Tuesday 20 October 1668

Up, and to the office all the morning, and then home to dinner, having this day a new girl come to us in the room of Nell, who is lately, about four days since, gone away, being grown lazy and proud. This girl to stay only till we have a boy, which I intend to keep when I have a coach, which I am now about. At this time my wife and I mighty busy laying out money in dressing up our best chamber, and thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed’s being now married to Mrs. Pickering; a thing I could never have expected, but it is done about seven or ten days since, as I hear out of the country. At noon home to dinner, and my wife and Harman and girl abroad to buy things, and I walked out to several places to pay debts, and among other things to look out for a coach, and saw many; and did light on one for which I bid 50l., which do please me mightily, and I believe I shall have it. So to my tailor’s, and the New Exchange, and so by coach home, and there, having this day bought “The Queene of Arragon” play, I did get my wife and W. Batelier to read it over this night by 11 o’clock, and so to bed.

7 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Keeping up with the Creeds.

"thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed's being now married to Mrs. Pickering; a thing I could never have expected"

This possibility has nettled Pepys for awhile. 24 April 1665: Lady Sandwich told Pepys privily of Creed's designs on Betty Pickering, and registered her own coolness to the idea, but, Pepys judged "not so severe as it ought to have been ," and there are more details here: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/04/24/

And this 29 July: "Mr. Swan, my old acquaintance...tells me, for a certainty, that Creed is to marry Betty Pickering, and that the thing is concluded, which I wonder at, and am vexed for." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/07/29/

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Lord Andover
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 20 October 1668

Will. Sydenham tells the writer that his Lordship, when last in town, was pleased to inquire where the Duke was. He can answer that, setting duty apart, he was where he cannot have so much pleasure, as he should have in his Lordship's conversation. His days of hunting are wearing out apace, & those of talking (said to be the old man's exercise) grow on as fast. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

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So true, so true.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"At this time my wife and I mighty busy laying out money in dressing up our best chamber, and thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed’s being now married to Mrs. Pickering;"

More evidence (if needed) of Sam's competitive streak. Sir William Penn put him on his professional mettle, now Creed challenges his social standing.

Claire   Link to this

In an odd kluge of old and new that is only possible in the era of the internet, I am excited that Pepys is getting a coach and decorating his "best chamber," and I am wishing he could post photos.

Larry Hill   Link to this

Shows how little things have changed over the centuries. We still value material possessions a little too much and we are always in a rush to keep up with the neighbours next door!!

Ian Greenwood   Link to this

'...having this day bought “The Queene of Arragon” play, I did get my wife and W. Batelier to read it over this night by 11 o’clock, and so to bed.'

Home play-readings, with the three taking all the parts? Did he often do this?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hmmn...Pickering. Now Sir Gilbert Pickering was the one in trouble at Restoration, having been a judge at the trial of Charles I, saved because he didn't sign Charles I's death warrant and Montagu was his brother-in-law. This unusually socially mobile marriage has a certain smell of possible blackmail...Though perhaps Creed honestly won points by offering his services to the Pickerings and claiming to still remain somewhat true to the Cromwellian cause in secret?

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