Annotations and comments

John G has posted 32 annotations/comments since 6 October 2014.

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Comments

About Friday 29 March 1667

John G  •  Link

Heartily agree with you John, and thanks for the back-up Dorothy and Timo.
Wonder how many others out there agree with us (silently)?

About Saturday 30 March 1667

John G  •  Link

I did not know that Pepys wore a 'bun or tea-cake' on his head! Ha ha!
This is the description of a 'Whigg' given when one hovers one's cursor over the 'periwigg' in the first line. Sorry, don't know how to correct this or to whom to refer this.
John G, Sydney

About Monday 19 November 1666

John G  •  Link

Something very strange here.
About two thirds down the diary there is a mention of 'Lord Ossory' and 'Ashly'.
The notes for both seem to have the same picture for both men. A search of Wikipedia also shows the same pictures for both men, unless they are lost identical twins. Some further internet search shows different pictures but I unfortunately do not have the time to verify who is who correctly.
Hope someone can follow up on this research.

About Wednesday 24 October 1666

John G  •  Link

I note that no time was lost in commencing the rebuilding after the fire.
Does anyone know if there was a shortage of artisans and materials for the work to be done?
John G, Sydney

About Monday 12 March 1665/66

John G  •  Link

Yes Jonathon V, I remembered that it was a word, but had completely forgotten its meaning, so I had to look it up again too.
Loved you comment about using it in everyday conversation. Very intriguing idea. I will also try.

About Wednesday 24 January 1665/66

John G  •  Link

Oh, hi there SDS. Thought that a 'roove' must have been an ancient term for something else, then decided that it was a roof.
Cheers. John G, Sydney

About Tuesday 12 December 1665

John G  •  Link

RE: Terry's note of 2015 October 9. 'This was to be understood as a command of the Duke of York, not of the King'.
Yes this surprised me too until I came to the same conclusion as you, as the King is always 'His Majesty' and other royalty ( in this case the Duke of York), 'Royal Highness'.

About Sunday 5 November 1665

John G  •  Link

RG ten years ago:-'here here". Huh? [Where where?]
'Hear hear', please.

Also '...to try and...'?
Please, '...to try TO...'.

About Sunday 8 October 1665

John G  •  Link

Terry, thank you so much for all your excellent extra work in keeping the interesting comments flowing.
John G
Sydney