Saturday 21 July 1660

This morning Mr. Barlow had appointed for me to bring him what form I would have the agreement between him and me to pass, which I did to his lodgings at the Golden Eagle in the new street1 between Fetter Lane and Shoe Lane, where he liked it very well, and I from him went to get Mr. Spong to engross it in duplicates.

To my Lord and spoke to him about the business of the Privy Seal for me to be sworn, though I got nothing by it, but to do Mr. Moore a kindness, which he did give me a good answer to. Went to the Six Clerks’ office to Mr. Spong for the writings, and dined with him at a club at the next door, where we had three voices to sing catches. So to my house to write letters and so to Whitehall about business of my Lord’s concerning his creation,2 and so home and to bed.

  1. Still retains the name New Street.
  2. As Earl of Sandwich.

9 Annotations

Paul Brewster   Link to this

new street between Fetter Lane and Shoe Lane
L&M footnotes: "Now Little and Great New Sts."

Paul Brewster   Link to this

business of the Privy Seal for me to be sworn, though I got nothing by it, but to do Mr. Moore a kindness, which he did give me a good answer to
L&M footnotes: Pepys was to act for Sandwich and Moore was to deputize for Pepys.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Earl of Sandwich" somewhat interesting article in today's New York Times (7-21-2003)about the 11th Earl of Sandwich sandwich shop;at www.NYtimes.com

chip   Link to this

The Times article is interesting. The present Earl, the 11th, is shown with his son, Orlando Montagu, eating of all things, sandwiches. 'Of his illustrious family of naval officers and lawmakers--one Sandwich or another has been in Parliament since the 1660's, he said--the most famous is the 4th Earl. He was first lord of the admiralty and financed....Captain Cook who kindly named the Sandwich islands after him. (Later they became Hawaii).'How differently this article struck me because of this website, to see what happens to the line of Sandwiches. The fourth becomes lord of the admiralty, surely on his great grandfather's name, and the 11th opens a chain of restaurants based on one (or perhaps several) of the 4th's debauched night(s) of gambling.

language hat   Link to this

Here's the URL for the Sandwich story:
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/21/international...

"...That helps explain why the family of the 11th Earl of Sandwich has set up a sandwich-selling business, also called The Earl of Sandwich.

"'Trading on one's family name is not derogatory anymore, at least not in my view,' Lord Sandwich, 60, said in an interview in the House of Lords...

"Of his illustrious family of naval officers and lawmakers — one Sandwich or another has been in Parliament continuously since the 1660's, he said — the most famous is the fourth Earl. He was first lord of the admiralty and financed the expedition of Captain Cook, who kindly named the Sandwich Islands after him. (Later they became Hawaii.) He was also a bon vivant whose eureka moment, legend has it, came during an all-night gambling session, when, rather than waste time by sitting down to dinner, he ate a hunk of meat between two pieces of bread and gambled on.

Since then, Sandwiches have always been inextricably linked with sandwiches. The earl's grandfather, for instance, was known (to his chagrin) as Lord Snack..."

vincent   Link to this

"...to engross it in duplicates..."
I wonder how many copies, and was one deemed the master copy, or did one rely on cross signatures and the sequence therein?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"business of the Privy Seal for me to be sworn, though I got nothing by it"

"In fact." note L&M "Pepys found the work lucrative" and reference http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/08/02/

Dick Wilson   Link to this

To answer Vincent, one common way was to make an "Indenture". Two copies would be written on one piece of parchment, and after the parties agreed they were the same, the two copies would be sliced apart, with a wiggle or two given to the knife making the cut. Subsequently, the two pieces of parchment could be lined up and they would match perfectly. This would be hard to match, in a forgery.

MarkS   Link to this

A catch is a part song, where the overlapping voices reveal a 'secret' phrase, often bawdy. Catches were popular in the late 17th and through the 18th century.

See
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catch_%28music%29

This page has an mp3 example of a modern catch you can listen to: "University of Michigan Men's Glee Club"

Another modern example: "Liverpool Street Station song"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4v88UZEgeI

(I've just posted this message under the annotation for "catch" as well.)

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