Thursday 25 July 1667

Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning. At noon home to dinner, and there sang with much pleasure with my wife, and so to the office again, and busy all the afternoon. At night Sir W. Batten, [Sir] W. Pen, and myself, and Sir R. Ford, did meet in the garden to discourse about our prizes at Hull. It appears that Hogg is the veriest rogue, the most observable embezzler, that ever was known. This vexes us, and made us very free and plain with Sir W. Pen, who hath been his great patron, and as very a rogue as he. But he do now seem to own that his opinion is changed of him, and that he will joyne with us in our strictest inquiries, and did sign to the letters we had drawn, which he had refused before, and so seemingly parted good friends, and then I demanded of Sir R. Ford and the rest, what passed to-day at the meeting of the Parliament: who told me that, contrary to all expectation by the King that there would be but a thin meeting, there met above 300 this first day, and all the discontented party; and, indeed, the whole House seems to be no other almost. The Speaker told them, as soon as they were sat, that he was ordered by the King to let them know he was hindered by some important business to come to them and speak to them, as he intended; and, therefore, ordered him to move that they would adjourn themselves till Monday next, it being very plain to all the House that he expects to hear by that time of the sealing of the peace, which by letters, it seems, from my Lord Holis, was to be sealed the last Sunday.1 But before they would come to the question whether they would adjourn, Sir Thomas Tomkins steps up and tells them, that all the country is grieved at this new raised standing army; and that they thought themselves safe enough in their trayn-bands; and that, therefore, he desired the King might be moved to disband them. Then rises Garraway and seconds him, only with this explanation, which he said he believed the other meant; that, as soon as peace should be concluded, they might be disbanded. Then rose Sir W. Coventry, and told them that he did approve of what the last gentleman said; but also, that at the same time he did no more than what, he durst be bold to say, he knew to be the King’s mind, that as soon as peace was concluded he would do it of himself. Then rose Sir Thomas Littleton, and did give several reasons for the uncertainty of their meeting again but to adjourne, in case news comes of the peace being ended before Monday next, and the possibility of the King’s having some about him that may endeavour to alter his own, and the good part of his Council’s advice, for the keeping up of the land-army; and, therefore, it was fit that they did present it to the King as their desire, that, as soon as peace was concluded, the land-army might be laid down, and that this their request might be carried to the King by them of their House that were Privy-councillors; which was put to the vote, and carried ‘nemine contradicente’. So after this vote passed, they adjourned: but it is plain what the effects of this Parliament will be, if they be suffered to sit, that they will fall foul upon the faults of the Government; and I pray God they may be permitted to do it, for nothing else, I fear, will save the King and kingdom than the doing it betimes. They gone, I to walk with my wife in the garden, and then home to supper and to bed.

  1. The peace was signed on the 31st. See August 9th.—B.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

Iuly. 25. 1667. mr Ball prsented a book Historicall applications & occasional meditations on seuerall subiects).

mr. Hooke brough in mr Townlys instrument for measuring Diameters to very minute parts. consisting of a Screw with Indexes &c he Reported that Dr. Croon has a description and scheme of the Instrument from mr Townly himself, which was orderd to be brough in and enterd in the Register. as also that the operator make one of the same kind to be kept in the Repository.

mr. Hooke produced also the Instrument of his own invention being of more plain and easy vse it consisting of 2 threads and a Ruler whereby an inch is Diagonally diuided into 5000 parts and may wth. the same ease be diuided into 40000 or more at pleasure wherevnto is to be fitted part of a tube whose Circle is Diuided into 360 degrees and a thread passing through the Diameter, which will serue to find the true position of any starr. Orderd that mr. Hooke doe bring in an account of his Instrument in writing wth. a Scheme of it to be entred in the Register book, and that one of the instruments be likewise made to be kept in the Repository.

mr Hook mentiond that he had another invention of an Instrumt to measure Diameters with great exactness which he promised to giue an account of at the next meeting.

Report being made that the great box fitted to the exhausting engine had not succeeded according to Expectation the air as mr Hook supposed getting in at the brasse sucker, he told the company that he had since fitted it wth. a wooder sucker instead of that which would be ready against the next meeting (Dr. Wilkins said wood would not hold condensd air) Dr. King would couer it wth searcloth
[ http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cerecloth ]) mr Hooke replyed he thought he had stopped all the passages ^ /of air/ wth cement so that it would now perform well, and if this should fair he thought there was noe better way than to couer it wth Lead (Blunt thought that holland searcloth was better than Leather which if well sised with glue. searcloth &c will shrink & brake. mr Henshaw inquired whether it were air or vapours that entred vpon exhausting the box? to wch. mr Hook answerd that those times he sat in the box he found noe other difference but what there was a little extraordinary heate. mr Hooke moued that seeing the cement of the engine was subject to crack in the carriage from Gresham College to Arundell house wherby it became defectiue, he moued that a comtee might be appointed to see some Expts. made wth it at his Lodgings in Gresham Colledge & to Report the same to the Society.

(Dr. Kings account of Anatom expts. 7 in all orderd to be registred) Blunt about feeding fish) stone in carps head a tooth.)

mr. Ball of Loadstone) Dr. wilk tht Dr. Cotton has found a Rock of Loadstone and can furnish one of any bignesse) mr Henshaw mr Neile & mr Hooke were desired to joyne wth mr Ball in making a catalogue of magneticall things necessary to be procured - mr. Hooke moued to haue a Description of the place where the Loadstones were found to know how the poles doe lye in the earth, whether parallel to the axis or after the manner of the dipping needle or parallel to any meridian which may be known by taking the position of any one stone there. mr. Ball said the place is 12 miles behither Plimmouth in the Road neer Darthmouth in a very high hill of neer a mile ascent the water standing there is like that of Rusty Iron. Dr. Wilkins that the florentine stone had Lost of its vertue by a wrong position) mr Hook is of opinion that those mines & metalls were at first thrown vp by Earthquaks
http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...
65
though there are metalline. waters that Crystallize as is seen in the various figures of antimony and other metalls but that Gold is made by an extraordinary subterraneous heat because it is always found in metall not in Oar. against which it was answered that there is gold to be found in all metalls

(mr. Ball a hair ball out of an oxes stomack deliuerd to mr Hooke). Dr. King suceed not againe in opening thorax of Dogg. mr. Hook & mr Ball were earnestly desired to obserue the conuexity of the Canall in the Park and not to faile to giue an account next meeting. mr Neile to procure Leaue from Ld Generall.

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Arlington to Sandwich
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 25 July 1667
Document type: Original; chiefly in cypher. Subscribed & signed.

After long expectancy, has received Lord Sandwich's letter of June 26/ July 6. Has told Mrs Godolphin that such overtures as the Duke of Medina las Torres made to him, and such only, are capable of making us enter into a League offensive & defensive with Spain. The ill condition of our affairs at home, and the ill reputation of theirs abroad, will cetainly make us to go steady. Enters, at length, into the expectations entertained "in these parts of the world" that Spain will accomodate with France.

Signifies the King's entire satisfaction with his Lordship's good conduct of the business entrusted to him. Adds some particulars of the proceedings of the Dutch Fleet under de Ruyter, at Dartmouth, & in the Thames.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"nemine contradicente"

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nemine_contradicente

US Senate form: "without objection."

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"the eeriest rogue"
Probably should be "the veriest rogue." We had this mis-scan once before.

Ruben   Link to this

“the eeriest rogue”
In my dictionary (Babylon) eerie is "frightening, weird, mysterious".
I was happy with this translation because of the context. Now, I don't know.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"It appears that Hogg is the eeriest rogue, the most observable embezzler, that ever was known. This vexes us..."

Sounds like there's no honor among thieves. Not to mention "most observable embezzler" suggests he's not very good at it.

"Eeriest rogue..." lets hope it's not a misscan; it's too much fun.

"It's those tentacles that bother me most." Batten notes. "And after all, unlike that Jones fellow we don't have his heart in a box."

"I don't care." Sam shakes head. "I still refuse to go with that Sparrow maniac. Do you know the man made a pass at my Bess that day I interviewed him?"

Turnabout, fair play...Sir Richard thinks.

Ruben   Link to this

Thank you, Robert.
Now I understand that Samuel had an encounter with an ancestor of the Pink Panther!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"It appears that Hogg is the veriest rogue"

So read L&M and it makes sense in the passage, vindicating Paul Chapin's memory.

(Fun with Ruben and Robert.... )

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M also mote that Tomkins' speech "that all the country is grieved at this new raised standing army; and that they thought themselves safe enough in their trayn-bands" became famous and was ensured so by Marvell's "Last Instructions to a Painter" (London, 4 September 1667 ):

But fresh as from the Mint, the courtiers fine
Salute them, smiling at their vain design,
And Turner gay up to his perch does march
With face new bleached, smoothened and stiff with starch;
Tells them he at Whitehall had took a turn
And for three days thence moves them to adjourn.
`Not so!' quoth Tomkins, and straight drew his tongue,
Trusty as steel that always ready hung,
And so, proceeding in his motion warm,
The army soon raised, he doth as soon disarm.
True Trojan! While this town can girls afford,
And long as cider lasts in Herford,
The girls shall always kiss thee, though grown old,
And in eternal healths thy name be trolled.

http://www.theotherpages.org/poems/marvel04.html

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Can Parliament act for good or ill?

L&M note Parliament had been prorogued by the King on 8 February to 10 October, ergo there is some doubt whether it can properly be reconvened -- and act -- before that date.

cum salis grano   Link to this

"Can Parliament act for good or ill?"
depends on the receiver of the benefits or he whom has to "coughs up "?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Sir Thomas Tomkins steps up and tells them, that all the country is grieved at this new raised standing army; and that they thought themselves safe enough in their trayn-bands; and that, therefore, he desired the King might be moved to disband them. Then rises Garraway and seconds him, only with this explanation, which he said he believed the other meant; that, as soon as peace should be concluded, they might be disbanded. Then rose Sir W. Coventry, and told them that he did approve of what the last gentleman said; but also, that at the same time he did no more than what, he durst be bold to say, he knew to be the King’s mind, that as soon as peace was concluded he would do it of himself."

Interesting...The national sentiment at least as expressed in Parliament seems (rightly) still more afraid of absolutism backed by troops than foreign invasion. Less fear of Louis and DeWitt than an armed Charles. I wonder where Coventry comes down on this...We know he favors a technically efficient benevolent despotism, but would even he be hesitant to back a permanent standing army?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... and, therefore, it was fit that they did present it to the King as their desire, that, as soon as peace was concluded, the land-army might be laid down, and that this their request might be carried to the King by them of their House that were Privy-councillors; which was put to the vote, and carried ‘nemine contradicente’. "

This period, of the then recent past, might be one reason for the concerns about a standing army

".The Rule of the Major-Generals was a 15-month period of direct military government during Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate. The failure of the First Protectorate Parliament discouraged Cromwell from further attempts to co-operate with civilian politicians, and a series of Royalist conspiracies that culminated in Penruddock's Uprising in the spring of 1655 convinced him that stringent security measures should be enforced. Cromwell also believed that the failure of the Western Design to the West Indies was a sign of God's displeasure at England's progress, and that a godly reform of the nation's morals was urgently required. ... In the summer of 1656, under the urgent need to raise further funds to maintain the system, the Major-Generals collectively attempted to influence the elections for the Second Protectorate Parliament. ...While the Major-Generals were successful in law enforcement and in curbing security threats to the Protectorate their attempts at reforming the nation's morals varied from region to region according to the zeal of individual officers, but had no lasting effects. However, the brief period of the Rule of the Major-Generals has cast a long shadow in English history. Military government in combination with forced moral reform has come to symbolise the worst excesses of Puritan repression. The Major-Generals are traditionally represented as tyrannical despots ruling over their regions with an iron fist, though historians in recent times have tended to moderate this view.
http://www.british-civil-wars.co.uk/glossary/ru...

Spoiler.
In 1688 this was one of the criticisms of James II and concerns of the 'Bill of Rights'

"That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of Parliament, is against law;"

and from the UK "Statute Law Database" the prohibition still is in force: http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk/content.aspx?activ...

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Once again, as per Paul's annotation above, I've now corrected "eeriest" to "veriest" in the text.

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