Friday 20 September 1667

At the office doing business all the morning. At noon expected Creed to have come to dine with me and brought Mr. Sheres (the gentleman lately come from my Lord Sandwich) with him; but they come not, so there was a good dinner lost. After dinner my wife and Jane about some business of hers abroad, and then I to the office, where, having done my business, I out to pay some debts: among others to the taverne at the end of Billiter Lane, where my design was to see the pretty mistress of the house, which I did, and indeed is, as I always thought, one of the modestest, prettiest, plain women that ever I saw. Thence was met in the street by Sir W. Pen, and he and I by coach to the King’s playhouse, and there saw “The Mad Couple,” which I do not remember that I have seen; it is a pretty pleasant play. Thence home, and my wife and I to walk in the garden, she having been at the same play with Jane, in the 18d. seat, to shew Jane the play, and so home to supper and to bed.

4 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to Orrery
Written from: Kilkenny
Date: 20 September 1667

... What his Lordship writes in his letter of 12th inst. is a better subject for discourse, than for correspondence, "which cannot comprehend all that may be said, lamented, & apprehended". As yet, the writer finds no cause to disown his friendship for Lord Clarendon. There may have been reason to take the Great Seal from him. ... But none has yet appeared. ... When the reasons shall be known, as doubtless one time or other, they must be, the writer hopes to be on the other side; and that they may be found to be rather reasons of supposed conveniency to the State, than of guilt in the late Chancellor. ...

... Notices also some matters which may possibly be made cause of complaint against the writer's Government of Ireland. ... But, as yet, he himself knows of no reason to wish anything that he has done therein, undone. ... They are his best friends who will inform him of errors - a preparedness which, apart from ill fear of accusation, befits men of place.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Thence was met in the street by Sir W. Pen, and he and I by coach to the King’s playhouse, and there saw “The Mad Couple,”... Thence home, and my wife and I to walk in the garden, she having been at the same play with Jane, in the 18d. seat, to shew Jane the play."

Stuart comedy of manners...The question being which Pepys was honest enough to admit to solo playgoing first.

Hmmn...So obviously Bess has a supply of spending money.

While it's certainly true Sam has given his all for King and Navy and Country these past few years, it's interesting to see him sauntering off to the playhouse with Penn like this. No afternoons spent wearing out six clerks drawing dramatic plans to utterly revamp the Navy?

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...she having been at the same play with Jane, in the 18d. seat, to shew Jane the play,..." doth remember 9d would get one into the flickers, and 1/9d would get a place into the upper bat house after the curtain went up in the Drury Lane, now the price be sky high that I can no longer afford..

cum salis grano   Link to this

"...and there saw “The Mad Couple,” which I do not remember that I have seen;..."
Samuel you be right, seen before published, 5 years available to get it corrected and updated to suit the Royal house.

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