5 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

tobacco
1.Any of various plants of the genus Nicotiana, especially N. tabacum, native to tropical America and widely cultivated for their leaves, which are used primarily for smoking. 2. The leaves of these plants, dried and processed chiefly for use in cigarettes, cigars, or snuff or for smoking in pipes. 3. Products made from these plants. 4. The habit of smoking tobacco: I gave up tobacco. 5. A crop of tobacco.
ETYMOLOGY: Spanish tabaco, possibly of Caribbean origin.
The American Heritage

dirk  •  Link

King James I wrote a (very short) book...

"And surely in my opinion, there cannot be a more base, and yet hurtfull corruption in a Countrey, then is the vile vse (or other abuse) of taking Tobacco in this Kingdome, which hath moued me, shortly to discouer the abuses thereof in this following little Pamphlet."

"A Covnter-Blaste To Tobacco", by King James I, 1604.

Full HTML version online:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17008/17008-h/1700…

CGS  •  Link

Nice piece, took 400 years to be heard. James I. be wise un, they told him his income be short if they listened to his wise words.

CGS  •  Link

"King James I bans domestic cultivation of tobacco ?' There were many attemps to grow this delightful weed, for it doth grow well in UK., but the problem be in drying it before a nice mold would rot it away.
Hops be easier.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

A contemporary view of life in London is offered by Cosmo, the future Grand Duke of Turin, who visited England in the Spring of 1669.

"It is a common custom with the lower order of people rather than with the nobility, who are less given to it, after dinner or at public houses, when they are transacting business of any kind, to take tobacco, and smoke, so that there does not pass a day in which the artisans do not indulge themselves in going to the public-houses, which are exceedingly numerous, neglecting their work, however urgent it may be; hence it is that the French make fortunes in London, for, being more attentive to their business, they sell their manufactures at a lower price than the English, who would fain derive the same profits as other artisans, however little they work."

@@@

From:
TRAVELS OF COSMO THE THIRD, GRAND DUKE OF TUSCANY,
THROUGH ENGLAND,
DURING THE REIGN OF KING CHARLES THE SECOND (1669)
page 398
TRANSLATED FROM THE ITALIAN MANUSCRIPT
https://archive.org/stream/travelsofcosmoth00maga…

His highness, Cosmo, must be considered only as a traveler. Under his direction, the narrator of the records was Count Lorenzo Magalotti, afterwards Secretary to the Academy del Cimento, and one of the most learned and eminent characters of the court of Ferdinand II.

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1661

1665

  • Jun
  • Nov

1666

1667