6 Annotations

Phil   Link to this

Wheatley and L&M are often in disagreement about these items. There was some discussion here http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/04/05/ and a little more here http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1661/04/09/

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

OED:[a. ONF. caudel (= central OF. chaudel, mod.F. chaudeau): med.L. caldellum, dim. of caldum, calidum (neut. of caldus, calidus warm) ‘a hot drink’.]
1. A warm drink consisting of thin gruel, mixed with wine or ale, sweetened and spiced, given chiefly to sick people, esp. women in childbed; also to their visitors.
then Sams quote.
before our time?
1588 Marprel. Epist. (1845) 22 He hath prooued you to haue deserued a cawdell of Hempseed, and a playster of neckweed. 1593 SHAKES. 2 Hen. VI, IV. vii. 95 Ye shall haue a hempen Caudle then, and the help of hatchet.
2. Comb. caudle-cup.
there also appears to connect to Coddle:
(Cotgr. has an obs. F. cadeler ‘to cocker, pamper, fedle, cherish, make much of’; but this is unknown elsewhere.)]

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

A cawdle for a sick body
PERIOD: England, 17th century | SOURCE: The Cooks Guide: Or, Rare Receipts for Cookery, 1654 | CLASS: Authentic
DESCRIPTION: A soothing lemon & egg drink

A cawdle for a sick body.
Take lemmon posset drink and thicken it with the yolks of eggs, and sweeten it with sugar.
to make cyderhttp://www.godecookery.com/engrec/engrec41.html
to make cock ale [perfect explainable]

http://www.godecookery.com/engrec/engrec72.html

cumgranosalis   Link to this

another source, Samuel Johnson's Dict.
"caudle n.s. [chaudeau, Fr] a mixture of wine and other ingredians, given to women in childbed, and sick persons."
Quothe Shakesp Henry VI p. ii
and Wiseman's Surgery.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Michael Quinion knows his possets, caudles, and cordials:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/possets.htm

Bill   Link to this

To make a Caudle of great virtue.

Take a pint and a half of the strongest Ale may be gotten, twenty Jordan Almonds clean wiped, but neither washed nor blanched, two Dates minced very small, and stamped, then take the pith of a young Bief, the length of twelve inches, lay it in the water till the bloud be out of it, then strip the skin off it, and stamp it with the Almonds and Dates, then strain them all together into the Ale, then boil it until it be a little thick; give the party in the morning fasting six spoonfuls, and as much when he goeth to bed.

---The Skilful Physician, 1656

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References

  • 1660
  • 1661
    • Apr