5 Annotations

Terry F  •  Link

Heydon, John, b. 1629.
Advice to a daughter: in opposition to the Advice to a sonne; or,
Directions for your better conduct through the various and most
important encounters of this life.
London: Printed by J. Moxon for Francis Cossinet, 1658.

The e-text is available to subscribers to Early English Books Online (EEBO)


Advice to a daughter, in opposition to the advice to a son. Or, directions for your better conduct through the various and most important encounters in this life. Under these general heads: I. Studies, &c. II. Love and marriage. III. Travel. IV. Government. V. Religion. Conclusion. By Eugenius Theodidactus. The second edition. With a word of advice to T.P. London, printed by T.J. for F. Cossinet at the Anchor and Mariner in Tower street, Anno 1659..

Image of John Haydon http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/hst/scie…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

John Heydon AKA Eugenius Theodidactus is mentioned 10 times in annotations, plus referred to as the disguised author of this publication, but never directly mentioned by Pepys by name.

John Heydon (b. 1629, d. after 1670), attorney and writer on astrology, alchemy and the occult, was born in London, the son of Francis Heydon of Sidmouth, Devon, and Mary Chandler of Worcestershire. He was the grandson of Sir Christopher Heydon, author of the influential A Defence of Judiciall Astrologie (1603).

During the Civil Wars Heydon travelled abroad, returning in 1652 to be articled as an attorney at Clifford's Inn. By 1655 Heydon was practising in the Court of King's Bench, writing his first books and practicing astrology, In 1657/58 he was imprisoned in Lambeth House for foretelling Cromwell's death. (Richard Cromwell and John Thurloe went to see him disguised as cavaliers and asked for his prediction; as a result he was imprisoned.)

4 August, 1656 John Heydon married Alice Culpeper, widow of the astrologer–physician, Nicholas Culpeper. He moved into her house in Spitalfields.

In July 1663 John Heydon was again imprisoned for several weeks — this time, despite his staunch royalism, by Charles II for 'seditious practices' (CSP dom., 1663). George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham arranged his release

SPOILER FROM HERE ON: Buckingham stayed in touch because on 23 January, 1667 Heydon was arrested for plotting, the charge being that he had obliged Buckingham by astrologically inferring the date of Charles II's death.

Tantalizingly, the Calendar of State Papers for February 1667 also records 'Astrological predictions on the questions to Peter [sic] Heydon, astrologer of London, as to whether the fanatics shall have toleration in England, and whether the English may be compelled to a neutral place for a treaty of peace'. John Heydon's predictions were apparently in the affirmative.
The record continues with the statement that 'though these answers are according to the rules of his art, he is committed to the Tower for them' (CSP dom., 1666–7, 541).

John Heydon maintained his innocence, and when the evidence became flimsy his case was dropped. It seems to have been an attempt by Arlington to remove his rival, Buckingham — and, therefore Heydon.

At Heydon's arrest, an inventory of his goods noted 500 books, a sword and an expensive watch. The sword and the watch were given to the paid witness against him.

Highlights from John Heydon's biography, https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9… (you need a subscription)

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

For the astrologically minded – as most of Charles II’s contemporaries were – they would have learned that he was born with the Sun in Gemini, Virgo on the ascendant, the Moon and Venus both in Taurus. The celestial picture is dominated by Mercury, indicating a quick intelligence and a restlessness of temperament; there is also an earthy love of pleasure, a stubborn loyalty, and, with Mars in Leo, physical courage. -- King Charles II by Antonia Fraser

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1662