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Chris Squire UK has posted 826 annotations/comments since 16 February 2013.

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About Friday 9 December 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . my pretended freight of the “William” . . ’

‘pretended, adj. . .
1. b. gen. Falsely alleged; invalid, non-existent.
. . a1684 J. Evelyn Diary anno 1679 (1955) IV. 187 Shewing with how little reason the Papists applied those words..to maintaine the pretended Infallibility they boast of . .

. . c. Put forward as a defence, excuse, or pretext; professed falsely or insincerely. Now rare.
. . 1643 Milton Doctr. Divorce 17 The pretended reason of it [is] as frigid as frigidity it self . .

2. Feigned; spurious; counterfeit, forged.
. . 1666 R. Boyle Let. 9 Mar. in Corr. (2001) III. 100 If the pretended Miracles of Pyrrhus & Vespasian had bin watchd & considerd by Mr Stubbe as narrowly as those of Mr Greaterick have bin, you would have found at least as much reason to ascribe Their Cures, as His, to Phisicall causes. . .

3. Intended, proposed. Obs.

4. Put forward for consideration or acceptance. Obs.
1646 T. Gataker Mistake Removed To Rdr. 1 A bush sufficient of itself to invite to such pretious pretended liquor . . ‘

(OED)

About Thursday 8 December 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’umbrella’:

‘umbrella, n. < Italian . .
1. a. A light portable screen or shade, usually circular in form and supported on a central stick or staff, used in hot countries as a protection for the head or person against the sun.
1611 T. Coryate Crudities sig. Lv Many of them doe carry other fine things.., which they commonly call in the Italian tongue vmbrellaes... These are made of leather something answerable to the forme of a little cannopy & hooped in the inside with diuers little wooden hoopes that extend the vmbrella in a prety large compasse.

2. A portable protection against bad weather, made of silk or similar material fastened on slender ribs, which are attached radially to a stick and can be readily raised so as to form a circular arched canopy.
1634 T. Herbert Relation Some Yeares Trauaile 149 A Shagg or Yopangee which riding serues [in Persia] as an Vmbrella against raine.
1716 J. Gay Trivia i. 14 Good houswives..underneath th'Umbrella's oily Shed, Safe thro' the wet on clinking Pattens tread . . ‘

(OED)

About Monday 5 December 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ’ . . she tells us, how fat Mrs. The. is grown . . ’

‘mistress, n. and adj. < A borrowing from French . .
. . 11.b. Preceding the first name or surname of an unmarried woman or girl: = miss n.2 2a. Obs.
. . 1710 Swift Jrnl. to Stella 30 Nov. (1948) I. 109 So, here is mistress Stella again with her two eggs . . ‘

About Monday 5 December 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . afterwards was asked some scurvy questions by Povy . . ‘

‘scurvy, adj. < scurf n.1 < Late Old English . .
. . 2. a. fig. Sorry, worthless, contemptible. Said both of persons and things. Cf. scabbed adj. 2. Also of treatment, etc.: shabby, discourteous. Now somewhat arch.
. . a1616 Shakespeare Othello (1622) iv. ii. 144 The Moore's abus'd by some outragious knaue: Some base notorious knaue, some scuruy fellow . . ‘

About Friday 2 December 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

' . . to fit up an account for Povy . . '

'fit v. < Middle English ? . .
. . IV. 11.  a. To supply, furnish, or provide with what is fit, suitable, convenient, or necessary. ? Obs. when obj. is a person.
a1616   Shakespeare Two Gentlemen of Verona (1623) ii. vii. 42  Fit me with such weedes As may beseeme some well reputed Page . .

  . . d. to fit up: to supply with necessary fittings, furniture, or stores.
1670   R. Coke Disc. Trade ii. 56   The Dutch..do fit up more Ships for Navigation, and cheaper than the English . . '
(OED)

About Prices

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

This replaces my post above from January 2016:

We have discussed this several times already. I’ve redone the sums to get these multipliers:

To compare the value of a £1 Wealth in 1664 to 1971, there are four choices. In 1971 the relative: 

historic standard of living value = £11
labour earnings = £80
economic status value = per capita GDP = £130
economic power value = £1,100.

To compare the value of a £1 Wealth in 1971 to 2015, there are four choices. In 2015 the relative: 

historic standard of living value = £13

labour earnings = £20

economic status value = per capita GDP = £25

economic power value = £30
………………………..
Multipliers 1664-2015:

historic standard of living = 11 x 13 = 140
labour earnings = 80 x 20 = 1600
economic status = per capita GDP = 130 x 25 = 3,300
economic power = 1,100 x 30 = 33,000

So in economic status, £1209 (30 Nov 1664) in 1664 = £4 million today - VERY roughly. This number seems about right to me but shouldn’t be taken too seriously as as it is only as good as the assumptions as to what is a valid comparison across 350 years and the methods used to estimate GDP. etc.

The cook’s £5 annual wage = £16,500 in economic status.

Taken and simplified from https://www.measuringworth.com/explaining_measu...

About Wednesday 30 November 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

We have discussed this several times already. I’ve redone the sums to get these multipliers:

To compare the value of a £1 Wealth in 1664 to 1971, there are four choices. In 1971 the relative: 

historic standard of living value = £11
labour earnings = £80
economic status value = per capita GDP = £130
economic power value = £1,100.

To compare the value of a £1 Wealth in 1971 to 2015, there are four choices. In 2015 the relative: 

historic standard of living value = £13
labour earnings = £20
economic status value = per capita GDP = £25
economic power value = £30
………………………..
Multipliers 1664-2015:

historic standard of living = 11 x 13 = 140
labour earnings = 80 x 20 = 1600
economic status = per capita GDP = 130 x 25 = 3,300
economic power = 1,100 x 30 = 33,000

So in economic status, £1209 (30 Nov 1664) in 1664 = £4 million today - VERY roughly. This number seems about right to me but shouldn’t be taken too seriously as as it is only as good as the assumptions as to what is a valid comparison across 350 years and the methods used to estimate GDP. etc.

The cook’s £5 annual wage = £16,500 in economic status.

Taken and simplified from https://www.measuringworth.com/explaining_measu...

About Saturday 26 November 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Multipliers for Projects:
historic opportunity cost = real price = RPI/GDP deflator = 120
labour cost = labour value = average earnings = 2,100
economic cost = share of GDP = 29,000

Taken from https://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/ which explains which index to use for different purposes.

So the economic cost in today’s money of £2,500,000 in the money of the pre-industrial world of 1660 = £2.5 X 10exp6 x 29 X10exp3 = £73 x 10exp9, i.e. £73 billion.

which seems a lot but is similar to RSGII’s estimate above (£85 billion)

About Thursday 24 November 1664

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . being proud to see myself accepted in such company and thought better than I am . . ’

This concerns social status, NOT personal worth! This is obvious to any Englishman: Pepys is gratified that he is being accepted as a gentleman by other gentlemen, despite his humble origin as a taylor’s son.

This was not inevitable: he might, in military terms, have found himself stuck in the role of senior NCO (non-commissioned officer), trusted and relied on to do the work but never accepted as an equal by the gents who ran the show by virtue of their breeding.