Monday 4 June 1660

Waked in the morning at four o’clock to give some money to Mr. Hetly, who was to go to London with the letters that I wrote yesterday night. After he was gone I went and lay down in my gown upon my bed again an hour or two. At last waked by a messenger come for a Post Warrant for Mr. Hetly and Mr. Creed, who stood to give so little for their horses that the men would not let them have any without a warrant, which I sent them.

All the morning getting Captain Holland’s commission done, which I did, and he at noon went away. I took my leave of him upon the quarter-deck with a bottle of sack, my Lord being just set down to dinner.

Then he being gone I went to dinner and after dinner to my cabin to write.

This afternoon I showed my Lord my accounts, which he passed, and so I think myself to be worth near 100l. now. In the evening I made an order for Captain Sparling of the Assistance to go to Middleburgh, to fetch over some of the King’s goods. I took the opportunity to send all my Dutch money, 70 ducatoons and 29 gold ducats to be changed, if he can, for English money, which is the first venture that ever I made, and so I have been since a little afeard of it. After supper some music and so to bed.

This morning the King’s Proclamation against drinking, swearing, and debauchery, was read to our ships’ companies in the fleet, and indeed it gives great satisfaction to all.1

  1. The King’s “Proclamation against vicious, debauched, and prophane Persons” is dated May 30th. It is printed in “Somers’s Tracts,” ed. 1812, vol. vii. p. 423.

14 Annotations

Rita   Link to this

Considering Charles II's reputation for debauchery, this proclamation is highly ironic!

vincent   Link to this

Note 1 goosy gander?

Paul Brewster   Link to this

King's Proclamation
a different take from L&M
“‘A proclamation against debauched and profane persons, who, on pretence of regard to the King, revile and threaten others, or spend their time in taverns and tippling houses, drinking his health … ‘(30 May) … a copy was sent to Pepys on 2 June … It had been occasioned by loyal excesses committed on the King’s birthday (29 May).”

Steve Pillar   Link to this

Any one know what the Post Warrant required for Mr. Hetly and Mr. Creed is all about?

klai   Link to this

Middleburgh -

"The port of Middelburg, on Walcheren Island at the mouth of the Wester Schelde, was an important staging harbour for the trans-shipment of cargoes, particularly English cloth and French wine."
(from Anthony Farrington, "The English Factory in Japan, 1613-1623" p. 251 n.1)

Mike Hudak   Link to this

Post Warrant - "authority to employ posthorses" from Select Glossary - L&M Vol 1 - page 344

helena murphy   Link to this

The King's Proclamation , a copy of which is sent to Pepys ,is received with satisfaction by all as it is an extra tool with which to impose discipline on board ship. A drunken sailor, irrespective of his loyalties, is of little use to the fleet in the now growing professionalism of the Royal Navy.

JonTom Kittredge   Link to this

Post Warrant
I'm still a little unclear on the passage, "[They] stood to give so little for their horses that the men would not let them have any without a warrant". It sounds like if Messrs Hetly and Creed had been able to pay more, the post house would have given them the horses without a warrant. Does that mean the Post Warrant is a requisition to use a government transport for free (or at a discount)?

Nix   Link to this

The post warrant is a guarantee by a government official of payment for, and return of, the horses. It serves the same purpose as giving a credit card impression when you are renting a car -- assurance that the property will be returned, or that there is some source to pay for it beyond your charming smile. The alternative was to leave a large cash deposit, which Hetley and Creed wouldn't or, more likely, couldn't do.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

" I took the opportunity to send all my Dutch money, 70 ducatoons and 29 gold ducats to be changed, if he can, for English money, which is the first venture that ever I made, and so I have been since a little afeard of it."

L&M note the "venture" failed and the change be made in London at Blackwell's on 23 June:.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/06/23/

Terry Foreman   Link to this

In Commons

Members take Oaths.http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=26206#s2

THIS Day the Right honourable James, Marquis and Earl of Ormond, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and Lord Steward of the King's Majesty's Houshold, came into the Lobby, at the Door of the House of Commons; where a Table being set, and a Chair prepared, his Lordship being attended by the Clerk of the Crown, and Wm. Jessop, Esquire, Clerk of the Commons House of Parliament, with the Rolls of such Names of the Commons, as were returned to serve in this present Parliament; his Lordship gave the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance to several Members of the House, (now called by a Cryer) whom he had by his Commission, or Warrant, bearing Date this Day, deputed to administer the same to other Members in his Absence; the Clerk of the Commons House writing down the Names of those to whom the Oaths were so administered; and each Person, so written down, answering to his Name as he was called; the Clerk of the Commons also reading, in the first Place, publickly, the Oath of Supremacy, and, afterwards, the Oath of Allegiance by Parts; and each Member repeating the same.
_____

The form of the Oath of Supremacy and Oath of Allegiance.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Adam   Link to this

I'm not sure that sailors who enjoy drinking, swearing and debauchery (probably most of them) would be satisfied by this proclamation.

Dick Wilson   Link to this

The explanation that the proclamation was aimed at people drinking the King's Health and threatening folks who had better things to do, makes sense.
Otherwise, It is Charles II here, no stranger to ardent spirits, who excelled at debauchery, taking dead aim at two of Pepys' favorite pastimes.

Dick Wilson   Link to this

The explanation that the proclamation was aimed at people drinking the King's Health and threatening folks who had better things to do, makes sense.
Otherwise, It is Charles II here, no stranger to ardent spirits, who excelled at debauchery, taking dead aim at two of Pepys' favorite pastimes.

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