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Sir John Trevor (1626 – 28 May 1672) was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1646 and 1672.

Biography

Trevor was a son of Sir John Trevor (d. 1673) of Trevalyn Hall, Denbighshire.[1] His father was a member of parliament under James I and Charles I, and sat also in the parliaments of Oliver and of Richard Cromwell, and was a member of the council of state during the Commonwealth.[2]

In 1646, Trevor was elected Member of Parliament for Flintshire in the Long Parliament and sat until the Barebones Parliament of 1653. Thereafter he was re-elected MP for Flintshire in 1654 for the First Protectorate Parliament, in 1656 for the Second Protectorate Parliament and in 1659 for the Third Protectorate Parliament.[3]

After filling several public positions under the Commonwealth and Protectorate he was a member of the council of state appointed in February 1660 and under Charles II, he rose to a high position. Having purchased the office of secretary of state he was knighted and entered upon its duties towards the end of 1668, just after he had helped to arrange an important treaty between England and France.[2]

Trevor predeceased his father by a year, dying on 28 May 1672.[2]

Family

Trevor married Ruth Hampden, daughter of John Hampden and had a son Thomas who was created Baron Trevor in 1712. One of Trevor's uncles was Sir Sackville Trevor (d. 1633), a naval officer, who was knighted in 1604; and another was Sir Thomas Trevor (1586–1656), one of the judges who decided in favour of the Crown in the famous case about the legality of ship money, and was afterwards impeached and fined.

Notes

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  1. ^ W R Williams The Parliamentary History of the Principality of Wales
  2. ^ a b c Chisholm 1911.
  3. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp. 229–239.

References

3 Annotations

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

After filling several public positions under the Commonwealth and Protectorate, Sir John Trevor (1626 – 28 May 1672) a Welsh politician, was a member of the council of state appointed in February 1660 and under Charles II, he rose to a high position. Having purchased the office of secretary of state he was knighted and entered upon its duties towards the end of 1668, just after he had helped to arrange an important treaty between England and France. Trevor predeceased his father by a year, dying on 28 May 1672.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Sir John Trevor MP (1626 – 28 May 1672) came into new prominence at the fall of Clarendon. He helped to draw up the address at the opening of Parliament on 10 Oct. 1667, and wished to thank the King for dismissing the lord chancellor.
He was appointed to the committee for taking public accounts and considering restraints on juries. Impatient of legal niceties in prosecuting the impeachment of the fallen minister, he was appointed to the committee to draw up the heads of the charges, and acted as one of five managers of a conference on his letter.

During the parliamentary session that began in February, 1668, John Trevor MP was absent on a diplomatic mission to France to conclude the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. He was knighted before he left.

Known to be, like Sir William Temple, a partisan of the Triple Alliance, and described as of great reputation both in Parliament and at Court, Sir John Trevor was coldly received in Paris.

https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/…

For notes on the War of Devolution, see
https://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5855/#c55…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The story of the beautiful Brynkinalt Hall, Chirk, Wrexham, Clwyd, Wales is the story of the Trevor family.

The Trevors trace their history to AD 942 when Tudor Trevor, King of Gloucestershire, married Angharad, daughter of Howel Dda, King of
Wales.

In 1612 Sir Edward Trevor built the main core of the Hall of brick. The
original Jacobean hall, with its richly detailed oak paneling, survives, offering
a wonderful glimpse into the early 17th century world of the Trevor family.
The Great Hall was originally an open courtyard, and coaches entered
through an archway where the staircase now stands.

Marke Trevor was made the 1st Viscount Dungannon by Charles II after he wounded Oliver Cromwell at the Battle of Marston Moor.
https://www.britainexpress.com/attractions.htm?at…

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1667

1668

1669