Tuesday 5 March 1666/67

Up, and to the office, where met and sat all the morning, doing little for want of money, but only bear the countenance of an office. At noon home to dinner, and then to the office again, and there comes Martin my purser, and I walked with him awhile in the garden, I giving him good advice to beware of coming any more with high demands for supernumeraries or other things, for now Sir W. Pen is come to mind the business, the passing of his accounts will not be so easy as the last. He tells me he will never need it again, it being as easy, and to as much purpose to do the same thing otherwise, and how he do keep his Captain’s table, and by that means hath the command of his Captains, and do not fear in a 5th- rate ship constantly employed to get a 1000l. in five years time, and this year, besides all his spendings, which are I fear high, he hath got at this day clear above 150l. in a voyage of about five or six months, which is a brave trade. He gone I to the office, and there all the afternoon late doing much business, and then to see Sir W. Batten, whose leg is all but better than it was, and like to do well. I by discourse do perceive he and his Lady are to their hearts out with my Lord Bruncker and Mrs. Williams, to which I added something, but, I think, did not venture too far with them. But, Lord! to see to what a poor content any acquaintance among these people, or the people of the world, as they now-adays go, is worth; for my part I and my wife will keep to one another and let the world go hang, for there is nothing but falseness in it. So home to supper and hear my wife and girle sing a little, and then to bed with much content of mind.

11 Annotations

Michael L   Link to this

"for my part I and my wife will keep to one another and let the world go hang, for there is nothing but falseness in it."

And this melodramatic statement is from the guy with concealed trysts and off-the-books schemes for gaining silver accessories?

Why is it that the people most vocal in bemoaning others' behaviors are too often the same people who would do that behavior themselves.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...I giving him good advice to beware of coming any more with high demands for supernumeraries or other things, for now Sir W. Pen is come to mind the business, the passing of his accounts will not be so easy as the last."

Falseness, eh?

Still, nice to see the Pepysian second honeymoon continues despite the rendezvous with Bagwell.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

I had not realised that Betty Lane's husband has also been found a job by Sam which keeps him out of the country for long periods - just like Mr Bagwell.
What a neat arrangement! The husbands get the chance to make some money, Sam gets the chance to make the wives. A win-win situation.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"for my part I and my wife will keep to one another and let the world go hang..."
Then they will start singing:"Baby, it is you and me against the world...."

language hat   Link to this

Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Bess, it's just you and me...And Bagwell, Mercer, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Knipp, Diana Crisp, Doll Lane, Mrs. Burroughs, Gervais' assistant Jane (oops, no, she turned me down), little Mrs. Tooker (hmmn, perhaps best not to include her and her clap), a flighty girl I met once or twice, doubtless others whose names I can't remember, and if, there is a God who loves his Samuel, one day, Betty Mitchell."

andy   Link to this

for my part I and my wife will keep to one another and let the world go hang

with you there,Sam.

cum salis grano   Link to this

Samuell's chest full of medallions or scalps.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

It is easy: my sins are not as bad as the next man's.

Ruben   Link to this

Ah, love, let us be true to one another!

Thank you for Arnold's lines. I enjoyed the moment. Considering Samuel's diary, they are forgiving words. Certainly a Victorian poet is far from a Restauration mentality. But the contrast helps to comprehend the gap between them, that I presume was greater than the one between Samuel and our time.

Bradford   Link to this

Yet the lines are as sadly appropriate to Pepys's time---he who never could have known them---as to Arnold's, as to ours.

Just as "let the world go hang, for there is nothing but falseness in it" pre-echoes, a little, a teenager from half a century ago named Holden.

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