Summary

From Wikipedia’s general Hearth Tax page:

In England, hearth tax, also known as hearth money, chimney tax, or chimney money, was a tax imposed by Parliament in 1662, to support the Royal Household of King Charles II. Following the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Parliament calculated that the Royal Household needed an annual income of £1,200,000. The hearth tax was a supplemental tax to make up the shortfall. It was considered easier to establish the number of hearths than the number of heads, hearths forming a more stationary subject for taxation than people. This form of taxation was new to England, but had precedents abroad. It generated considerable debate, but was supported by the economist Sir William Petty. The bill received Royal Assent on 19 May 1662, with the first payment due on 29 September 1662, Michaelmas.

Read more.

2 Annotations

Bill  •  Link

FUMAGE, Hearth Money
---An Universal Etymological English Dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

Bill  •  Link

There are a number of other references in Pepys' diary to this tax using the term "chimney money."

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.

References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1662

1665

1666

1667

  • Apr