Tuesday 26 January 1668/69

Up, and to the office, where busy sitting all the morning. Then to the Office again, and then to White Hall, leaving my wife at Unthanke’s; and I to the Secretary’s chamber, where I was, by particular order, this day summoned to attend, as I find Sir D. Gawden also was. And here was the King and the Cabinet met; and, being called in, among the rest I find my Lord Privy Seale, whom I never before knew to be in so much play, as to be of the Cabinet. The business is, that the Algerines have broke the peace with us, by taking some Spaniards and goods out of an English ship, which had the Duke of York’s pass, of which advice come this day; and the King is resolved to stop Sir Thomas Allen’s fleete from coming home till he hath amends made him for this affront, and therefore sent for us to advise about victuals to be sent to that fleete, and some more ships; wherein I answered them to what they demanded of me, which was but some few mean things; but I see that on all these occasions they seem to rely most upon me. And so, this being done, I took coach and took up my wife and straight home, and there late at the office busy, and then home, and there I find W. Batelier hath also sent the books which I made him bring me out of France. Among others, L’Estat, de France, Marnix, &c., to my great content; and so I was well pleased with them, and shall take a time to look them over: as also one or two printed musick-books of songs; but my eyes are now too much out of tune to look upon them with any pleasure, therefore to supper and to bed.

3 Annotations

Art Perry   Link to this

"as also one or two printed musick-books of songs; but my eyes are now too much out of tune to look upon them with any pleasure"

Here we have a bit of the poet in Pepys. I love the turn of phrase!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Turn of phrase

SP remarks on how much Lord Robartes "[is] in play" -- much-used phase, that.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"and therefore sent for us to advise about victuals to be sent to that fleete, and some more ships"

L&M note the Algerines, claiming the 1664 treaty did not cover foreigners or foreign goods on English ships, had taken "60 Spaniards, many friars and a person of quality" from the Williams of London, and demanded a ransom of 100,000 pieces of eight. Two ships were immediately fitted out for dispatch to the Straits and Allin was able to impose another treaty on the Algerines (February (1670) .

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