8 Annotations

Alan Bedford   Link to this

Algernon Percy (1602-1668) was the last of the male line of the Percy family, who had come to England with William the Conquerer. He had been appointed Governor of the Fleet and subsequently Lord High Admiral under Charles I, but was dismissed at the beginning of the Civil War for refusing to support the Royalists.

Matthew   Link to this

According to the 1911 encyclopedia he made unsuccessful attempts to reform the navy, so in a sense Pepys continued his work. There's a picture of him at:
http://www.npg.org.uk/live/search/portrait.asp?...

Paul Brewster   Link to this

His father was an interesting fellow.
"Born 1564, the 9th Earl was two years older than James VI. He owned massive estates in northern England as well as the south. His main establishment was Pentworth in Sussex. Although his speech was inclined to be slow and he was slightly deaf he was a highly gifted man. His scientific experiments and library earned him the title of

Paul L James   Link to this

Please note the Percy's estate in Sussex is PETWORTH

Mick Essex   Link to this

Algernon Percy wasn't the last male in the Percy line strictly speaking. He had a surviving son, Joscelin Percy, who succeeded as 10th earl of Northumberland age 16 on his fathers death in 1668 unfortunately the young man died of a fever in Turin, presumably while on the "Grand Tour" on 21/31 May 1670.

Bill   Link to this

Algernon Percy, Earl of Northumberland, held the office of Lord High Admiral from March, 1637, to June, 1642.
---Wheatley, 1896.

Bill   Link to this

Algernon, earl of Northumberland, was, for his knowledge and prudence in naval affairs, in 1637, advanced to the dignity of lord high-admiral: he having the year before, with a fleet of sixty sail, taken and sunk all the Dutch fishing busses employed upon the British coasts. He was lofty in his carriage, and as elevated in his sentiments of liberty. Thinking that the condition of a nobleman under a despotic government, was only a more splendid slavery, he sided with the patriotic junto, with a view of curbing the power of the king; and was at length carried by the tide of faction much farther than he intended to go. His commission of lord high-admiral was revoked by his majesty in 1642, and he was succeeded by the earl of Warwick. Ob. 13 Oct. 1668.
---A Biographical History of England. J. Granger, 1779.

Bill   Link to this

PERCY, SIR ALGERNON, tenth Earl OF Northumberland (1601-1668), elder son of Sir Henry Percy, ninth earl of Northumberland; of St. John's College, Cambridge; K.B., 1616; M.P., Sussex, 1624, Chichester, 1625 and 1626; K.G., 1635; admiral of the fleet, 1636; lord high admiral, 1638; became (1639), on the eve of the Scottish war, general of all the forces south of the Trent, but was dissatisfied with Charles I's policy; opposed the solution of the Short parliament, and in the Long parliament gradually drew to the side of the opposition; accepted (1642) a place in the parliamentary committee of safety, and endeavoured to promote a reconciliation with Charles I; appointed (1644) one of the committee of both kingdoms; became guardian of Charles I's two youngest children, 1645; one of the commissioners appointed to negotiate with Charles I at Newport, 1648; subsequently headed the opposition in the House of Lords to Charles I's trial; under the Commonwealth and protectorate remained rigidly aloof from public affairs; privy councillor after the Restoration; called by Clarendon 'the proudest man alive.'
---Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome. S. Lee, 1906.

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References

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