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Manuscript of "I Rise and Grieve", in Lawes's hand

Henry Lawes (5 December 1595 – 21 October 1662) was an English musician and composer.

Life

He was born at Dinton, Wiltshire, and received his musical education from John Cooper, alias Giovanni Coperario. In 1626, Lawes was received as one of the Gentlemen of the Chapel Royal, and held the position until the Commonwealth put a stop to church music. On the Restoration in 1660, Lawes returned to the royal chapel, and composed an anthem for the coronation of King Charles II. He was buried in Westminster Abbey. He was the brother of William Lawes, also a composer.

Works

Lawes published a collection of his vocal pieces, Ayres and Dialogues for One, Two and Three Voyces, in 1653. He followed it with two other books under the same title, in 1655 and 1658 .

Lawes's name has become known beyond musical circles because of his friendship with John Milton, for whose masque, Comus, he supplied the incidental music for the first performance in 1634. The poet wrote sonnet in which Milton describes the great merit of Lawes.

Lawes composed music (melody and unfigured bass) to Edmund Waller's poem "Go Lovely Rose". These are the song and the "Lawes" mentioned in the following line of Ezra Pound's poem "Envoi" which ends the first part of Pound's Hugh Selwyn Mauberley: Go, dumb-born book, tell her that sang me once that song of Lawes: Hadst thou but song as thou hast subjects known, then were there cause in thee that should condone even my faults that heavy upon me lie, and build her glories their longevity.

See also

References

  • Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 
  • Willetts, Pamela J. (1969), The Henry Lawes Manuscript, London: Trustees of the British Museum, ISBN 0714104558 

External links

5 Annotations

Terry F  •  Link

Henry Lawes
LAWES, HENRY (1595-1662), English musician, was born at Dinton in Wiltshire in December 1595, and received his musical education from John Cooper, better known under his Italian pseudonym Giovanni Coperario (d. 1627), a famous composer of the day. In 1626 he was received as one of the gentlemen of the chapel royal, which place he held till the Commonwealth put a stop to church music. But even during that songless time Lawes continued his work as a composer, and the famous collection of his vocal pieces, A yres and Dialogues for One, Two and Three Voyces, was published in. 1653, being followed by two other books under the same title in 1655 and 1658 respectively. When in 1660 the king returned, Lawes once more entered the royal chapel, and composed an anthem for the coronation. of Charles II. He died on the 21st of October 1662, and was buried in Westminster Abbey....
1911 Encyclopedia Britannica article
http://66.1911encyclopedia.org/L/LA/LAWES_HENRY...

Bill  •  Link

Henry Lawes was the friend of Milton and composed the music for "Comus," performed at Ludlow Castle in 1634. He set the anthem, "Zadok the Priest," for the coronation of Charles II. He died October 21st, 1662, and was buried in the Cloisters, Westminster Abbey.
---Wheatley, 1896.

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1660

1662

1665