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2 Annotations

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/03/12/#c54...
Wednesday 12 March 1662

... This morning we had news from Mr. Coventry, that Sir G. Downing (like a perfidious rogue, though the action is good and of service to the King,1 yet he cannot with any good conscience do it) hath taken Okey, Corbet, and Barkestead at Delfe, in Holland, and sent them home in the Blackmore.

1 (“And hail the treason though we hate the traitor.”) On 21 March 1662 Charles II returned his formal thanks to the States for their assistance in the matter. — B. ↩

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Notes from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delft_Explosion#De...

Country Netherlands Province South Holland

Delft is a city and municipality in the province of South Holland (Zuid-Holland), in the Netherlands. Delft is located between the larger cities of Rotterdam and The Hague. Delft is primarily known for its historic town center with canals; also for the painter Vermeer, Delft Blue pottery (Delftware), the Delft University of Technology, and its association with the Dutch royal family, the House of Orange-Nassau.

From a rural village in the early Middle Ages Delft developed to a city, which in the 13th century (1246) received its charter.

The town's association with the House of Orange started when William the Silent took up residence in 1572. At the time he was the leader of growing national Dutch resistance against Spanish occupation of the country, which struggle is known as the Eighty Years' War. By then Delft was one of the leading cities of Holland and it was equipped with the necessary city walls to serve as a headquarters.

After the Act of Abjuration in 1581 Delft became the de facto capital of the newly- independent Netherlands, as the seat of the Prince of Orange.

When William the Silent was shot dead in 1584 by Balthazar Gerards in the hall of the Prinsenhof, the family's traditional burial place in Breda was still in the hands of the Spanish. Therefore he was buried in the Delft Nieuwe Kerk (New Church), starting a tradition for the House of Orange that has continued to the present day.

The Delft Explosion, also known as the Delft Thunderclap, occurred on 12 October, 1654 when a gunpowder store exploded, destroying much of the city. Over 100 people were killed and thousands wounded.

About 30 tonnes (66,138 pounds) of gunpowder were stored in barrels in a magazine in a former Clarissen convent in the Doelenkwartier district. Cornelis Soetens, the keeper of the magazine, opened the store to check a sample of the powder and a huge explosion followed. Luckily, many citizens were away, visiting a market in Schiedam or a fair in The Hague.

Artist Carel Fabritius was wounded in the explosion and died of his injuries.

Later Egbert van der Poel painted several pictures of Delft showing the devastation.
The Delft Explosion is the principal reason why Delft University of Technology maintains explosion science as a key topic within its research portfolio and graduate skill-set.

The city center retains a large number of monumental buildings, whereas in many streets there are canals of which the borders are connected by typical bridges, making this city a notable tourist destination.

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References

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1660

1662