Annotations and comments

Chris Squire UK has posted 773 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Saturday 17 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . things go so coldly . . ‘

‘coldly, adv. < Old English . .
. . 2. b. Without ardour, enthusiasm . .
. . a1616 Shakespeare King John (1623) v. iii. 13 The French fight coldly, and retyre themselues . . ‘

(OED)

About Saturday 10 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . the first-fruits of my endeavours in the late contract . . ‘

‘first fruit, n. < in early use translating classical Latin primitiae n. . .
. . 2. fig. and in extended use.
 a. In pl. The earliest products or results of anything; the first products of a person's work or endeavour . .
▸c1384   Bible (Wycliffite, E.V.) (Royal) (1850) Apoc. xiv. 4   Thes [sc. virgins] ben bouȝt of alle, primycies, or firste fruytis[L. primitiae], to God, and to the lamb . . '

(OED)

About Friday 9 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . the most pleasant boy . . ’

‘pleasant, adj. < French . .
3. Of a person: having pleasing manners, demeanour, or appearance; amiable, cheerful, good-humoured.
. . 1642 H. More Ψυχωδια Platonica sig. C8 A jolly Swain Methought he was; meek, cheerfull, and pleasant . . ‘

(OED)

I agree with LH and m: 12 rather than 19 - how long will this last, I wonder? No doubt for the present he’s delighted to be free of the schoolroom and endless church services, etc. but as winter comes in he will find the endless days of hanging about punctuated by errand running along the cold, wet, filthy and smelly streets just as tiresome.

About Thursday 8 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . a decayed merchant’s daughter . . '

‘decayed, adj.
1. Fallen off, impaired, or reduced in . . prosperity, fortune, etc.; spec. in phr. decayed gentlewoman.
. .1711 J. Addison Spectator No. 165. ¶1 Theodosius was the younger Son of a decayed Family
. . 1921 G. B. Shaw Let. 13 Jan. in Bernard Shaw & Mrs. Patrick Campbell (1952) 218 The celebrated decayed gentlewoman who had to cry laces in the street for a living but hoped that nobody heard her.
1961 J. Gloag Victorian Comfort viii. 212 Impoverished widows and spinsters of the middle classes, who were officially described as ‘decayed gentlewomen’.’

(OED)

About Sunday 4 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘one Mrs. Ferrabosco . . ’

‘Mrs, n.1 . .
. . 1. b. A title prefixed to the name of an unmarried lady or girl; = miss n.2 2a. Now rare except as a title of courtesy applied, with or without inclusion of the first name, to elderly unmarried ladies (this use seems to have arisen in the late 18th cent.).
. . 1645 J. Howell Epistolæ Ho-elianæ v. xxxv. 40 An ill-favoured quarrell..about Mrs. Baker, the Mayd of honor . . ‘

‘Miss n. . . 2. In form Miss, as a title.
a. Preceding the name of an unmarried woman or girl without a higher or honorific professional title.
1667 S. Pepys Diary 7 Mar. (1974) VIII. 101 Little Mis Davis did dance a Jigg after the end of the play . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 1 September 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

‘scrod, n. Possibly < Dutch †schrood . .

A young cod weighing less than three pounds, esp. one that is split and fried or boiled. Also used of young forms of other fishes, esp. the haddock, or a fillet cut from one of these fishes.
1841 Spirit of Times 16 Oct. 396/2 Supplied with a few ship biscuit [sic], a dried scrod, a bottle of good swizzle [etc.] . . ‘

(OED)

About Tuesday 30 August 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . the vanity of the French garbe . . ’

‘garb, n.2 < . . Italian
.. . 4.a. Fashion of dress, esp. official or other distinctive dress; hence concr. dress, costume.
1622 H. Peacham Compl. Gentleman xv. 191 Be thriftie also in your apparrell and clothing..vsing that moderate and middle garbe, which shall rather lessen then make you bigger then you are . . ‘

(OED)

About Monday 29 August 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . never since I was housekeeper . . ’

‘housekeeper, n.
1. A person who owns or occupies a house or other place of residence, typically considered as having overall responsibility for the general care of the members of the household; . . = householder n. 2 (obs.).
. . 1685 in J. A. Picton City of Liverpool: Select. Munic. Rec. (1883) I. 329 None but housekeepers shall sitt in the seate on ye north side..and..none but the wives and widdows of housekeepers..'twixt the baylives wives and ye font . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 25 August 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . I matter not much to compliment or make any regard of his thinking me to slight him . . ‘

‘matter v. < Anglo-Norman . .
4. In negative contexts:
a. trans. To care or be concerned about; to regard, heed, mind; . . Now Brit. regional and Caribbean.
. . 1664 H. More Modest Enq. Myst. Iniquity xi. 37 I matter not what careless abuses there may be put upon a word . . ‘
……….
Re: ‘ . . those able men, subsidy men, 
. . ‘
‘subsidy . . 2.b. A pecuniary aid levied by a sovereign, lord, etc., or granted by parliament to a sovereign, for a particular purpose, esp. for defence against foreign attack.

. . subsidy man n. now hist. a person liable to pay a subsidy to a lord; (hence) a person of means or substance.
. . 1597–8 Act 39 Eliz. c. 3 §1 Fower substanciall Howsholders there beinge Subsidy men, or for wante of Subsidy men fower other substanciall Howseholders . . ‘
……….
Re: ’ . . he would take his course . . ’

‘course n. < French . .
22.a A line of (personal) action, way of acting, method of proceeding . . †to take a course: to act in a particular way or with a particular purpose; to take steps (obs.) . . ‘
……….

About Saturday 20 August 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘outroper’:

‘outroper, n. < early modern Dutch . .
. . 1638 1st Charter Charles I to London in J. Luffman Charters (1793) 275 We..do erect and create in and through the said City..a certain office, called Outroper or Common Cryer, to and for the selling of houshold stuff, apparel, leases..and other things, of all persons who shall be willing that the said officers shall make sale of the same by public and open claim, commonly called outcry and sale . . ‘

(OED)