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Sasha Clarkson has posted 736 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Tuesday 16 May 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

Let's suppose that "with child" is used loosely, meaning "pregnant, or just having given birth". Then we might use Mrs Pepys (11/14) as an estimated proportion of the number of women one might expect to be in this situation. Using the 95% confidence interval for this proprtion yields a rough estimate of [33, 45] women out of 50 widows of child bearing age who might be expected to be in this state. In truth it's rather more complicated of course, but it's neither inconceivable (ha ha) nor incredible that 45 of these widows might have been "with child" in this loose sense.

About John Unthank

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

Unthank is an interesting name: there are a few hamlets/small villages named Unthank in the North of England; there's even an Unthank Hall. However, I suspect that more people live in Norwich's Unthank Road than in all of the other places put together.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unthank

According to Ancestry, the meaning derives from Old English unthanc ‘without consent’, i.e. a squatter’s holding.

About Sunday 14 May 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

"After dinner my wife and she and Mercer to Thomas Pepys’s wife’s christening of *his* first child"

Even if Thomas had married a widow with children, the use of "his" not "their" says something about the society they lived in.

About Sunday 14 May 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

The phrase "the wisest fool in Christendom" apparently originates in Weldon's book.

A little more on him here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Weldon

One can just imagine Sam chortling gleefully at scurrilous but "treasonous" comments, and then reproving himself: "I should take less pleasure in this wickedness - but just another page or two..."

About Sunday 7 May 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

What a contrast with yesterday.

Despite a bit if business with Mr Anrdews, this 'Lords's Day' has truly turned out to be a day of relaxation and recuperation, as well as the statutory religious observance - a "Sabbath made for Man ..."

There was also the barest mention of the second visit to church and the sermon - perhaps Sam slept though it again? :D

About Saturday 6 May 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

So far as Elizabeth was concerned, one of the most important changes since a year ago is that she has mended her fences with Lady Batten. I would imagine that means that Bess feels less isolated, whereas before there might have been a bit of a siege mentality in the Pepys' quarters?

About Thursday 27 April 1665

Sasha Clarkson  •  Link

To me, the most significant part of today's entry is the mention of Will Hewer, indicating his evolution from apprentice to Personal Assistant, on the way to becoming a valued colleague, ally and friend.