4 Annotations

Wim van der Meij  •  Link

Warrington calls him: De Batteville

Pedro.  •  Link

Vatteville.

According to several sources including Clarendon...

After the marriage treaty was signed on the 23rd June, the only person to excite any opposition was the Spanish Ambassador, Vatteville, who tried to stir up some excitement by distributing papers, stating alarming evils to England likely to occur from a Popish Queen. He was caught in the very act of flinging these papers out of a window to the soldiery and the populace.

Charles ignored his begs for pardon, and hurried him out of the Kingdom.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Spanish Ambassador Carlos, Baron de Vatteville, or Watteville, or Batteville, caused much entertainment in London:

Information from https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catherine_of_Braga…

... in the autumn of 1660 the Portuguese ambassador to London, Dom Francisco de Mello, confident of a successful conclusion to the marriage treaty between Charles II and Catherine of Braganza, returned to Portugal for further instructions.

'A good peace with England was regarded as the only thing under heaven to keep Portugal from despair and ruin' (Maynard to Nicholas, in LISTER'S Life of Clarendon, vol. iii., Appendix, No. lviii.)

In February 1660/61 de Mello was sent back to England to negotiate the union, and rewarded with the title of Conde da Ponte.

But on reaching London the Portuguese ambassador found circumstances had changed. Spanish and Dutch influence had been exercised to thwart the match. George Digby, 2nd Earl of Bristol was doing his utmost to find another alliance acceptable to Spain as well as to Charles.

The Spanish Ambassador to London, Carlos, Baron de Watteville declared that the infanta Catherine, besides being no beauty, was incapable of bearing children (Quadro Elementar, xvii. 152; cf. KENNET, p. 698, for the similar report of the English merchants at Lisbon).

de Watteville offered an equal portion to ANY princess approved of by Spain that Charles II might choose. Protestants were amused by this envoy of the Catholic king urged the importance of a Protestant king marrying a Protestant bride (D'ABLANCOURT, Mémoires, p. 73 sq.)

At last the adoption of the marriage by the French court saved the government of Lisbon from despair.

In November 1660 the Queen Mother came to London to win over Charles II.

In March 1661 Louis XIV sent to England M. de Bastide on a secret mission to press for the conclusion of the marriage treaty.

Finally, on 8 May, 1661 Charles II and Chancellor Clarendon announced to parliament that the marriage negotiations had been completed. The news was favorably received within and without parliament (Calendar of State Papers, Dom. 1660-1, pp. 586, 595);

On 13 May, 1661 an address of congratulation was presented from both houses (Lords' Journals, xi. 241 α, 243 b, 253).

On 23 June, 1661 the marriage treaty was signed (see it in LA CLEDE, Histoire de Portugal, ii. 711).

[According to several sources, including Clarendon: After the marriage treaty was signed on 23 June, 1661 the only person to excite any opposition was the Spanish Ambassador, Carlos, Baron de Watteville, who tried to stir up excitement by distributing papers, stating alarming evils to England likely to occur from a popish Queen. He was caught in the act of flinging papers out of a window to the soldiery and the populace. Charles II ignored his pleas for pardon, and hurried him out of the Kingdom. https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/3118/ ]

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.

References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1661