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Chris Squire UK has posted 789 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Saturday 15 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . we saw his water-works and the Oral . . ‘

‘noria, n. < Spanish < Arabic < Aramaic (Syriac) . . Originally in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries but subsequently more widely, esp. in the East: a device for raising water from a stream or river, consisting of a chain of pots or buckets revolving round a wheel which take in water when submerged and discharge it when they turn over at the top.

1696 P. Ayres Revengeful Mistress 24 Their usual Recreation in the Evenings, was..to view the Norias or admirable Water-works, with which the Spaniards industriously water their Gardens, or supply their Fountains . . ‘

(OED)
……………
Pope’s Twickenham grotto is now in the hands of a trust which will restore it: http://www.popesgrotto.org.uk/ In Britain today we are (as in Pepys’ day) too poor or too mean to house our homeless - leaving them to sleep in the street - but unlimited funds are available to restore old buildings in the nicer parts of the capital like Twickenham; so Strawberry Hill (http://www.strawberryhillhouse.org.uk/) and Turner’s house hve been restored (http://turnershouse.org/) and work is about to start on Marble Hill (https://twickerati.wordpress.com/2017/10/18/eng...).

The former Pope’s Grotto pub is now the Alexander Pope hotel.

About Wednesday 12 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . evened with (him) for 100 pieces of callico . . ’

‘even, v. < Old English . .
. . 4.  a. To make (accounts, etc.) even; to balance, settle, square; to come to agreement upon (points of difference).
. . 1664   S. Pepys Diary 15 July (1971) IV. 206   He hath now evened his reckonings at the Wardrobe till Michaelmas last.’
…………...
Re: ‘ . . to look out some Dram timber . . ’

‘dram, n.2 < Short for Drammen.
Timber from Drammen in Norway. Also attrib. 1663—1858’
…………...
Re: ‘ . . can find none for our turne . . ’

'turn, n. < Anglo-Norman . .
. . 30. a. Requirement, need, exigency; purpose, use, convenience. arch.
. . 1659   H. Hammond Paraphr. & Annot. Psalms (xviii. 5 Annot.) 99/2   Ropes or cords are proper for that turne.
…………...
(OED)

About Tuesday 11 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . where we sat all the morning.’

‘sit, v. < Common Germanic . .
. . 4. a. To occupy a seat in the capacity of a judge or with some administrative function.
. . 1681 A. Wood Life 17 Aug. The judges..went to the Guildhall yard where they sate from 9 to 12 . . ‘

(OED)

About Monday 10 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . Sir W. Batten do raffle still against Mr. Turner and his wife .. ‘

‘raffle, v.3 < Origin uncertain. Obs. rare. intr. To quarrel, wrangle.
a1796 S. Pegge Two Coll. Derbicisms (1896) 117 Raffle, to wrangle and quarrel . . ‘

(OED)

About Sunday 9 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . from church dogged her home . . ’

‘dog, v.1 < dog n.1… etymology unknown. No likely cognates have been identified with a meaning at all close to that of the English word, and all attempted etymological explanations are extremely speculative. A word of this phonological shape is hard to explain as a regular development from a Germanic base . .

 1. trans.  a. To follow like a dog on the heels of; to track (a person, or his or her trail, footsteps, etc.) closely and persistently . .
. . 1608   R. Tofte in tr. L. Ariosto Satyres iv. 64 (note)    Many Italians vse to dog their wiues when they goe abroad, the poore women not thinking that their husbands do watch them as they doe . . ‘

(OED)

About Friday 7 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . even to the having bad words with my wife, and blows too . . ‘

‘blow, n.1 < Origin doubtful . .
3. ‘An act of hostility’ (Johnson). Usually in pl. blows = ‘combat, fighting, war’. .
. . 1651   T. Hobbes Leviathan i. v. 19   Their controversie must either come to blowes, or be undecided . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 6 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . a rare chine of beefe . . ‘

‘rare, adj.2 < Originally a variant of rear adj.1 . .  
 1. Of meat, esp. beef: lightly cooked; underdone . . Formerly often regarded as an Americanism, . . although it was current in English writing from the 18th cent. and in many English dialects . .
1615 G. Markham Eng. Hus-wife in Countrey Contentments ii. 54   To know when meate is rosted enough, for as too much rareness is unwholsome, so too much drinesse is not nourishing.'
……..
Re: ‘ . . bring in of calicos .. . ‘

‘calico < Portuguese Qualecut (= calcutta) . .
. . 2. b. Now, in England, applied chiefly to plain white unprinted cotton cloth, bleached or unbleached (called in Scotland and U.S. cotton).
. . 1666   S. Pepys Diary 24 Sept. (1972) VII. 295   Flags which I had bought for the Navy, of calico.'
……..
Re: ‘ . . Prince Rupert is fallen into Lee Road . .’

‘road < Germanic . .
. . II. A place where ships ride.
 3. a. Now usually in pl. A sheltered piece of water near the shore where vessels may lie at anchor in safety; a roadstead.
. . 1652   M. Nedham tr. J. Selden Of Dominion of Sea 111   Princes..impose Custom upon Ships, as for the use of the Road upon their Coasts.'
……..
(OED)

About Sir George Ayscue

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

From 2017 DNB:

‘Opinions of Ayscue varied. Clarendon called him ‘a gentleman, but had kept ill company too long, which had blunted his understanding, if it had ever been sharp: he was of few words, yet spake to the purpose and to be easily understood’. Pepys believed he did not have ‘much of a seaman in him … by his discourse I find that he hath not minded anything in [his ship] at all’, but then Ayscue had just criticized the lack of organization of the Navy Board which Pepys served. On the other hand, Sir William Coventry found him ‘a very honest, gallant man … he does not serve mercenarily, for he lives handsomely and honourably in the fleet, beyond his pay’.’

About Monday 3 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . by each other’s dalliance . . “

‘dalliance, n. < Old French . .
. . †4. Waste of time in trifling, idle delay. Obs.
. . 1616 Shakespeare Comedy of Errors (1623) iv. i. 59 My businesse cannot brooke this dalliance .
(OED)
…………...
“ . . My old man said: "Foller the van,
And don't dilly-dally on the way".
Off went the van wiv me 'ome packed in it.
I walked be'ind wiv me old cock linnet.

But I dillied and dallied,
Dallied and dillied;
Lost me way and don't know where to roam.

And you can't trust a "Special"
Like the old-time copper
When you can't find your way home . . “

Don't Dilly Dally - old English music hall song

About Sunday 2 October 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . a place too good for this puppy . .’

‘puppy, n. < Middle French, . .
. . 2. a. colloq. (frequently derogatory). A foolish, conceited, or impertinent young man . .
1544 E. Allen tr. A. Alesius Auctorite Word of God sig. D That curse that the puppy bloweth out vnder the name of almighty god & the holy saintes Peter & Paul.
. . 1996 Independent (Nexis) 12 Oct. 16 It was not the Yorkshire Police who had done this to him but arrogant young puppies sent up from the Metropolitan Police.’