Wednesday 14 April 1669

Up, and with W. Hewer to White Hall, and there I did speak with the Duke of York, the Council sitting in the morning, and it was to direct me to have my business ready of the Administration of the Office against Saturday next, when the King would have a hearing of it. Thence home, W. Hewer with me, and then out with my own coach to the Duke of York’s play-house, and there saw “The Impertinents,” a play which pleases me well still; but it is with great trouble that I now see a play, because of my eyes, the light of the candles making it very troublesome to me. After the play my wife and I towards the Park, but it being too late we to Creed’s, and there find him and her [his wife] together alone, in their new house, where I never was before, they lodging before at the next door, and a pretty house it is; but I do not see that they intend to keep any coach. Here they treat us like strangers, quite according to the fashion — nothing to drink or eat, which is a thing that will spoil our ever having any acquaintance with them; for we do continue the old freedom and kindness of England to all our friends. But they do here talk mightily of my Lady Paulina making a very good end, and being mighty religious in her lifetime; and hath left many good notes of sermons and religion; wrote with her own hand, hand, which nobody ever knew of; which I am glad of: but she was always a peevish lady. Thence home, and there to talk and to supper and to bed, all being very safe as to my seeing of poor Deb. yesterday.

6 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

14th April, 1669. I dined with the Archbishop of Canterbury
[ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/2519/ ], at Lambeth, and saw the library, which was not very considerable.

http://goo.gl/rjHJo

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"they do here talk mightily of my Lady Paulina making a very good end, and being mighty religious in her lifetime;"

L&M note Lady Paulina Mountagu, Sandwich's unmarried daughter,had died on 28 February.

Ramona   Link to this

"Here they (Creed and his wife) treat us like strangers..."
Fie on them. It is one of the things I have loved best about Mr. Pepys, his generous nature,
always paying his share and more, for example during the past year bringing his office staff home for mid day dinner. You sense Mr. Pepys will always continue "the old freedom and kindness of Old England to all his friends."

nix   Link to this

Whatever became of Monsieur L'Impertinent?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Whatever became of Monsieur L’Impertinent?"

Nix, alas, we've nor seen hide nor hair nor heard of him since 3 December 1660 when Pepys reported "Mons. L’Impertinent...is to go to Ireland to-morrow, and so came to take his leave of me." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/12/03/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...all being very safe as to my seeing of poor Deb. yesterday."

Last time you thought that Sam...Disaster loomed.

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