Sunday 24 August 1662

(Lord’s day). Slept till 7 o’clock, which I have not done a very great while, but it was my weariness last night that caused it. So rose and to my office till church time, writing down my yesterday’s observations, and so to church, where I all alone, and found Will Griffin and Thomas Hewett got into the pew next to our backs, where our maids sit, but when I come, they went out; so forward some people are to outrun themselves. Here we had a lazy, dull sermon. So home to dinner, where my brother Tom came to me, and both before and after dinner he and I walked all alone in the garden, talking about his late journey and his mistress, and for what he tells me it is like to do well. He being gone, I to church again, where Mr. Mills, making a sermon upon confession, he did endeavour to pull down auricular confession, but did set it up by his bad arguments against it, and advising people to come to him to confess their sins when they had any weight upon their consciences, as much as is possible, which did vex me to hear. So home, and after an hour’s being in my office alone, looking over the plates and globes, I walked to my uncle Wight’s, the truth is, in hopes to have seen and been acquainted with the pretty lady that came along with them to dinner the other day to Mr. Rawlinson, but she is gone away. But here I staid supper, and much company there was; among others, Dr. Burnett, Mr. Cole the lawyer, Mr. Rawlinson, and Mr. Sutton, a brother of my aunt’s, that I never saw before. Among other things they tell me that there hath been a disturbance in a church in Friday Street; a great many young people knotting together and crying out “Porridge”1 often and seditiously in the church, and took the Common Prayer Book, they say, away; and, some say, did tear it; but it is a thing which appears to me very ominous. I pray God avert it. After supper home and to bed.

  1. A nickname given by the Dissenters to the Prayer-Book. In Mrs. Behn’s “City Heiress” (1682), Sir Anthony says to Sir Timothy, “You come from Church, too.” Sir Timothy replies, “Ay, needs must when the Devil drives—I go to save my bacon, as they say, once a month, and that too after the Porridge is served up.” Scott quotes, in his notes to “Woodstock,” a pamphlet entitled, “Vindication of the Book of Common Prayer, against the contumelious Slanders of the Fanatic party terming it Porridge.”

20 Annotations

Bradford   Link to this

All told, a dreary Sabbath; but "so forward some people are to outrun themselves."

Australian Susan   Link to this

Although both Griffen and Hewer are Navy Office employees, Sam is not having them near the official Navy Office Officers' pew. Interesting that his mere presence makes them leave!
Sam makes no comment on the form of service he too part in (presumbly BCP), but just comments unfavourably on both the sermons he heard. Interesting that Mr Mills should choose to preach on confession. Private confession as a pre-requisite to taking part in Mass is an important part of Catholic doctrine. Here Mr Mills seems to be working towards the now standard Anglican formula (maybe a bit off-hand) regarding confession: "All can, some should, none must" Sam is distinctly uneasy about the threat of disturbances per se - he does not seem outraged by people destroying Prayer Books, just that this might be a forerunner of more beaviour by the "fanatiques"as he terms them leading to a resurgance of civil disturbance, which he sincerely does not want again. (Thinking of yesterday - Sam obviously feels no need to confess his thoughts about Lady C!)

Australian Susan   Link to this

Re the above: I was referring to private confession here, not the general confession as part of the service. Sorry for any confusion.

A. Hamilton   Link to this

A striking contrast between the entry for Saturday and that of today, Sunday --especially when it seems likely they were both set down on the same day, one in the morning and tother in the evening. We get a good glimpse of what the city folk are seeing, doing and thinking

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

From way down in Essex "God good to me, my heart cheerful in his work, hoping god will make way for my liberty, and many others, my soul trusts in him. sad to see how the shepherds are scattered, the lord be a blessing to me, gods hand it touches me in some of my substance, lord even therein do not contend with me, but bless me I humbly pray thee; some hope given as if there would be indulgence given to ministers for the present until the return of the parliament.

The London Ministers nearly 80. generally declined preaching, the Bishop took care to supply every place, and the like in the country, some of them petitioned this week for liberty as reported."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

You sneak into the backrow of the bosses' private box and then along comes the junior boss, glaring at you.

"Will..."

Hmmn?

"Milord approachth." Nudge...Will turns to see Sam bearing down on the forward pew. A certain cold look in his eye...

"Oh, Lord. His girl told me he was sleepin' in. C'mon, Tom...God knows we'd not want to get his Divinity in a snit."

***

Not long ago it would have been clerk Sam stealthly slipping in...How quickly one acquires dignity when one is up and coming.

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

That be a lot of homilies that be lost as there approx. 100 parishes in London proper. "London Ministers nearly 80. generally declined preaching"

T, Foreman   Link to this

See mine on Mon 15 Aug, "many Presbyterian ministers in town, who, I hear, will give up all."

L&M note: "Fifty ministers in London and Middlesex were expropriated."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/08/15/#c34159

Were there others who in protest failed to preach, but let Lectors take the service?

JWB   Link to this

"contumelious"
Contumacious has made an Anschluss.

T, Foreman   Link to this

"young people knotting together...and took the Common Prayer Book, they say, away; and, some say, did tear it"

L&M note: "The incident Pepys reports occurred at St Matthew's, whose Rector, Henry Hurst, had been ejected under the terms of the act. The reader was taking the service in his place. Pepys's account of this incident is one of the very few which survive....On the whole there were very few such disturbances. A government newspaper suggested that they were the work of a few organised bands, not of the parishioners...."

So here the reader DID take the service, but not out of sympathy.

Alors, Cumgrannissalis, surely many fewer memorable sermons preached for a long while: one thing Presbyterians stressed at that time was a clergy educated in Hebrew and Greek and in Homiletics.

Roy Feldman   Link to this

Mr. Mills's Sermon

Here's my reading of what Sam says about the sermon on auricular confession:

Mr. Mills started out seeming to criticize it (to "pull it down"); but that wasn't his true intention, because he merely "set up bad arguments against it", and soon enough refuted those arguments and ended with a rousing endorsement of auricular confession. In other words, it turned out to be a bait-and-switch. Perhaps it was that aspect of the sermon that irked Sam the most.

Any thoughts?

Stolzi   Link to this

Confession

I couldn't decide whether it were the 'bait-and-switch' aspect which did vex Sam, or the mere idea of invasion of his me-and-God privacy, the latter a sentiment I have heard expressed by some very Protestant relatives of mine.

And Sam might not like to make his thoughts known - still yearning after that 'pretty lady'!

T, Foreman   Link to this

Mr. Mills's sermons” Caution in Sermon , maybe he [Mills] be not wanting to give sermons on the Strand, income dothe dictate.
As noted by the Essex Preacher , he at least had his farm and fresh meat, but the London Clerics relied on the Collection plate for sustenance and the good graces of His Loordship.
“…the Bishop took care to supply every place…”
It appears that 50% of the Clergy did go by Concience, note that Evelyn J. did say that there be troops on the street to stop the Hooligans and other discontents, People have had enough anarcy , would like to get on with making a living, there be prosperity for many especially for those that have the voice. Revolutions only take place when those that believe that should leading and are frustrated by El Supremo. People will moan but it takes a frustrated Baron type to lead a revolution.

Glyn   Link to this

Pepys feels guilty about sleeping in on a Sunday, not getting up until as late as 7 o'clock. Anybody else feel similarly guilty?

I thought Pepys used to like Mr Mill's sermons but he seems to have been critical of the last few. Is that anyone else's opinion also?

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

"Mr Mill's sermons” Caution in Sermon , maybe he [Mills] be not wanting to give sermons on the Strand, income dothe dictate.
As noted by the Essex Preacher , he at least had his farm and fresh meat, but the London Clerics relied on the Collection plate for sustenance and the good graces of His Loordship.
“…the Bishop took care to supply every place…”
It appears that 50% of the Clergy did go by Concience, note that Evelyn J. did say that there be troops on the street to stop the Hooligans and other discontents, People have had enough anarcy , would like to get on with making a living, there be prosperity for many especially for those that have the voice. Revolutions only take place when those that believe that should leading and are frustrated by El Supremo. People will moan but it takes a frustrated Baron type to lead a revolution.

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

"...Interesting that his mere presence makes them leave!...." It be only natural, for there is now a natural barrier between the ranks. None would ever now dare call him to his face "Pepee" or "Sammy boy" or any other name except Mr Pepys.

David A. Smith   Link to this

"Slept till 7 o'clock, which I have not done a very great while”
Every now and then we have comments on Sam’s seeming indolence, with his long lunches, mid-day digressions, and perambulations in pursuit of pulchritude. But set against that his always rising about dawn, and often working until ten o’clock at night, and we get a better picture of 17th century life, where the civil servant is both never off duty and always off duty. Not for Sam the daily commute as a buffer between his lives!

Australian Susan   Link to this

Sam's hours.
Don't forget that this is summer: he tends to sleep in till dawn when it is winter time and makes a point of noting when he gets up "by candle". Here in sub-tropical Australia, nearly everyone gets up early in summer to avoid the heat - it's impossible to exercise in the morning past about 7.30. I'm up at 5.45 every Sunday!

Mr Mills and sermons and confession: Sam does seem to be discontented by Mr Mills's sermon today. Maybe he was hoping for something stimulating on a day when he is perhaps a bit lonely. Also any hint of seeming to be in favour of Catholic-type personal confession would make Sam queasy.(see my previous post)

GrahamT   Link to this

I knew that farmers and other country folk always got "up with the lark" as animals can't tell the time, so need milking, feeding etc. just after dawn. Here, though, we see that town folk also had their working hours ruled by the sun, not the clock, even though church clocks must have been fairly common by this time.

Cumgranissalis   Link to this

Bessie would make yer life miserable if ye be late. "up with the lark" nutin worse than full uddered cow waiting for releif.

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