Sunday 12 June 1664

(Lord’s day). All the morning in my chamber consulting my lesson of ship building, and at noon Mr. Creed by appointment came and dined with us, and sat talking all the afternoon till, about church time, my wife and I began our great dispute about going to Griffin’s child’s christening, where I was to have been godfather, but Sir J. Minnes refusing, he wanted an equal for me and my Lady Batten, and so sought for other. Then the question was whether my wife should go, and she having dressed herself on purpose, was very angry, and began to talk openly of my keeping her within doors before Creed, which vexed me to the guts, but I had the discretion to keep myself without passion, and so resolved at last not to go, but to go down by water, which we did by H. Russell —[a waterman]— to the Half-way house, and there eat and drank, and upon a very small occasion had a difference again broke out, where without any the least cause she had the cunning to cry a great while, and talk and blubber, which made me mighty angry in mind, but said nothing to provoke her because Creed was there, but walked home, being troubled in my mind also about the knavery and neglect of Captain Fudge and Taylor, who were to have had their ship for Tangier ready by Thursday last, and now the men by a mistake are come on board, and not any master or man or boy of the ship’s company on board with them when we came by her side this afternoon, and also received a letter from Mr. Coventry this day in complaint of it. We came home, and after supper Creed went home, and I to bed. My wife made great means to be friends, coming to my bedside and doing all things to please me, and at last I could not hold out, but seemed pleased, and so parted, and I with much ado to sleep, but was easily wakened by extraordinary great rain, and my mind troubled the more to think what the soldiers would do on board tonight in all this weather.

16 Annotations

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

For the first time, I pity poor John Creed ... it's never good to be a third wheel in those situations.

And I pity poor Sam, troubled by the knavery and neglect of the deliciously named Captain Fudge (something tells me he never became a privateer ... not exactly a name to strike fear in the hearts of men or women) and Captain Taylor. The best-laid plans, etc.

Clement   Link to this

"poor John Creed"
It also strikes me how intimately these people knew and associated with each other. Even though their relationship was historically about their Lord's business, it wasn't unusual for them to travel and sleep in the same bed, or apparently to be a companion observer through several hours of marital dischord, with out withdrawl or dismissal. Truly a different type of business relationship that we are used to now.

Sam's troubled mind for "what the soldiers would do on board tonight in all this weather" provide evidence that he is truly taking his administrative responsibilities seriously (not solely as a means to personal enrichment) and that he's in for years of stress ahead, considering how frequently logisitcal difficulties in meshing men and materiel seem to occur in the business of war (or "national defense" as it is now called).

cape henry   Link to this

This may be the most prolonged and intimate domestic scene in the diary to date.I do not, off hand, recall any written with such detail and fullness or with such a complete arc.Extraordinary.

JWB   Link to this

Capt. Fudge
Terry F.'s foresight:
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/01/12/

Louise H   Link to this

Cape Henry, for fans of prolonged and intimate Pepysian domestic scenes, with detail, fullness, and complete arc, this one's hard to beat: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/01/09/.

Terry F   Link to this

A domestic PM, after a long morning spent studying shipbuilding.

Are we to gather that Sir J. Mennes (sic) wants to be no less godfather than Pepys -- so two of them; that Lady Batten was to be Thomas Griffith's godmother; that Mennes sought an "other" (alter) for her; and that Elżbieta nominated herself; etc.?

cape henry   Link to this

Thanks, LH - I think you're right. I did not recall that one. Also, TF asks a very good question: what's going on there in that passage?

Terry F   Link to this

Interesting and not surprising that the Navy Office doorkeeper, William Griffith, intended that our congenial man be godfather of his son. The Office patronage of Thomas by the officers still in London that I take it Sir J. Mennes envisions is perhaps appropriate, given what glimpses we've had of his father's service.

How common would multiple, unrelated godparents be? Could the Anglican liturgy of 1662 accommodate Sir J. Mennes's scenario? (I'm guessing "probably.")

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"My wife made great means to be friends, coming to my bedside and doing all things to please me, and at last I could not hold out, but seemed pleased, and so parted, and I with much ado to sleep..."

Parted? Hmmn...The Pepyses don't seem to be sleeping together much these days.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...which we did by H. Russell --[a waterman]..."

An Immortalized waterman... I wonder how many important figures of the day, long forgotten, gnash their teeth at this passage.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...my mind troubled the more to think what the soldiers would do on board tonight in all this weather."

"Sidney? Ain't these the best lodgin's ye ever had?" one soldier snugly nestled in his hammock below decks pokes his mate in the hammock above.

"Aye, William. Haven't had such a comfortable berth since I lived at home. And no bastard of a captain or a master to order us about. 'Tis Heaven.

"Not to mention me wife." chuckle.

"Mates? More of this hot drink from the unguarded stores?" a comrade passing with steaming mugs pauses. "Aye, George, thank ye. My God, tis good. What do they calls it again?"

"Tis coffee from the Americas...The hold's loaded with it. Anyone for more fresh bread and fine cheese, likewise left unguarded? Drenched in the tastest spices of the East?"

"Oh, no more, thanks George, I've had me fill. I tell ye Sid, tis a night in Heaven."

"Aye. And listen to that lovely rain on the decks above. Reminds me of when I was a wee boy safe at home."

"Anyone like a warm toddy? There be plenty left from the captain's cabin. And grab a blanket if ye need one."

"Thank ye, Sarge, I will to both." Sidney calls.

Bradford   Link to this

What mischief does Sam suppose they could get up to on board, short of scuttling the ship? Irreverent vision of hardened types on deck, square-dancing to mouth music.

Nate   Link to this

What mischief does Sam suppose they could get up to on board, short of scuttling the ship?

Well, it depends if there are stores on board, they can be used or stolen and sold. Any piece of rigging, line, sail, hawser, block, chain, anchor, tool, board, etc. could be fair game. Anything not nailed down or that can be broken loose.

With the ship in port there will be people on board attempting to sell things to any one on board and to buy things as well if it looks as if they can get away with it.

I've seen this sort of thing.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I think Sam's honestly (and honorably) concerned for the men. And if it were me in command of those poor fellows left like that, I'd break into the hold and take anything for my men, selling whatever I could if necessary to get them food and shelter and let the clerks (or the CoA) sort it out later. As many a good commander has done and will do.

Pedro   Link to this

"and my mind troubled the more to think what the soldiers would do on board tonight in all this weather."

Poor old Sam he probably would not know that this is as good as it gets for the men on board, and off to the Forgotten Colony. At least the pressed men (in theory) would have only three years to serve and then be discharged. That is of course if they survive.

In January 1662 there were about 3000 men and numbers fell steadily throughout 1662, due as Peterborough thought, to their sloth, but probably due to the unprepared state of the expedition. The Portuguese had hardly left a house fit for habitation, and what buildings there were were broken up for firewood. A diet of salt meat caused malnutrition and sickness, whilst the officers spent most of their time bickering and neglecting their duty. In the first 9 months 605 men were lost to sickness and enemy action.

Following the defeat of Teviot the strength had dropped to 1400, one half of the garrison had died.

(info from The Army of Charles II by Childs)

Cumsalisgrano   Link to this

"I've seen this sort of thing." 'wot' not be tied down, is up for grabs, it be called perks,found this
for the other boot, it be a spoiler, but it be how others see us.

Castle Rising, Samuel Pepys, Esq; once a Taylor, then Serving Man to the Lord Sandwich, now Secretary to the Admiralty, got by Passes and other illegal Ways 40000 l.

From: 'An argument for a petition for a new Parliament', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 5: 1713-1714 (1742), pp. 15-30. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com.... Date accessed: 14 June 2007.

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