Map

The overlays that highlight 17th century London features are approximate and derived from Wenceslaus Hollar’s maps:

Open location in Google Maps: 51.983992, 0.213137

6 Annotations

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"King Charles II probably rode through the village on his way to Newmarket and we know that Samuel Pepys visited a house here, although, tantalisingly, we do not know which one."
http://www.recordinguttlesfordhistory.org.uk/newp…

There are many houses Pepys and Elizzabeth may have visited:

"Newport is a small parish about 3 m. S.W. of Saffron Walden, with a large village, formerly a market town. The principal monuments are the Church, Martin's Farm, the Crown House, and Monks Barn."

Shortgrove House, ¾ m. N.E. of the church, is of three storeys with a cellar. The walls are of brick and the roofs are partly tiled and partly covered with slate. The original house, according to an 18th-century monumental inscription in the parish church, was built by Giles Dent in 1684; it was of modified H-shape, as the wings at the N. and S. ends projected very slightly towards the W.
The W. Elevation of the original house is divided into three bays. Each wall has rubbed brick bands between the storeys, a chamfered plinth and modern rusticated brick quoins. The windows of the two original storeys have flat arches of red brick.
In the middle bay of the N. Side, high up, the 17th-century brickwork of the original house is exposed.
Interior:—The original building has an entrance Hall in the middle, and the wings are divided into rooms, but the internal arrangement has been much altered. The Hall has original raised paneling on the walls, and the moulded grey marble fireplace is possibly original. The Business Room, N. of the Hall, has similar paneling. The secondary Staircase has original turned balusters and moulded handrails painted and re-used. The Cellar has some stop-chamfered ceiling-beams and is partly paved with thin bricks laid herring-bone-wise.

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of two storeys, timber-framed and covered with plaster; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Many of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams, wide fireplaces and original chimney-stacks.

The Saffron Walden Road, E. side
b (4). The Coach and Horses Inn, about 750 yards N. of the church, was built on a rectangular plan in the second half of the 16th century. In the 17th-century additions were made at the back, and the N. end has been extended. In front the upper storey projects and the vertical framing is exposed. Inside the building the large moulded ceiling-beams are exposed. On the first floor some of the timber construction is visible, and there is an original arched fireplace, with chamfered jambs.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

PART 2

Lower Road, E. side
b (5). Martin's Farm, house, and barn, 600 yards N. of the church. The House is of two storeys with a cellar. It was built in the 15th century, on a rectangular plan with a Hall in the middle, a Solar at the N. end and a Buttery at the S. end. Late in the 16th century a chimney-stack was inserted between the Hall and the Solar; part of the E. wall of the Hall was removed and the room was extended on that side; at the same time the Hall was divided into two storeys, and two gabled wings were added at the back.
The four 16th-century fireplaces and the moulded brick chimney-shafts are noteworthy.
On the W. Front part of the upper storey projects and has close set vertical framing; the ground floor is almost entirely of modern brick; the gable at the N. end has original moulded and foiled barge-boards with a small quatrefoil ornament at one end. Under the eaves are the remains of five original louvres or ventilators, each of three lights with moulded mullions, not grooved for glass.
The E. Elevation is covered with plaster and has four gables. The main chimney-stack is of the 16th century and has four circular shafts, enriched with a variety of designs in moulded brick, restored caps, and a rectangular paneled base.
Interior:—On the ground floor the Hall is now divided by a passage into two rooms. On each side of the chimney-stack is an enriched plaster fireplace with a four-centered head, pilasters and an entablature; the fireplace on the S. side has modelled spandrels and a frieze of dolphins' heads. There are five 16th-century paneled doors and two plain doors of oak. In the middle room there is a little paneling of late 16th-century date, and a cupboard in the kitchen is made up of similar paneling with cock's-head hinges. On the first floor there are two plaster fireplaces with flanking pilasters and four-centered heads somewhat similar to those on the ground floor. There are also four late 16th-century paneled doors, three with cock's-head hinges, and a fifth of rough oak battens. The larger projecting wing at the back has a blocked window of three lights, with moulded mullions of late 16th-century date. The original roof was burnt, but some of the charred timbers were re-used; in the roof is an old dove-cot.

The Barn, E. of the house, is of the 17th-century and of four bays with side-aisles, and a N. wing of later date, The walls are weather-boarded, and the roof is covered with corrugated iron. A second barn with a thatched roof may be of late 17th-century date.

b (6). Cottage, S. of (5), built probably in the 16th-century, and with a modern brick addition at the N.E. corner. The upper storey projects at the W. end, and the original chimney-stack on the N. side has three shafts.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

PART 3

b (7). Crown House, S. of (6), is of two storeys with a cellar, and was built on a rectangular plan probably late in the 16th century. In the 17th century additions were built at the back, making the plan irregularly L-shaped. The date 1692 over the door probably refers to the plaster-work and the shell-hood.
The W. front has ornamental plaster panels with roses, foliage and garlands; in the middle is a crown in high relief; above the doorway is the date 1692 and a good shell-hood resting on carved brackets; the casement windows have projecting lintels and two of them are blocked. The back elevation is plainly plastered and has four gables.
Interior:—The 17th-century staircase has twisted balusters and moulded handrails. On the first floor some of the original timber-framing is exposed, and in the narrow wing at the back is a plain original fireplace with a four-centered arch and stop-chamfered jambs.

b (8). Cottage, two tenements, S. of (7), built probably in the 16th century, and with two modern additions at the back.

b (9). Cottage, two tenements, S. of (8), built probably in the 16th century, and with modern additions at the back. Inside the building in both tenements a moulded ceiling-beam is exposed.

b (10). The Three Tuns Inn, S. of (9), was built probably late in the 15th century and consists of two parts of unequal height; there are small modern additions at the back. In front the upper storey projects and has a moulded fascia carved with running ornament, now much weathered. The close-set vertical timber-framing is exposed in both storeys. The back is partly covered with plaster. Inside the building, in the middle part of the house, the moulded ceiling beams are exposed and the large fireplace in the bar parlor has an embattled oak lintel, partly destroyed. In the upper storey part of the timber construction is visible and there is also a fireplace with a stop-chamfered oak lintel.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

PART 4

W. side
b (11). The Priory, house, now three tenements, 50 yards S.W. of (10), is of two storeys with a cellar. It was built probably late in the 15th century, on a rectangular plan with a small staircase-wing at the back. Modern additions have been made at each end and at the back. On the S.E. front the upper storey projects. At the N.E. end there is an original oriel window with moulded oak mullions, lintel and sill; the lights are arched internally; some of the other windows have iron casements. The 16th-century central chimney-stack has four grouped shafts.
Interior:—On the S.W. side of the central chimney-stack the blocked fireplace has a massive moulded oak lintel. In the N.E. part of the house the moulded ceiling-beams are exposed, and the door to the staircase wing is of rough oak paneling, probably of late 16th-century date. Above the doorway to the second staircase is part of the flat four-centered head of a 16th-century doorway. The cellar has a large window, partly blocked, and a well in the floor. In the upper storey the roof-construction is exposed and has shaped wall-posts, and cambered tie-beams with curved braces, and king-posts with two-way struts. On each side of the central stack is a small recess with a flat pointed head, and on the N.E. side there is a brick fireplace with a head of similar shape. Traces of stamped decoration remain on the internal plaster-work.

Main Street, E. side
b (12). Cottage, 80 yards S. of (11), is probably of the 17th century, with a modern addition at the back. The plan is of modified T-shape with the cross-wing at the N. end, built partly of stone at the back.

b (13). House, 100 yards S. of (12), was built probably late in the 15th or early in the 16th century; later in the 16th century a small extension was made at the N. end. In the front of the original house the upper storey projects, and has a moulded bressumer and vertical timber-framing; the upper storey of the extension also projects, but is plastered. Inside the building some original moulded ceiling-beams with broach-stops are exposed, and the doorway to the staircase has a moulded frame and a four-centered head.

b (14). Cottage, S. of (13), built in the 17th century.

b (15). Cottage, S. of (14), built in the 17th century.

b (16). The White Horse Inn, S. of (15), built probably late in the 17th century. There is a dove-cot in the S. gable, and the S. end is weather-boarded.

b (17). House and shop, S. of (16), built in the 17th century and with an 18th-century wing at the back. The main roof is brought down low at the back.

b (18). House and shop, 130 yards S. of (17), built probably in the 17th century. It has a projecting wing at the back and three dormer windows in front. At the S. end is an 18th-century addition; the house has been much restored and altered.

b (19). The Post Office, S. of (18), built in the 17th century, with an 18th-century wing at the back.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

PART 5

b (20). Monk's Barn, house, now two tenements, 100 yards S. of (19), was built in the 15th century on a rectangular plan, the S. part of the building being narrower and a little lower than the rest. The chimney-stack was inserted probably in the 16th century. It is an interesting example of a 15th-century building, with elaborate wood carving below the oriel window.
In front the close-set vertical timber-framing is filled in with brickwork, laid diagonally, and largely original; the upper storey projects at each end, and from the projections spring curved braces which support the coved eaves of the middle part; one of the brackets supporting the beam of the N. projection is original, and is carried down as an attached shaft with a moulded capital. In the N. tenement the oak door has nail-studded battens and a moulded frame with a four-centered arch, square head and carved spandrels.
N. of the door, in the projecting upper storey, is a modern oriel window with an original carved oak base; rising from conventional clouds is a crowned figure of the Virgin holding the Child in her left arm and a sceptre in her right hand; on each side is the figure of an angel holding an organ and a harp respectively. Some of the other windows have old metal casements. At the S. end of the house the timber-framing is exposed, but the other elevations are plastered. The central chimney-stack is cross-shaped on plan.
Interior:—The middle part of the house has moulded ceiling-beams and the joists are exposed in all the rooms. In the N. tenement there is a blocked doorway with a four-centered head and moulded frame. In the upper storey one moulded beam on shaped wall-posts is exposed, and at each end of the main block is a roof-truss with curved braces; those at the N. end meet to form an arch.

b (21). The Old Vicarage, 140 yards S. of (20), is of two storeys with a cellar, and was built, probably early in the 16th century, on a rectangular plan. There are two modern additions at the back. In front the upper storey projects and is gabled at each end. Most of the back elevation has been re-faced with modern brick but part of the upper storey originally projected. Inside the building the arrangement appears to have been of the usual type, with the Hall in the middle and a room at each end. W. of the central chimney-stack is a plain staircase of old oak. The roof of the N. gable has a king-post truss with carved braces below the tie-beam.

b (22). House, and shop, 120 yards S. of (21), built probably in the 17th century, but much altered and restored.

b (23). House, and shop, 80 yards S. of (22), built probably in 1694, the date on the W. wall. The plan is L-shaped with the wings extending towards the N. and W.

b (24). The Railway Inn, 30 yards S. of (23), is modern, with two 17th-century cottages incorporated in it.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

PART 6

W. side
b (25). House, 200 yards S.S.E. of the church, is probably of late 16th-century date, and formerly extended further towards the N. In front the upper storey projects, and the wall-posts and tie-beam are exposed at the N. end. Some of the window-fastenings are old.

b (26). Cottage, 250 yards N. of (25), built in the 17th century. Some old casement windows remain.

b (27). House, 60 yards N. of (26), built probably late in the 17th century, and of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S. and W. The front of the main block has been re-faced with modern brick.

b (28). Cottage, 40 yards N. of (27), built in the 17th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N. and W.

Elephants Green, W. side b (30). Cottage, now two tenements, 75 yards N.E. of the church, built in the 17th century, on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S.

Wicken Road, S. side a (31). Cottage, now two tenements, 75 yards S. of the church, built probably late in the 16th century. In front the upper storey projects.

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/essex/vol…

pictures at
https://historyhouse.co.uk/placeN/essexn05.html

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

1667

  • Oct