Thursday 17 January 1666/67

Up, and to the office, where all the morning sitting. At noon home to dinner, and then to the office busy also till very late, my heart joyed with the effects of my following my business, by easing my head of cares, and so home to supper and to bed.


6 Annotations

CGS  •  Link

"...by easing my head of cares..."
a load off his mind.

Res quanto est maior tanto est insidiosior
Syrus , Maxims

The bigger the undertaking, the trickier it is

David G  •  Link

In other words, he cleared his desk. It’s both unusual and satisfying when that happens.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Thank goodness ... I can use a night off after yesterday's marathon.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

L&M: New regulations for the issue of pay tickets were concluded by the Navy Board on 17 January, 1667, but proved difficult to enforce in war conditions: PL 2874, p. 479.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

HOUSE OF LORDS today:
"ORDERED, That the Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer is appointed to attend the Committee for the Bill to prevent the defrauding the King of His Monies, on Saturday next, at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon."

That's one way to phrase the Castlemaine problem.

The Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer was Sir Matthew Hale (1 November 1609 – 25 December 1676).

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

You may remember the case brought against Viscount Mordaunt:

https://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/12/11/
Monday 26 November 1666
"I down to Westminster, and there into the House of Parliament, where, at a great Committee, I did hear, as long as I would, the great case against my Lord Mordaunt, for some arbitrary proceedings of his against one Taylor, whom he imprisoned, and did all the violence to imaginable, only to get him to give way to his abusing his daughter."

Per L&M: This is a Grand Committee of Grievances of the Commons, which Pepys, as a member of the public, had no right to attend. Its proceedings are not noticed in the official Journals of either House.

Today Viscount Mordaunt gets to make his case. Basically, it's all a big misunderstanding, and Taylor didn't do his job, etc.
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/lords-jrnl/vol1…

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