Wednesday 11 February 1662/63

Took a clyster in the morning and rose in the afternoon. My wife and I dined on a pullet and I eat heartily, having eat nothing since Sunday but water gruel and posset drink, but must needs say that our new maid Mary has played her part very well in her readiness and discretion in attending me, of which I am very glad. In the afternoon several people came to see me, my uncle Thomas, Mr. Creed, Sir J. Minnes (who has been, God knows to what end, mighty kind to me and careful of me in my sickness). At night my wife read Sir H. Vane’s tryall to me, which she began last night, and I find it a very excellent thing, worth reading, and him to have been a very wise man. So to supper and to bed.

16 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"At night my wife read Sir H. Vane’s tryall to me, which she began last night, and I find it a very excellent thing, worth reading, and him to have been a very wise man."

Sam'l's continuing fascination with and admiration of Sir Harry Vane's very Puritan person and end on 14 June 1662 http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/06/14/ is of considerable interest, methinks.

Terry F   Link to this

Is this what Sam'l calls "Sir H. Vane’s tryall"?
http://www.bartleby.com/268/3/13.html

daniel   Link to this

god bless that Mary and what she had to see today.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Did not checkout the rash "....our new maid Mary has played her part very well in her readiness and discretion in attending me, of which I am very glad..."

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

"...My wife and I dined on a pullet and I eat heartily,..."
I wonder if Samuell when eating this delectable meal, did say to Eliza this be fine poule, perfect for a Charles soiree.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

The previous evening...

"And I, Sir Henry Vane, testify that it is my unshaken belief, my brethren, that one day Parliament will shake itself free of the blight of these wretched kings and their worthless hangers-on and once more..." Bess pauses in midsentence, dropping book to floor at a knock. The bedroom door thoughtlessly left ajar.

"Sir...Madam? Will ye be wanting anything more?"

"Uh, nothing else Mary, thank ye." Sam gives cheery smile. Which vanishes with the closing of the door.

"Oh, God...Bess. We are dead, dead! Why did you let me make you read that damned thing?! Throw it into the fire, girl!! Now, now!"

"Sam'l. I'm sure the girl won't mention it even if she remembers the name."

"My brilliant career...Dashed to ruins on the sharp edges of that dratted Vane's manuscript! Oh, God...Oh, God...Oh, God!"

"Darling, you're still ill. Stop it Sam'l, you'll aggrivate your old wound!"

"Oh, God...Oh, God. Why hast Thou forsaken Thy Servant, Sam'l?! Bess, quick...Offer her money, a larger room to herself...Me!"

"She can have you." Frown... "Now stop fretting Sam'l! The girl probably doesn't even know the man's name."

"I think she'd've gotten the 'cast off these wretched kings' bit! Oh, God...Oh, God...Arrrgh...Excuse me."

"Ye be needin' any help in there?..." Mary's voice.

"You better be about to say, no." Bess glares.

Terry F   Link to this

Robert Gertz, you have an unwarranted wiretap across time and space, into a bedroom and to conversants that no longer exist. Do you also have Vane’s manuscript, the complete manuscipt, or did Sam'l secret it away?

stolzi   Link to this

It must have been poor Mary
who had to do the clystering.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

There be great doubt that it be William Wayneman, opportunity for sweet revenge? Susan be the cooke, could be do the brewing up and Elizabeth would rather be reading so it is left to Young Mary to do the honors of having her master over the bed and administering the said klister, as she be so use to emptying the Potty also.
It was usually, the first major test, to see if thy want to be a nurse in the old days. First day for the trainee, be go and give a bed bath or the bed pan to the old coot in bed 7 or if lucky an enema,as he be bed bound.

Terry F   Link to this

"Sir J. Minnes...has been, God knows to what end, mighty kind to me and careful of me in my sickness"

What hath Sir J. Mennes wrought?
- he has visited the always-visiting-gouty Penn Sam'l;
- by insisting Sam'l use his Venice treacle, he has asserted his seniority and superiority -- methinks to THAT end be's been 'mighty kind'.

Mennes's motives seem as transparent as Sir W. Warren's, which Sam seemed not to question as much as did we all. I think Sam has had the impression there has been some bad blood between them.

Am I missing something here?

Miss Ann   Link to this

"our new maid Mary has played her part very well in her readiness and discretion in attending me" - poor Mary, didn't she read the Job Description very carefully, I will now be on the lookout for "clyster" on any new job I apply for! (I would have probably thought of tennis myself previously.)
I hark back to Sam's lack of intake of a variety of vegetables, this would probably assist his well-being enormously, a little bit of roughage to go with all that protein that he devours (and a regular bath would be beneficial too).

jeannine   Link to this

"our new maid Mary"...obviously Wheatley made a massive mistake in his translation, today's entry should have read "Saint" Mary....

Bradford   Link to this

As my little town was under a Boil Order for a week, and in order merely to wash the dishes once a day I had to start heating water on the stovetop an hour in advance, I have gained new respect for a household where all hot water required a great deal of effort. If it takes 4 gallons just to worsh dishes, Lord knows how long it would take St. Mary to fill up the hipbath for Mr. Pepys.

Pauline   Link to this

'worsh dishes'
Dear Bradford, your small town in Missouri speaks like my small town in Worshington. This very day I was (again) made jest of here in the metropolis (Seattle) for saying 'worsh".

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: Mennes' motives

Terry, I think that Sam's beliefs about "bad blood between them" go back to the time when Sam was "improving" his house, and there were disagreements between them about who would get which room, who was blocking whose light, etc...

Sam has always seemed suspicious of Mennes, but it's been hard for me (with the Diary as my only view) to see exactly why. But he sure doesn't like him. Perhaps he fears his influence, and feels he has little control over him?

Terry F   Link to this

"I will now be on the lookout for 'clyster' on any new job I apply for!"

Miss Ann, whatever they may say, here are some tell-tale signs of it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clyster

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