while releasing a Bess desperate for escape.

"Wellup...Pull up a chair and we'll be having dinner. Pa, go and fetch the hog, he'll be just about done on the spit outside now."

"Don't forget to cut off the part the dog et, Pa." Paulina calls.

"Eh, you be keepin' that, Pa! We'll use that for the soup tomorrer." Meg calls.

Bon appetit. Bess thinks, blanching.

"Mother-in-law? I'm not hungry. Might we see our rooms?"

"Course, Bessie. Pall, take the ladies up over to their room. The one that we done chased the rats out of last night."

"They was back this mornin', Ma." Pall shakes head.

"Madame Pepys?" the maid hisses as she dutifully follows Bess, following Pall up the muddy stairs. ("Watch out for where the hogs got in and made a...Sor'" Pall shakes head.) I should like to give my notice...Now."

"Think this'll work?" Margaret whispers to John below as they watch Bess' and the maid's feet disappear up the stairs.

Scream from upstairs...

"Yep. Pa, the rats is back!" Pall's voice...

"Oh, yes. We'll be getting another 20Ls per year at least out of him by the time she leaves." John nods.

***

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...I must seek to remedy it."

"Son?" John stares at Sam leading a rather distinguished-looking older gentleman and a genteel-looking older woman to the Brampton Cottage door. As several large workmen continue shoving past, hauling old furniture out and plain yet tasteful new furniture in.

"Ah, Father." Sam nods,stepping up to him. "Hey, bring back me birdcage!!" Pall runs past, shrieking after a workman.

"Son? What is going on here?"

"Yes. I regret to say, Father that you and Mother have not exactly lived up to what we would say at Court were 'expectations' of how the parents of His Majesty's Clerk of the Acts should conduct themselves. I'm sure you'll understand that I must act to maintain my position and therefore...However much it does pain me...I must seek to...Replace you."

"Son?" Margaret now joining them.

"Yes, Mother. I'm afraid you must all leave. I've fortunately found suitable replacements for you in these distinguished retiring actors from the Duke's House." Distinguished retiring actors bow courteously. "In exchange for portraying you, they will be receiving the free use of the cottage and so you must be off."

"But, son? Where would we go?" John stares.

"Hardly my concern, ex-father. I should inform you that I cannot allow you to resume your trade at the old house in London should that thought occur. Hardly good to have two sets of Pepys parents wandering about, eh? Naturally I'll contribute oh, say 10Ls to see you off. I highly recommend the Continent. English fashion is sure to be new there. Well, time is money and Bess is waiting for me at home."

"But...What about me?" Pall, returned in triumph with battered birdcage, workman nursing sore head, behind her.

"Easier to erase you from existence, dear. Just a matter of blotting you out of the family Bible." Sam notes. "Well, that didn't take up too much time. Ta, ta, all."

"You are blocking the way to my kitchen." the distinguished older actress informs the staring Margaret.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"I am to speak to Mr. Townsend to hasten his clothes for him, ..."

At the time, and on state occasions today, the children of the Chapel Royal wore a distinctive red livery as laid down in a warrant of Charles II's of 17 September 1661. On departure they were provided with a replacement suit of clothes from the wardrobe.

Includes a photo of the 'children' in their livery:
http://www.royal.gov.uk/OutPut/Page3254.asp

Music and the Chapel Royal:
http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page2827.asp

John Rutter -- Psalm 150 -- includes the Chapel Royal in Livery:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJoaaRHLpYQ

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"Mr. Gauden's present of plate, the two flaggons, which indeed are so noble that I hardly can think that they are yet mine. So blessing God for it,..." '

'or be more wise, and not be catched!' -- like SP!

Terry F   Link to this

"he do discover that the wings of a moth is made just as the feathers of the wing of a bird,"

Such discoveries were all the rage. Robert Hooke's *Micrographia* (1665) also includes Observ. 46 Of a white Moth (pp. 185-196) A description of the seathers and wings of this, and several other Insects (197, 198) Divers Considerations about the wings, and the flying of insects and Birds. http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k98770v

Australian Susan   Link to this

RG's last entry is reminiscent of a Jasper Fforde novel.

PHE   Link to this

Interesting to see the use of the word 'constable' given that the Met police force was not created until 1829. Web searches show they were linked to the military at this time. The following seems apt for the Diary's context:
"It was the constables duty to protect and maintain the tranquility enjoyed by the citizens of a community where good order reigns among its members, any intentional violation of which was considered a breach of the peace." (http://www.youbeenserved1.com/constablehistory.htm)

Chris   Link to this

"RG's last entry is reminiscent of a Jasper Fforde novel."

Did Jasper Fforde write mindless twaddle too?

Jacqueline Gore   Link to this

I thought things at Brampton seemed to be going too well. So Margaret and John are not getting on too well? Or was Bess being clever, choosing the one word 'sluttish' to describe their care of the place that she knew would set Sam off?

(Dr. G, I think you may have hit the nail on the head, if the bad meat service to the Sandwich girls early was also part of John Sr's plan. But the second part, "Sam's Solution to the Minor Parental Problem" was a delight-likely what our hero would at times love to be able to do. The descendants of those distinguished actors wouldn't be available by any chance?)

Jacqueline Gore   Link to this

I thought things at Brampton seemed to be going too well. So Margaret and John are not getting on too well? Or was Bess being clever, choosing the one word 'sluttish' to describe their care of the place that she knew would set Sam off?

(Dr. G, I think you may have hit the nail on the head, if the bad meat service to the Sandwich girls earlier was also part of John Sr's plan. But the second part, "Sam's Solution to the Minor Parental Problem" was a delight-likely what our hero would at times love to be able to do. The descendants of those distinguished actors wouldn't be available by any chance?)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

So Tom Edwards has come...One of the most charming personalities to join our cast however lightly Sam sketches him. And the return of our Jane is not far off...

Poor Wayneman...

jeannine   Link to this

Poor Wayneman...

As much as it's always "nice" to hear when things are going well in Sam's household (ie. new 'good' help), it's so much more fun to read about when things aren't going so well! I always delighted in reading about the troubles of Wayneman, and ALWAYS smile when I open the page for the day and see names like Balty, Captain Ferrers, Dr. Pierce (gossip central) etc. highlighted in the entry as one never knows what to expect! In addition to the antics that some of Sam's relatives, acquaintances, etc. bring along, they also tend to elict from Sam a breadth of refreshing adjectives and descriptions as Sam records his thoughts! So, I guess I'll look forward to Tom Edwards, but, there is a little part of my heart pining for the safety of Wayneman and still sad that we'll hear no more of him. Every good 'story' deserves a little 'comic relief'.

Bradford   Link to this

Second Honeymoon. Note that summering in the sticks has not lowered Elizabeth's standards. But are the wings of moths really feathered (or similarly structured) in any wise as birds' are?

cape henry   Link to this

Moth wings are actually covered with tiny, powdery scales. Among other properties, the scales repel water and give the wings a slippery quality, making it more difficult for predators to hold on. In both these roles, the scales work a bit like graphite. Under the microscope, these little scales do resemble feathers a bit and in addition, they are usually highly colored, individual elements of the moth's particular wing design.

Rex Gordon   Link to this

Yes, Aussie Susan -

...while RG's first post summons up memories of Kate Beckinsale (as "Robert Post's child") first meeting the repulsive inmates of Cold Comfort Farm.

Cactus Wren   Link to this

"So up and ready, and my wife also, and at long last we both out of our bed and dressed ... "

jeannine   Link to this

while RG's first post summons up memories of Kate Beckinsale (as "Robert Post's child") first meeting the repulsive inmates of Cold Comfort Farm.

Gee Rex, I looked up the L&M translation and you were absolutely right. It reads: "she telling me sad stories of the ill, improvident, disquiett, and sluttish manner that my father and mother and Pall live in the country,and that she saw something nasty in the woodshed"....

JonTom Kittredge   Link to this

"Did Jasper Fforde write mindless twaddle too?"

Yes, he does. Gloriously fun twaddle. You should take a look; you might like it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eyre_Affair.

Pedro   Link to this

"the ill, improvident, disquiett, and sluttish manner that my father and mother and Pall live in the country, which troubles me mightily, and I must seek to remedy it."

Well Sam, now that you get two monkeys a year, why not give them four ponies allowance.

Terry F   Link to this

The Eyre Affair URL minus the trailing dot
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eyre_Affair

Pedro   Link to this

"but, there is a little part of my heart pining for the safety of Wayneman and still sad that we'll hear no more of him."

Don't worry about our Wayneman, he was barbadoed after the 14th of November 1663 and missed the Great Plague of locusts.

He is probably in Jamestown, far away from London Town and the rain, in the arms of a rich plantation owner's daughter. He raises a glass of the local rum.

"Up yours Pepys, this is much better than having my whey with the maids."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

What a delight if we ever find he changed his name to Scott...

Ruben   Link to this

Wayneman was last seen in a plantation, coping with mosquitoes, fever, little food and a lot of work. He was promissed 7 years of that and later we will see.
Another possibility is he will reappear in the next Fforde novel as the impossible lover of Fat Boy.

Australian Susan   Link to this

I enjoy Jasper Fforde novels.
I enjoy RG's annotations
Comparing the latter with the former was to refer to these facts, not to criticise.
[An aside: do people know that JF pretends to have written a book called "The Great Samuel Pepys Fiasco? (it's a joke within his latest book)Having found that out, I do wonder if he lurks around here.....Hello? Hello? Anyone bookjumped recently??]

Cactus Wren   Link to this

I also greatly enjoy Mr. Gertz's annotations, and must now go and check out the works of Jasper Fforde.

pepf   Link to this

"When did Pepys see the new boy?

Pepys goes home to find a letter from Capt. Cooke. Then, as Pepys was not at home when the boy arrived with the letter, Pepys goes to see Cooke. Then at Chappel he meets with Blagrave, who also commends him, and either there or thereafter he is shown the boy by Balgrave."

Nice and ingenious (or rather ingenuous?), but that's not what SP himself is telling us. He wasn't *out* when the boy arrived to be inspected, he was *up*!
"... we down to dinner mighty pleasant, and so up after dinner for a while, and I then to White Hall, walked thither, having at home met with a letter ...".
The reason why he didn't see the boy then must have been that big "DO NOT DISTURB" sign on his bedroom door while he was expanding on this morning's first task "for a while".

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