Thursday 8 August 1661

Early in the mornink to Whitehall, but my Lord Privy Seal came not all the morning. At noon Mr. Moore and I to the Wardrobe to dinner, where my Lady and all merry and well. Back again to the Privy Seal; but my Lord comes not all the afternoon, which made me mad and gives all the world reason to talk of his delaying of business, as well as of his severity and ill using of the Clerks of the Privy Seal. In the evening I took Mons. Eschar and Mr. Moore and Dr. Pierce’s brother (the souldier) to the tavern next the Savoy, and there staid and drank with them. Here I met with Mr. Mage, and discoursing of musique Mons. Eschar spoke so much against the English and in praise of the French that made him mad, and so he went away. After a stay with them a little longer we parted and I home.

29 Annotations

A Hamilton   Link to this

Mornink

A day of ill humors.

Louis   Link to this

"my Lord comes not all the afternoon, which made me mad and gives all the world reason to talk of his delaying of business, as well as of his severity and ill using of the Clerks of the Privy Seal."

How would The World know---apart from a few disgruntled customers---unless the Clerks broadcast it? Ill humours, indeed.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...but my Lord Privy Seal came not all the morning...Back again to the Privy Seal; but my Lord comes not all the afternoon, which made me mad and gives all the world reason to talk of his delaying of business, as well as of his severity and ill using of the Clerks of the Privy Seal."

Geesh and after poor Mr. Moore went running to Sam last night to get him to be there on time...Ill using, indeed...Aristocratic jackass!

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Mons Eschar" Last week it was Mr Whore
now we have Monsieur Eschar!Is he trying to be funny?

vicente   Link to this

"Mornink": & there be I, doth think that it was Bow Bells be in 'is speech.
souldier [soldier] separates the one who pushes doggedly on from the one that unites [solder] [metals of course]
No talk of saddle sores?

vicente   Link to this

London doth attract many from beyond Calais straits. Many a person doth like their title, be wot it may, and they doth insist that thee use it too, none of that equality clap trap by those fanatiques. As noted by Sam, The ferrignier did get in our Mr Mage's goat [throat] royally .

daniel   Link to this

Mornink

surely this is quite antiquated, no? I have not encountered this type of variant before in English.

Mary   Link to this

L&M reads 'morning' not 'mornink'

so the latter could be a mis-scanning error.

Matthew   Link to this

Mad:
this meaning of the word has largely, if not completely, died out in England.

Mary   Link to this

mad

This usage may have died out in certain areas or within certain age-groups, but is still commonly to be heard, at least in the south of England.

Anthony   Link to this

Mad = angry, presumably. Surely this is commonplace in UK and USA , not just southern England?

Bob T   Link to this

mad
This expression is in common every day use in North America, and has been for as long as I can remember.

Matthew   Link to this

Mad:
It seems I was too categorical, but a Google on "Mad" restricted to U.K. sites yielded no examples of this usage in the 1st 10 pages, whereas a search restricted to U.S. sites yielded 4.

David A. Smith   Link to this

"and in praise of the French that made him mad"
Regarding the question about whether it still means angry, to quote Peter Finch from Network, "I'm mad as hell and I'm not gonna take it any more!!"
Following are the many derivations of mad=angry in common US parlance:

'Boiling mad'
'Hopping mad'
'So mad he can't see straight'
'Madder than a wet hen' (Language Hat, please analyze!)

And as for someone becoming mad when hearing speech against the English and in praise of the French ... well, Mr. Mage seems entirely well named!

Glyn   Link to this

"I'm mad about my flat"

In UK English - I'm delighted with my apartment.

In US English - I'm angry about my flat tire (tyre).

Glyn   Link to this

The shorter Oxford English Dictionary gives the definition of "mad" as:

Definition 3 "Carried away by enthusiasm, wildly excited, infatuated". Definition 4 "Beside oneself with anger, moved to uncontrollable rage, furious."

In contrast the British version of the Encarta World English Dictionary transposes them in order of most common use: Definition 1: "Very angry, affected by great displeasure or anger." and only Definition 8 as: "Passionate about something, very fond of, enthusiastic or interested in something" (e.g. golf-mad). So perhaps the most common usages are changing.

In practice Brits use the term for both meanings, hence the old joke "I say, I say, I say I shot my dog yesterday." "Was he mad?" "Well he wasn't very happy about it."

Pedro.   Link to this

In defence of English Musick.

As Mr.Mage is a member of the King's Musick, why did our Sam not back him up, and say that the French guitar musick is (pony and trap as Vincente may say) rubbish?

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/07/27/

Jesse   Link to this

"...of musique Mons. Eschar spoke so much against the English"

From a short biography of English composer John Jenkins (1592-1698) "during the Commonwealth of Cromwell [there was an] absence of much competition or orgainised music-making".
http://www.free-definition.com/John-Jenkins.html

Given the recent history, perhaps there wasn't much Sam could say.

john lauer   Link to this

Webster: eschar
n ... (1543): a scab formed esp. after a burn.

Mary   Link to this

Tight-lipped Sam.

IF Mons. Eschar is the same person as Mons. Esquier ( tentatively suggested by L&M Companion), then Sam's failure to argue on Mage's behalf may simply be politic, as Esquier was servant to Edward Montagu

jean-paul buquet   Link to this

- Are you mad? - I'm furious!
Who can forget Rowan Atkinson's play on the double meaning of "furious" in his legendary sketch 'Fatal Beatings'. Atkinson plays an English school principal who breaks the news to a pupil's father that he personally administered a fatal beating to the boy (for taking out library books without library cards!):
- (to the father) I wondered then as I wonder now if he might not have turned out to be a very different boy indeed if you had administered a few fatal beatings early on.
- (father in disbelief) Are you MAD?
- (Atkinson morally outraged) I’m FURIOUS!!! - in order to accomodate the funeral, I had to cancel afternoon school on Wednesday

and you don’t want to miss the punchline of the sketch. We are not straying too far from Pepys hopefully. By the way, what would have been considered extremely funny in the London of the 1660s? Did they have “humour noir” back then? Does anybody have a good 17th-century joke - and did Pepys ever tell one in his diaries?

Pedro.   Link to this

"funny in the London of the 1660's"

I'm sure someone can enlighten us, but the term "Restoration Comedy" springs to mind.

See also Background for Plays..

http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/289/

Nigel Pond   Link to this

I use "mad" in both meanings cited by Glyn and have done since I was a kid growing up in Manchester. It didn't even cross my mind that either usage may be uncommon depending on one's locale...

Nigel Pond   Link to this

I just thought of a US example of "mad" with the UK meaning: the sitcom "Mad About You". At least I had always assumed it was that meaning...

Ruben   Link to this

Errata:
John Jenkins (1592-1678)

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Mad"
You are all invited to a Mad Hatter tea party...

vicente   Link to this

Don't forget Mr Butler: aka Mons. l'Impertinent; nomen mimicus was, is ,and will be forever. Man will give nom[e]’s deplume [or nom de guerre] for the outrageous and other non standed ‘umans: beside the Chalkies , Dusties, Jumbos and other monikers, the better sort did like to use the latinised or foreign appellations.

Pat stewart Cavalier   Link to this

Either it's a mis scan or it's a scanning error.
Mad : in the concise Oxford English dictionary it gives the 4th meaning as (informal) : very angry

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Either it’s a mis scan or it’s a scanning error. " ?? Methinks Anthony had it. http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/08/08/#c22123

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