Wednesday 19 April 1665

Up by five o’clock, and by water to White Hall; and there took coach, and with Mr. Moore to Chelsy; where, after all my fears what doubts and difficulties my Lord Privy Seale would make at my Tangier Privy Seale, he did pass it at first reading, without my speaking with him. And then called me in, and was very civil to me. I passed my time in contemplating (before I was called in) the picture of my Lord’s son’s lady, a most beautiful woman, and most like to Mrs. Butler. Thence very much joyed to London back again, and found out Mr. Povy; told him this; and then went and left my Privy Seale at my Lord Treasurer’s; and so to the ‘Change, and thence to Trinity-House; where a great dinner of Captain Crisp, who is made an Elder Brother. And so, being very pleasant at dinner, away home, Creed with me; and there met Povy; and we to Gresham College, where we saw some experiments upon a hen, a dogg, and a cat, of the Florence poyson.1 The first it made for a time drunk, but it come to itself again quickly; the second it made vomitt mightily, but no other hurt. The third I did not stay to see the effect of it, being taken out by Povy. He and I walked below together, he giving me most exceeding discouragements in the getting of money (whether by design or no I know not, for I am now come to think him a most cunning fellow in most things he do, but his accounts), and made it plain to me that money will be hard to get, and that it is to be feared Backewell hath a design in it to get the thing forced upon himself. This put me into a cruel melancholy to think I may lose what I have had so near my hand; but yet something may be hoped for which to-morrow will shew. He gone, Creed and I together a great while consulting what to do in this case, and after all I left him to do what he thought fit in his discourse to-morrow with my Lord Ashly. So home, and in my way met with Mr. Warren, from whom my hopes I fear will fail of what I hoped for, by my getting him a protection. But all these troubles will if not be over, yet we shall see the worst of there in a day or two. So to my office, and thence to supper, and my head akeing, betimes, that is by 10 or 11 o’clock, to bed.

  1. “Sir Robert Moray presented the Society from the King with a phial of Florentine poison sent for by his Majesty from Florence, on purpose to have those experiments related of the efficacy thereof, tried by the Society.” The poison had little effect upon the kitten (Birch’s “History;” vol. ii., p. 31).

17 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"He gone, Creed and I together a great while consulting what to do in this case, and after all I left him to do what he thought fit in his discourse to-morrow with my Lord Ashly."

Hmmn...Clearly Creed is not going to all this trouble out of sheer brotherly love for his ole pal.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

At Gresham College today from the Hooke Folio Online

Apr. 19. Florentine poyson) monr Auzouts Ephem: of 2d Comet) Dr Croon pesented from Sr A King a scheme of first comet, by a Iesuit at madrid, which was deliuerd to mr Hook to compare wth the other obseruations. who was also to take a coppy of Dr wrens [In margin]q: Scheme concerning this Comet, and return the originall to the said Dr. (Sr. P Neile. gum from Guinny like Copall or Anima
(mr. Hoskins produced Indian threed of grasse fit to make Ropes, deliurd to mr Hooke for the Repository. (mr. Cox querys about vegetables

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Is here calendared part of a competition between cousins for Frances Stewart ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Teresa_Ste...

Duke of Richmond http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/7301/ to Ormond http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1221/

Written from: London

Date: 19 April 1665
....

"This last unhappy action", that the writer "was engaged in, is abundantly punished, by his fear" of the misfortune of losing the King's favour; but now he is actually fallen thereunder ... In his affliction, he asks the Duke of Ormond's mediation with his Majesty ...

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Pedro   Link to this

English Intelligence (2)

Today’s entry for the 19th in the Journal of Edward Montagu edited by Anderson (normally posted by Jeannine)…

“His Royal Highness and Prince Rupert, the Duke of Monmouth and the Duke of Buckingham dined on board the Prince with me. I saw a list of the Dutch Fleet…”

He goes on to list the Captains, ships, guns and men in detail.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... that money will be hard to get, and that it is to be feared Backewell hath a design in it to get the thing forced upon himself."

i.e that Blackwell, perhaps in concert with the other City bankers/goldsmiths, is restricting credit so that the Crown will be forced to agree to his terms for providing ready money. At the time there was a statutory limit on interest, I think 6% at the time; however, the Crown from time to time when under duress did make private agreements to pay substantial 'premiums' above the limit.

language hat   Link to this

"The poison had little effect upon the kitten"

I'm relieved to hear it!

dirk   Link to this

John Evelyn's diary today

"Invited to the greate dinner at the Trinity House in Lond[on], where I had businesse with the Commiss[ione]rs of the Navy, and to receive the second L5,000 imprest for his Majesties service of the sick and wounded prisoners. &c. Thence to our Society where were divers poisons experimented on Animals."

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... the picture of my Lord’s son’s lady, ..."

L&M note that the portrait has not been traced.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... the Florence poyson ..."

L&M: "A decoction of tobacco. There was at this time some controversy about whether tobacco produced paralysis: Birch, ii 9, 41."

Bradford   Link to this

Oh, "it made vomitt mightily, but no other hurt." Just remind Sam of that, L. Hat, the next time he pukes up his insides.

"But all these troubles will if not be over, yet we shall see the worst of there in a day or two."

"there" = "these"? Or, better, "them"? Can someone with L&M check?
Most of us have often found ourselves of the same mind: whether disappointed or overjoyed, at least the Wait will be Over one Way or the Other.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M do have “But all these troubles will, if not be over, yet we shall see the worst of them in a day or two.”

Sharp eyes, Bradford.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"This put me in a cruel melancholy"
No need to be so dramatic! You win some,you lose some!

CGS   Link to this

Melancholy from: [???from Dictionary of SP's times?]
The English dictionary or, an interpreter of English words, Enabling as well Ladies and Gentlewomen, young Scholars, Clerkes, Merchants as also s[f]trangers of any Nation,to understanding of the more dificult Authours already printed in our Language, and the more speedie attaining of an elegant perfection of the English tongue,both in reading,s[f]peaking,and writing.
http://www.shipbrook.com/jeff/bookshelf/details...

Melancholy the grossest of the four humours,which bound too much, causes heavinesse and sadnesse of minde

OED:
melancholy, n.1 [v. to melancholy, also adverb]
Anglo-Norman malencolie, malancolie, melancolie, melencolie and Middle French melancolie (c1180 in Old French; French mélancolie) ; post-classical Latin melancholia (5th cent.; already in classical Latin as a Greek loanword) ...............

1. Ill-temper, sullenness, brooding, anger. Obs.
Associated in medieval physiology with an excess of black bile in the body. See sense 2.
a1375

..
b. Med. Originally: a pathological condition thought to result from an excess of black bile in the body, characterized in early references by sullenness, ill-temper, brooding, causeless anger, and unsociability, and later by despondency and sadness. Later: severe depression, melancholia. Now arch. and hist.
From the 17th cent. onwards the word was used in its later sense without aetiological implications.
In some quots. it is difficult to tell whether this sense or one of the associated symptoms (see senses 1 and 3a) is intended; cf. quot. 1859 at sense 3a.

3. a. Sadness, dejection, esp. of a pensive nature; gloominess; pensiveness or introspection; an inclination or tendency to this. Also: {dag}perturbation (obs.).
As with sense 1, regarded in medieval physiology as a symptom of an excess of black bile in the body. See sense 2.
In the Elizabethan period, and for some centuries thereafter, the affectation of melancholy was a fashionable mark of intellectual or aesthetic refinement. Cf. sense 3d.
a1393 GOWER Confessio Amant

b. A cause of sadness; an annoyance, anxiety, or vexation. Usu. in pl. Now rare (chiefly U.S.).
a1475

c. A mood, state, or episode of sadness, dejection, or introspection. Formerly freq. in pl.
a1586

d. Tender, sentimental, or reflective sadness; sadness giving rise to or considered as a subject for poetry, sentimental reflection, etc., or as a source of aesthetic pleasure.
?1614

4. Sullenness, anger, or sadness personified.
a1393

5. A short literary composition (usually poetical) of a sad or mournful character. Obs. rare.
159

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"a scheme of first comet, by a Iesuit at madrid, which was deliuerd to mr Hook to compare wth the other obseruations. who was also to take a coppy of Dr wrens"

The emergent scientific community taking advantage of its geographic reach.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...to Trinity-House; where a great dinner of Captain Crisp, who is made an Elder Brother. And so, being very pleasant at dinner, away home, Creed with me; and there met Povy; and we to Gresham College..."

SPOILER: Evelyn also made the journey from Trinity House to Gresham College, but in his own carriage. He and Pepys will soon become better friends.

Michael L   Link to this

Captain Crisp... no doubt a colleague of Captain Crunch?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Gresham College ­ from the Hooke Folio Online

Apr. 19. Florentine poyson) monr Auzouts Ephem: of 2d Comet) Dr Croon pesented from Sr A King a scheme of first comet, by a Iesuit at madrid, which was deliuerd to mr Hook to compare wth the other obseruations. who was also to take a coppy of Dr wrens [In margin]q: Scheme concerning this Comet, and return the originall to the said Dr.

(Sr. P Neile. gum from Guinny like Copall [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copal ] or Anima [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gum_anima ]

(mr. Hoskins produced Indian threed of grasse fit to make Ropes, deliurd to mr Hooke for the Repository. (mr. Cox querys about vegetables

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

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