Tuesday 10 April 1666

Up betimes, and many people to me about business. To the office and there sat till noon, and then home and dined, and to the office again all the afternoon, where we sat all, the first time of our resolution to sit both forenoons and afternoons. Much business at night and then home, and though late did see some work done by the plasterer to my new window in the boy’s chamber plastered. Then to supper, and after having my head combed by the little girle to bed. Bad news that the plague is decreased in the general again and two increased in the sickness.

13 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

April
10. To Lond: to visite Sir W: D’Oylie[ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1355/ ], surpriz’d with a fit of Apoplexie & in extreame danger:
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/1914/ed...

Lawrence   Link to this

"Then to supper, and after having my head combed by the little girle to bed"

I thought he donned a wig, so as to make life a little easier, he would have his hair cropped? this seems strange to me? that he'd want someone to comb hair you probably don't have!

Mary   Link to this

Sam hasn't mentioned his wig(s) for a long time. No discussion of them being sent to the wig-maker's for 'dressing' as was alluded to in the past. Perhaps he quietly abandoned them pro. tem. during the plague year?

Mary   Link to this

"...... and two increased in the sicknesse."

L&M note that burials from all causes had decreased by 16 from the previous week, but that plague burials had increased from 26 to 28. Presumably this is what Pepys means.

Mark Peaty [aka Xodarap]   Link to this

Mary: "Sam hasn’t mentioned his wig(s) for a long time. No discussion of them being sent to the wig-maker’s for ‘dressing’ as was alluded to in the past. Perhaps he quietly abandoned them pro. tem. during the plague year?"

An interesting thought Mary, does a wigless head make a smaller target for a flea to land on when the rich and powerful [and the wanna-bes] incline their heads together for quiet discussions and deal making?

It would be nice to think that the more sculduggerous types, whispering only, would have their heads closer together and therefore risking higher mortality than than more "upright" types who were happier to speak louder! :-)

Bryan M   Link to this

"Sam hasn’t mentioned his wig(s) for a long time. No discussion of them being sent to the wig-maker’s for ‘dressing’ as was alluded to in the past. Perhaps he quietly abandoned them pro. tem. during the plague year?"

I don't think we have to look too far for evidence that Sam is still wearing a wig. The oil was still drying on Hale's portrait (below & above).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Samuel_Pepys.jpg

Lawrence   Link to this

I wonder what a dash he cut? with his wig, and he being only 5'1'' tall?

Mary   Link to this

re: the portrait.

We know that Sam borrowed (or hired) the "Indian robe" that he wears in the portrait. Perhaps his donning of a wig was equally temporary?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...the first time of our resolution to sit both forenoons and afternoons."

Well, I guess there is a war on.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Closeness of heads

There was an increase in headlice in upper classes primary schools here about 10 years ago when it was customary for a group to cluster around a computer screen (when a classroom might only have one or two). In Queensland, headlice breed fast and furious.

Re the combing. I think there was been a sudden outbreak of headcombing as Bess is away - working out how much he can get away with before he pounces?

Working as a group in two sessions: as RG said - there's a war on : Keep Calm & Carry On as the poster said.

cgs   Link to this

"...No discussion of them being sent to the wig-maker’s..."
The periwigers [makers and stylists] were with the money, near those that keep fashions in style , most,if not all periwiggers wearers had left town, exception be the Diarist.
Seaman barber be not of use, short back and sides be the only skill.

Mary   Link to this

Seaman barber.

I'm not sure that such a profession existed at this time. Many seamen seem to have worn their hair long, both at this point and much later; not in flowing locks around the face and shoulders, but plaited into a queue.

If you look at Lord Nelson's jacket, as preserved in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, you can observe the dark stain between the shoulder-blades where his greasy queue (plait) marked the cloth.

cgs   Link to this

Thanks, a good point, probably true also for the average male who only earns less than 12 d a day.

Girls had fun on lovers lane swishing for 'luverly' lice

When did the phrase come into fashion "cleanliness be next to..."

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