Saturday 14 April 1666

[Continued from yesterday. P.G.] Up about seven and finished our papers, he and I, and I delivered him tallys and some money and so away I to the office, where we sat all the morning. At noon dined at home and Creed with me, then parted, and I to the office, and anon called thence by Sir H. Cholmley and he and I to my chamber, and there settled our matters of accounts, and did give him tallys and money to clear him, and so he being gone and all these accounts cleared I shall be even with the King, so as to make a very clear and short account in a very few days, which pleases me very well. Here he and I discoursed a great while about Tangier, and he do convince me, as things are now ordered by my Lord Bellasses and will be by Norwood (men that do only mind themselves), the garrison will never come to any thing, and he proposes his owne being governor, which in truth I do think will do very well, and that he will bring it to something. He gone I to my office, where to write letters late, and then home and looked over a little more my papers of accounts lately passed, and so to bed.

6 Annotations

cape henry   Link to this

After many days - and long nights - of pounding his head against the accounting rock, it appears Pepys has done the most sensible and expedient thing: cleared out and paid up the intelligible bits - and the ones attaching to the king - in order to get a fresh start. Then something odd happens. Creed is suddenly remade a genius again and will turn the Tangier disaster around. Of course sending Creed to Tangier may be useful in other ways. We'll see.

Terry W   Link to this

"Creed is suddenly remade a genius ... "
CH: I think it's Sir Hugh Cholmley who Samuel thinks will "turn the Tangier disaster around".

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"he proposes his owne being governor"

I wonder who Sir Hugh Cholmley's "owne" might be?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Cholmley is proposing that he himself should be governor.

Mary   Link to this

In 1663 Cholmley was given charge of the building of the mole at Tangier, so he already has prior knowledge of the base there; thus as well-placed as anyone to exercise the role of governor and better than many.

cape henry   Link to this

Well then, permit me to stand corrected, and let's by all means revoke Creed's unearned elevation to genius.What diary was I reading last night???

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