3 Annotations

Michael Robinson  •  Link

Per L&M Companion:

(c.1603-71) brother of William ( http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/9422/ ). 'The great man,' was originally a protege of the 1st. Duke of Buckingham,
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Villiers,_1st… ) and spent most of his life during two reigns, as Groom of the Bedchamber. During the Civil War he was also paymaster of the royal army. His part in Charles' escape to the Isle of Wight in 1648 lead to the unjustified suspicion that he had also lead the King into a trap. The Cromwellian government had no doubt of his loyalty to the King and kept him for years in prison. In the Diary he often appears as a friend of Cartaret.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

John Ashburnham (MP)

John Ashburnham (1603 – 15 June 1671) was an English courtier, diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1667. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War and was an attendant on the King.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ashburnham_%28M…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

John Ashburnham MP, Groom of the Bedchamber to King Charles -- 1603 - 1671. Brother of William. 'The great man,' was originally a protege of the 1st Duke of Buckingham. During the Civil War he was also paymaster of the royal army. His part in King Charles' escape to the Isle of Wight in 1648 lead to the suspicion he had lead the King into a trap. The Cromwellian government had no doubt of his loyalty to the King so he was arrested in 1654 on a charge of sending money to the exiled Court, and imprisoned in Guernsey until the fall of the Protectorate. In the Diary he often appears as a friend of Cartaret, although his parliamentary activity declined around 1665 because of gout, and in Andrew Marvell's description of the court party in 1666 included:
"Of the old courtiers next a squadron came,
That sold their master, led by Ashburnham."
Ashburnham’s career at Court was unaffected by suspicion of taking gratuities, and aided by the profits from his iron-works he flourished materially until his death on 15 June, 1671. He was buried in Ashburnham church, which, as ‘a great lover of the Church in the right Protestant way’, he had rebuilt since the Restoration. In his will he provided for the repurchase of ancestral lands, but warned his executors against committing sacrilege by the purchase of ecclesiastical estates. As an heirloom he left a watch with ‘an enamel case of imagery which was given me by my late dear master King Charles I’.

Per L&M Companion and https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/…

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1665

  • Dec

1666

1667