Monday 19 April 1669

Up, and with Tom (whom, with his wife, I, and my wife, had this morning taken occasion to tell that I did intend to give him 40l. for himself, and 20l. to his wife, towards their setting out in the world, and that my wife would give her 20l. more, that she might have as much to begin with as he) by coach to White Hall, and there having set him work in the Robe Chamber, to write something for me, I to Westminster Hall, and there walked from 10 o’clock to past 12, expecting to have met Deb., but whether she had been there before, and missing me went away, or is prevented in coming, and hath no mind to come to me (the last whereof, as being most pleasing, as shewing most modesty, I should be most glad of), I know not, but she not then appearing, I being tired with walking went home, and my wife being all day at Jane’s, helping her, as she said, to cut out linen and other things belonging to her new condition, I after dinner out again, and, calling for my coach, which was at the coachmaker’s, and hath been for these two or three days, to be new painted, and the window-frames gilt against May-day, went on with my hackney to White Hall, and thence by water to Westminster Hall, and there did beckon to Doll Lane, now Mrs. Powell, as she would have herself called, and went to her sister Martin’s lodgings, the first time I have been there these eight or ten months, I think, and her sister being gone to Portsmouth to her husband, I did stay and talk and drink with Doll … So away:; and to White Hall, and there took my own coach, which was now come, and so away home, and there to do business, and my wife being come home we to talk and to sup, there having been nothing yet like discovery in my wife of what hath lately passed with me about Deb., and so with great content to bed.

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

L&M disclose what the ellipsis hides

"I did stay and talk and drink with Doll and hazer ella para tocar mi thing; and yo did the like para her, but [did] not the thing itself, having not opportunity enough; and so away and to White-hall...."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Up, and with Tom (whom, with his wife, I, and my wife, had this morning taken occasion to tell that I did intend to give him L40 for himself, and L20 to his wife, , towards their setting out in the world, and that my wife would give her L20 more, that she might have as much to begin with as he) ..."

In February 1668, Pepys wrote: "I do intend to give her 50l. in money, and do them all the good I can in my way. " http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/02/11/
L&M think this was perhaps for both of them.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I wonder if Bess actually pulled 20Ls from her dress allowance...A pretty large slice...Or if she had saved it. If so, it suggests Sam had been allowing her to keep what she could save from the housekeeping expenses.

"You saved 20Ls Bess? Why that's remarkable."

Hmmn...Flashback to various "bad dinner" entries...

"Wait a mo!"

"Dear...You can either believe I saved it from the housekeeping money by cutting a few corners once in a while or consider the alternatives." Smile.

"'The alternatives'? Bess? What do you mean, alternatives?"

Uh-oh.

Mary   Link to this

Monday morning .... and no Deb.

NJM   Link to this

Robert G. You are not thinking of that old joke are you where the man finds that his wife has £20 and sixpence and asks her "who gave you the sixpence ?!" whereupon she answers "They all did !"

Strange for Sam to have taken a boat from Whitehall to Westminster Hall - a walking distance of just a couple of hundred yards.

Mary   Link to this

Short boat trip.

Perhaps the streets were particularly sloppy today.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

by water to Westminster Hall

Sam's been up and down the way from Whitehall to Westminster and back all day, and only records one one-way trip by water, so my inference is that the street wasn't particularly sloppy. First he took a coach trip to Whitehall and then proceeded (on foot or by coach not clear) to the hoped-for rendezvous at Westminster. The distance appears to be less than half-a-mile, an easy walk After becoming weary with waiting, he goes home for dinner, probably by hackney picked up somewhere in the area. After dinner another hackney coach from home to Whitehall and the boat trip to Westminster, then back to Whitehall (presumably by land) and a coach home. Maybe the street was clogged when he chose the water route or maybe he was hoping not to be seen. Or maybe it was a nice day for a short boat trip. Sam does say that after walking around Westminster for more than two hours he was "tired with walking."

languagehat   Link to this

"expecting to have met Deb., but whether she had been there before, and missing me went away, or is prevented in coming, and hath no mind to come to me (the last whereof, as being most pleasing, as shewing most modesty, I should be most glad of), I know not"

The cognitive dissonance is truly astonishing. It's amazing that he was aware enough of it to set it down so clearly, but not enough that his head exploded.

john   Link to this

To give 80l in toto. On 02 Jan 1660, he wrote: "I take myself now to be worth 300l. clear in money"

Quite the journey for us all!

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"The cognitive dissonance is truly astonishing."

Well put, LH. I too was struck by the conflicting thoughts in this passage.

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