Summary

The pamphlet was usually attributed to Roger Palmer, Earl of Castlemaine.

2 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

To all the Royalists that suffered for His Majesty, and to the rest of the good people of England. The humble apology of the English Catholicks.
[London : s.n., 1666]

4to., 14 p.; dated at end: November 16. 1666. Quire B printed in red and black. Anonymous, by Roger Palmer, Earl of Castlemaine, 1634-1705

Wing (2nd ed.), C 1249

Reprinted in London, with a reply 'in behalf of the Royalists' by William Lloyd, in 1667, 1673, 1675. Palmer's reply to Lloyd, with observations on other commentators, appeared in 1668 and 1674, the place of printing undetermined but believed to be Antwerp [Wing (2nd.) 1246, 1240.]

cum salis grano   Link to this

"....But how can we say that the English Reformation was
of such importance ? After all, the revolt against unity,
the effort to destroy Christendom, did not begin in
England ; it began (as might have been expected) in the
Germanics, and in the non-Romanised part of the Ger-
manics. Nor was England the battle-field of the Refor-
mation. The battle-field of the Reformation was
France. A whole lifetime of fighting in France decided
for the rest of Europe that compromise on which Europe
afterwards attempted most insecurely to live. The
French religious wars did not establish Protestantism, on
the contrary they saved the Catholic culture ; but they
went on so long and were so indecisive that they
allowed the new religion to take root.

Again, no Englishman or group of Englishmen
appeared as leaders of the reaction against Catholic
morals, Catholic doctrine and the old European unity.
Everything at the beginning of the English movement
came late, everything was accidental. How, then, can
we regard the English movement as being of such
supreme importance ? ..."
http://www.archive.org/stream/MN5014ucmf_0/MN50...

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References

  • 1666
    • Dec
  • 1667